“Every vestige of the prejudice and ill feeling… has disappeared”: Gillmore on the USCT

By December 1863, Major-General Quincy Gillmore had commanded the Department of the South, and more specifically the Tenth Corps, for seven months.  In that time, his command took possession of Morris Island, but only through an active, vigorous campaign of three months.  The follow up was a prolonged bombardment of Fort Sumter, with occasional prodsContinue reading ““Every vestige of the prejudice and ill feeling… has disappeared”: Gillmore on the USCT”

Colored troops will receive the same treatment and opportunities: The Gettysburg Address and G.O. 105

Today many will recall, with good reason, President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.  Several contemporary written copies of that famous speech offer slight variations. The words may be different, but the meaning is there.  We tend to forget in the context of the time, that speech, and its meaning, were extensions of Lincoln’s policies – hisContinue reading “Colored troops will receive the same treatment and opportunities: The Gettysburg Address and G.O. 105”

The horse and the ox: Comparing the work of whites and blacks on Morris Island

As the work from the fifth parallel drug on… slowly drug on… Major Thomas Brooks recorded a change of the duty regiment among the fatigue detail on August 31, 1863: The Third U.S. Colored Troops, who have been on fatigue duty in the advanced trenches since the 20th instant, were relieved to-day by the Fifty-fourthContinue reading “The horse and the ox: Comparing the work of whites and blacks on Morris Island”