“It was the time of the burning”: A story from Loudoun County’s Burning Raid

On December 2, 1864, Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt led his 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Shenandoah westward through Snicker’s Gap.  With that passage, the cavalry concluded a raid, started on November 27, through Loudoun Valley and western parts of Loudoun County.  This was, in a smaller for, the same treatment given portions of the ShenandoahContinue reading ““It was the time of the burning”: A story from Loudoun County’s Burning Raid”

Signal stations, patrols, pickets, and videttes in the winter of 1864

In yesterday’s post on the signal stations in Culpeper County during the winter of 1864, we saw the dual role of those stations in the southern half of the county.  The stations provided communication links and performed as observation posts, on high points, overlooking the Confederate lines.  The observations from those stations provided valuable intelligenceContinue reading “Signal stations, patrols, pickets, and videttes in the winter of 1864”

“We don’t need their infernal old sharp-sticks at all.”: Colonel Gibbs airs grievances, January 29, 1864

Colonel Alfred Gibbs commanded the Reserve Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division during the winter encampment of 1864.  His brigade picketed Rapidan River crossing points near Cedar Mountain and other points south of Culpeper.  This was part of the picket line established south of Cedar Mountain earlier in January. On this day (January 29) inContinue reading ““We don’t need their infernal old sharp-sticks at all.”: Colonel Gibbs airs grievances, January 29, 1864″