CSS Savannah Threat: An open passageway from Savannah to Port Royal?

On December 7, 1863, Commander William Reynolds, senior naval officer at Port Royal, South Carolina, submitted a report to Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren which highlighted concerns for the safety of that important port: Sir:  After the Chippewa’s expedition up Skull Creek the other day, I sent Lieutenant-Commander Harris on short to see Colonel Barton, commandant atContinue reading “CSS Savannah Threat: An open passageway from Savannah to Port Royal?”

“The object of the expedition was fully accomplished”: Joint operation along Skull Creek

Through much of the Civil War, Skull Creek was the perimeter line for the Federal base on Hilton Head Island.  The creek connects Broad River with Calibogue River, thus creating the waterway separating the island.  The marshes and brackish water creeks provided a buffer between the Federal positions and Confederate posts further inland.  But occasionallyContinue reading ““The object of the expedition was fully accomplished”: Joint operation along Skull Creek”

Raids along the coast: Were these precursors to the burning in the Shenandoah Valley?

Last week I discussed the Combahee Ferry Raid. But that was not the only raid Major-General David Hunter authorized. In the days after the 2nd South Carolina’s foray, several other similar raids hit points along the South Carolina and Georgia coast. On June 4, 1863 a party from Fort Pulaski on five steamers worked throughContinue reading “Raids along the coast: Were these precursors to the burning in the Shenandoah Valley?”