Battle of the Bands, part 2: Comparison between Tredegar, Macon, and authentic Parrotts

When discussing Parrott rifles, we really have to focus on the bands.  The bands over the breech end of the cannon are what make the Parrott a Parrott, by type.  Without the band, the Parrott would simply be a gun of cast-iron that generally followed the Ordnance Shape in exterior arrangements.  One that would beContinue reading “Battle of the Bands, part 2: Comparison between Tredegar, Macon, and authentic Parrotts”

See where the big rifles were made: West Point Foundry Preserve now open

You cannot study Civil War artillery without at least some time spent considering the work of Robert P. Parrott and the products of West Point Foundry. The foundry produced over 2,500 cannon and 3 million projectiles, most of which fed into the Federal war effort.  I’d argue the foundry site is equally important as someContinue reading “See where the big rifles were made: West Point Foundry Preserve now open”

Shellguns for the spardecks: Dahlgren’s X-inch Shellguns

Back when discussing Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren’s shell guns and their relatives, I used this chart to illustrate the lineage: The IX-inch shell guns, XI-inch shell guns, and XV-inch turret guns, which saw extensive service, particularly in the waters off Charleston, I’ve given some attention already.  And those guns deserve more attention as time permits.  ButContinue reading “Shellguns for the spardecks: Dahlgren’s X-inch Shellguns”