Distribution of Vessels, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 1, 1865

During the war the commanders of the Navy’s operating squadrons provided periodic reports on the assignments of vessels in their respective commands.  Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren did so twice a month (with some variance, but more or less on the 1st and 15th of each month).  As was the practice, he submitted a report on JanuaryContinue reading “Distribution of Vessels, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 1, 1865”

“A large propeller ran in and a side-wheel steamer ran out”: Inefficiencies of the Charleston blockade, October 1864

Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren urged his subordinates to maintain their vigilance on the blockade outside Charleston in the fall of 1864.  With one port after another closed by Federal advances, now Charleston and Wilmington, North Carolina remained on the eastern coast as major ports serving blockade runners.  To a hard pressed Confederacy, every blockade runner arrivalContinue reading ““A large propeller ran in and a side-wheel steamer ran out”: Inefficiencies of the Charleston blockade, October 1864″

“I was forced to surrender”: Loss of a picket boat from the USS Nipsic

During the middle and late war years, the waters in front of Fort Sumter were the equivalent of a no-man’s-land, though without the firm ground for a picket to place a foot.  By day, monitors stood in the channel occasionally trading shots with the Confederate batteries.  At night, picket boats from both sides patrolled, scouted,Continue reading ““I was forced to surrender”: Loss of a picket boat from the USS Nipsic”