Distribution of Vessels, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 1, 1865

During the war the commanders of the Navy’s operating squadrons provided periodic reports on the assignments of vessels in their respective commands.  Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren did so twice a month (with some variance, but more or less on the 1st and 15th of each month).  As was the practice, he submitted a report on JanuaryContinue reading “Distribution of Vessels, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, January 1, 1865”

“Ninety-eight of these shells struck the vessel”: Destruction of the blockade runner Flora

At least four different blockade runners used the name “Flora.”  The third of these was an iron steamer owned by the Importing and Exporting Company of Georgia, associated with the Lamars of that state.  On October 18, the Flora left Nassau for her maiden run through the blockade, heading for Charleston.  Bad luck dogged theContinue reading ““Ninety-eight of these shells struck the vessel”: Destruction of the blockade runner Flora”

“This looks very unpromising for the efficiency of the blockade”: Runners continue to use Charleston

The ten days of September 1864 was an active one for blockade runners, both making and leaving Charleston, South Carolina.  In “Lifeline of the Confederacy,” historian Stephen Wise counted three blockaders clearing Charleston, at least two arriving, and one sunk in the period of September 1-10, 1864.  As I’ve mentioned previously, a lot of factorsContinue reading ““This looks very unpromising for the efficiency of the blockade”: Runners continue to use Charleston”