Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 1

Ohio provided twenty-six numbered independent batteries to the Federal cause during the Civil War.  As mentioned in last week’s post, two of those twenty-six were discontinued before the middle of the war.  That leaves us, for the purposes of the third quarter, 1863’s summary statement, just twenty-four batteries to account for.   So two batches of a dozen.  Let’s look at the first twelve:

0281_1_Snip_OH_Ind_1

Seven of the twelve submitted returns.  And we see service from Washington, D.C. all the way west to Little Rock, Arkansas:

  • 1st Battery: No report. Captain James R. McMullin commanded this battery, supporting the Third Division (Scammon’s), Department/Army of West Virginia, then based at Charleston, West Virginia.  Most likely the battery retained four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles received just after the battle of Antietam, a year earlier.
  • 2nd Battery: No return.  This battery was assigned to Third Division, Thirteenth Corps.  During the summer months, the battery followed its parent formation to New Orleans and became part of the Department of the Gulf.   Lieutenant Augustus Beach was promoted to captain in October 1863, and commanded the battery.  A corps-level return from September 26, 1863 indicates the battery had two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.  Captain William S. Williams remained in command.  The battery remained at Vicksburg through April 1864.  Williams served as division artillery chief.  So on some order of battles Lieutenant Thomas J. Blackburn appears in command of the battery.
  • 4th Battery:  No return.  The battery was assigned to First Division, Fifteenth Corps.  After the battle of Jackson, Mississippi, the battery followed its parent formation back to the Big Black River and spent most of the summer there.  At the end of September, the battery was among those forces dispatched to reinforce Chattanooga. When Captain Louis Hoffman resigned at the end of June, George Froehlich took his place, and was advanced to captain.  The battery likely retained two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.  This mix would change in December, as the battery received replacements from what was left behind on Missionary Ridge.
  • 5th Battery:  At Little Rock, Arkansas with two 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James rifles.  With Captain Andrew Hickenlooper serving as the Seventeenth Corps’ Chief Engineer, Lieutenants John D. Burner and, later, Anthony B. Burton led this battery.  The battery served in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps and remained around Vicksburg through the early summer.  The battery was among the forces detached for Steele’s Expedition to Little Rock in August.  And thence became part of the garrison of that place.
  • 6th  Battery:  Reporting from Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain Cullen Bradley remained in command of the battery, which was assigned to First Division, Twenty-First Corps.  The battery saw heavy action at Chickamuauga, as evidenced in Bradley’s very detailed report.  On September 19 the guns fired 209 rounds, “of this some 20 rounds were canister” attesting to the range at which the fighting occurred.  All told the battery fired 336 rounds in the battle.
  • 7th Battery: No return.  Captain Silas A. Burnap remained commander.  The battery was assigned to Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps through August, 1863. However, the battery moved with its parent division as reorganizations occurred later in the summer, temporarily listed in the Thirteenth Corps before finally moving to the Seventeenth Corps.  The battery participated in the campaign to Jackson in July and was later moved to Natchez, where it stayed through November.  In the first quarter, the battery reported four 3.80-inch James Rifles.
  • 8th Battery: Reporting in January 1864 as at Vicksburg, Mississippi (with the annotation of “positions in Fort ????”).  The battery had two 30-pdr Parrotts (not listed, as those were not considered field artillery).  Commanded by Captain James F. Putnam, this battery was assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps.  After Vicksburg, one section was sent with the expedition to Jackson. But the rest of the summer was spent at Vicksburg. In September, the battery transferred to First Division, Seventeenth Corps.
  • 9th Battery: Tullahoma, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. The battery was commanded by Captain Harrison B. York and assigned to the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.  The battery was among the forces arrayed to protect the Army of the Cumberland’s supply lines.  The battery was at Murfreesboro until September 5, and then moved forward to Tullahoma.  At that position, the battery inherited two 24-pdr siege guns (which would not appear on our field artillery listings for this quarter).
  • 10th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Under Captain Hamilton B. White, the battery remained with Sixth (later First) Division, Seventeenth Corps. Aside from the Jackson campaign, The battery remained at Vicksburg until April 1864.
  • 11th Battery: No report. Was part of the Seventh Division, Seventeenth Corps. Captain Frank C. Sands was commander (though Lieutenant Fletcher E. Armstrong appears on some returns, with Sands on detail away from the battery). The battery was among the troops assigned to Steele’s Little Rock Expedition in August 1863.  The battery had a mix of two (or three according to some reports) 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and one (or two) rifled 6-pdr guns.
  • 12th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Aaron C. Johnson commanded this battery.  Having lost their posting with the Army of the Potomac, the battery remained at the Artillery Camp of Instruction through the summer.  In late September, the battery received assignment back to the Eleventh Corps, then moving west to reinforce Chattanooga.

Thus of the five batteries not reporting, and the 8th Battery without any tallies, we can at least pencil in what should have been on those lines.  With a few reservations, of course.

Turning next to the ammunition, the smoothbore columns reflect the varied armament of these batteries:

0283_1_Snip_OH_Ind_1

Four batteries reporting:

  • 3rd Battery: 70 shot, 40 case, and 56 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 5th Battery: 5 shot, 633 case, and 154 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 102 shell, and 230 case for 12-pdr field howitzers.  (See comment below.)
  • 6th Battery: 42 shot, 65 shell, 64 case, and 72 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 9th Battery: 104 shot, 153 shell, 307 case, and 223 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

5th Battery had a pair of 12-pdr field howitzers on hand the previous quarter.  It appears they still had ammunition to report, even after turning in the howitzers.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, first we have the Hotchkiss type:

0283_2_Snip_OH_Ind_1

Interesting that we see a good number of rounds for the James calibers:

  • 3rd Battery: 113 percussion shell and 112 fuse shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 5th Battery: 60 percussion shell and 80 fuse shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 9th Battery: 85 canister, 50 percussion shell, 135 fuse shell, and 150 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 20 shot and 104 fuse shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 12th Battery: 120 canister, 502 fuse shell, and 403 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

I’ll break up the next page for clarity, starting with a left-over set of Hotchkiss entries:

0284_1H_Snip_OH_Ind_1

  • 3rd Battery: 69 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch James.
  • 10th Battery: 325 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch James.

Then to the James (actual) columns:

0284_1J_Snip_OH_Ind_1

  • 3rd Battery: 15 shot and 35 shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 5th Battery: 4 shot, 123 shell, and 87 canister for 3.80-inch James.
  • 10th Battery: 120 shell for 3.80-inch James.

Only one battery reported Parrotts on hand:

0284_1P_Snip_OH_Ind_1

  • 6th Battery: 351 shell, 90 case, and 53 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Then completing this assortment of projectiles, we turn to the Schenkl columns:

0284_2_Snip_OH_Ind_1

  • 5th Battery: 11 shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 10th Battery: 204 shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 12th Battery: 167 shell for 3-inch rifles.

And note, the 5th Battery could look in their chests to find Hotchkiss, James, and Schenkl projectiles.  Not to mention a few left over 12-pdr field howitzer rounds.  Enough to make a good ordnance officer wince!

Last we have the small arms:

0284_3_Snip_OH_Ind_1

By Battery:

  • 3rd Battery: Twenty-three army revolvers and eight cavalry sabers.
  • 5th Battery: Seven navy revolvers and seven cavalry sabers.
  • 6th Battery: Ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 9th Battery: Thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Two army revolvers and six cavalry sabers.
  • 12th Battery: Twelve army revolvers, four cavalry sabers, and twenty horse artillery sabers.

We’ll look at the other half of the Ohio independent batteries in the next installment.

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Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Ohio Light Artillery

The 1st Ohio LIGHT Artillery…. which needs to be emphasized, as there was a 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery.  The “heavy” regiment spent most of the war in garrison locations across Kentucky and Tennessee.  The “light” regiment, on the other hand, was active in the field supporting armies in both eastern and western theaters. Colonel of the regiment was James Barnett, who also doubled as the Chief of Artillery, Department/Army of the Cumberland.

For the second quarter of 1863, the clerks in Washington complied reports from nine of twelve batteries:

0217_1_Snip_Ohio_1st

And, as a bonus, we have a line for the 32nd Ohio Infantry and their four cannon.  As mentioned while discussing the independent batteries, the clerks opted to misplace what would become the 26th Independent Battery with the 1st Ohio Light.

Putting that on hold for the moment, let us look at the administrative details for the 1st Ohio Light:

  • Battery A: Reported, as of August 1864, at Tullahoma, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Wilbur F. Goodspeed remained in command of this battery assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • Battery B: “In the field” with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   Remaining under Captain William E. Standart, this battery was part of Second Division, Twenty-First Corps (with Standart also serving as division chief of artillery). The battery remained at Cripple Creek, Tennessee until June 24, when it moved with the rest of the division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery C: At Elk River, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Daniel K. Southwick commanded the battery assigned to Third Division, Fourteenth Corps.  The battery supported its parent division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery D: No report. Battery D was, as of the June 30 reporting date, in the field supporting the Cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland, supporting different operations and operating by sections.  One section, under Captain Andrew J. Konkle supported Second Brigade, First Division, of the corps.  Another, under Lieutenant Nathaniel M. Newell, supported First Brigade, Second Division.  A third section supported the cavalry of the Twenty-third Corps, Department of the Ohio, under Lieutenant Henry C. Lloyd. The battery was armed with 3-inch Ordnance rifles.
  • Battery E: No report. This battery was assigned to Second Division, Reserve Corps, still recovering from heavy losses the previous winter at Stones River.  It was posted to Nashville through the spring.  Lieutenant Stephen W. Dorsey remained in command of the battery.  Later in July, the battery moved forward to Chattanooga.  Captain Warren P. Edgarton, of the battery, was in command of the Nashville garrison artillery.
  • Battery F: No report. Captain Daniel T. Cockerill remained in command of this battery, part of Second Division, Twenty-first Corps. Consolidated reports, complied at the department, indicate the battery had six 12-pdr Napoleons and five 3.80-inch James Rifles (!).
  • Battery G: At Decherd, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Alexander Marshall’s battery assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  As such, they were involved with the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery H: At Brownsville, Maryland (likely a location associated with the August 7th report date) with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Although Captain James F. Huntington held the command billet, Lieutenant George W. Norton lead the battery in the field.  Transferred to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac in late spring.  Thus, instead sitting at the base of South Mountain on June 30, Battery H was north of Frederick, Maryland.
  • Battery I: At Emmitsburg, Maryland with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Hubert Dilger’s battery was assigned to Eleventh Corps.  Dilger and his battery would do good work supporting the left of the corps on July 1.
  • Battery K: Bridgeport, Alabama, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain William L. De Beck resigned on May 11, 1863, and was replaced by Captain Lewis Heckman.  This battery supported Eleventh Corps.  On July 1, the battery went into action just on the edge of Gettysburg (corner of Carlisle Street and Lincoln Avenue today).  Heckman reported firing 113 rounds that day, “mostly canister”, in an effort to delay the Confederate advance. The battery lost two men killed, eleven men wounded, nine horses, and two pieces.  The location is valid for later in the fall when the battery, along with the rest of the Eleventh Corps, reinforced Chattanooga.
  • Battery L: “In the field” with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Frank C. Gibbs had command of this battery, supporting Fifth Corps.  The battery played a vital role defending Little Round Top on July 2, 1863.
  • Battery M: Stevenson, Alabama with two 3-inch guns and four 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Frederick Schultz commanded this battery, assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  Thus, instead of being just south of Bridgeport, Alabama, as indicated on this line, the battery was further north, near Hoover’s Gap, on June 30, 1863.

As mentioned, one line from outside the regiment:

  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  Company F, 32nd Ohio was originally formed in August 1861.  In July 1862, the company was detached for service as artillery and known as “Potts’s Ohio Battery” after it’s first commander, Captain Benjamin F. Potts.  The battery served in the Shenandoah and was caught up in the surrender at Harpers Ferry in September 1862.  The battery was exchanged, along with the rest of the regiment, on January 21, 1863.  The 32nd was then assigned to Third Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, then in operations against Vicksburg.   At Champion’s Hill, the brigade captured a Confederate battery.  The division commander, Major General John A. Logan, knowing of the unit’s artillery service, assigned the captured guns to Company F.  Under Captain Theobold D. Yost, they were called “Yost’s Captured Battery” and were posted opposite Fort Hill in the Vicksburg siege lines.  After the siege, the battery was broken up, with men assigned to other batteries.  However, in December 1863, the battery was officially reformed as the 26th (Independent) Ohio Battery.  The exact identification of the guns assigned to the battery during the siege, being captured from Confederates, is open for interpretation.

From top to bottom, including the battery formed from the 32nd, we see all these batteries experienced active field service that summer.

Moving to the ammunition pages, we see a busy section for smoothbore projectiles:

0219_1_Snip_Ohio_1st

A pyramid of rounds:

  • Battery A: 56 shot, 64 shell, 108 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery B: 40 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery C: 13 shot, 42 case, and 46 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 96 shot, 82 shell, 96 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 77 shot for 6-pdr field guns; 211 shot, 64 shell, 128 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 143 case and 46 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery I: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery K: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L: 300 shot, 102 shell, 280 case, and 117 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 17 shell and 20 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Two flags to consider with this list.  Battery C didn’t have 6-pdrs at this stage of the war, having turned those in sometime in January.  But the rounds, theoretically, could be fired from their James rifles.  So those might have simply been residual ammunition left over from earlier service… or service ammunition set aside for special use with the rifles.

Battery G had no use at all for 6-pdr rounds.  And use of howitzer rounds in Napoleons would be puzzling.  So this escapes any simple conjecture.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, we consider the Hotchkiss columns:

0219_2_Snip_Ohio_1st

Two calibers in play here – 3-inch and 3.80-inch:

  • Battery A: 90 shot for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 20 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 109 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 77 canister, 96 percussion shell, and 120 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; Also 121 percussion shell for 3.80-inch rifles!!!
  • Battery K: 98 canister and 643 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 56 canister, 115 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; And 75 shot, 56 fuse shell, and 180 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 107 fuse shell and 451 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

As Battery G had no use for James caliber projectiles, the quantities of that caliber on hand may have been a transcription error by the clerks.  But where to put 121 percussion shells, I don’t know.

The next page offers a mix of Hotchkiss, Dyer’s, and James projectiles.

0220_1A_Snip_Ohio_1st

Taking these in turn, first the “left over” Hotchkiss columns:

  • Battery A: 140 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 148 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 94 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Here again we see Battery G with James-caliber projectiles… but no James rifles on hand.

Dyer’s projectiles:

  • Battery G: 96 shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

We don’t often see Dyer’s projectiles issued to batteries in the western theater.

James’ projectiles:

  • Battery C: 102 shot and 61 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Turning to the Shenkl columns on the next page:

0220_2_Snip_Ohio_1st

Five batteries reported quantities:

  • Battery A: 318 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 240 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 239 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 349 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 278 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Two batteries reported Tatham’s canister:

  • Battery B: 180 canister for 3.80-inch.
  • Battery M: 66 canister for 3.80-inch.

Lastly we move to the small arms:

0220_3_Snip_Ohio_1st

By battery:

  • Battery A: Three Navy revolvers, two cavalry sabers, and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Twenty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Just eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: Nine Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Army revolvers and thirty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Twelve Navy revolvers and thirty-four horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Twelve Army revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Nineteen Navy revolvers and thirty-four (?) foot artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Seven Army revolvers and three (?) cavalry sabers.

Closing out the Ohio batteries, we find that at the closing date for the second quarter, 1863, all of the 1st Light Regiment were well employed.  And we must also add the fine work by Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry to that list.

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 2

Picking up where we left off with the last post, we proceed through Ohio’s independent batteries for the second quarter of 1863.  Looking at the “lower half” of those:

0209_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

As mentioned last week, there were twenty-six numbered independent batteries.  Only twenty-five appear on this list.  The last, the 26th Independent Battery, was Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry.  And we’ll see them tallied on a later page of the summaries.  For now, we have the 13th through the 25th:

 

  • 13th Battery: “Not in service.”  This battery ceased to exist, officially, in April 1862.
  • 14th Battery: Reporting, as of August, 1863, at Corinth, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. However, at the end of June, the battery part of the District of Jackson (though at Lynnville, Tennessee), Thirteenth Corps.   Lieutenant Homer H. Stull was the commander “in the field” with the battery.  But Stull died in May.  Captain Jerome B. Burrows returned later in the spring.
  • 15th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns.  Captain Edward Spear, Jr. remained in command.  The battery was in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps, and serving in the siege of the city.
  • 16th Battery: Reporting on September 25, 1863 as at Carrollton, Louisiana with one  6-pdr field gun, one 12-pdr Napoleon, and three 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain (promoted that spring) Russell P. Twist remained in command.  The battery was with Twelfth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  As such it was involved with the Vicksburg siege at the end of June 1863.
  • 17th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with six 10-pdr Parrotts. The battery was assigned to Tenth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  Captain Ambrose A. Blount remained in command through the much Vicksburg Campaign, but resigned on July 2.  Lieutenant Charles S. Rice was promoted to replace Blount.
  • 18th Battery: Reporting at Tullahoma, Tennessee with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Aleshire’s battery was in First Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • 19th Battery: As of January 1864, reporting at Knoxville, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery remained at Lexington, Kentucky through the first weeks of June.  After which, Captain Joseph C. Shields’ battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan.  The battery was officially in the District of Central Kentucky.   Later, in July, the battery was placed in First Division, Twenty-third Corps.
  • 20th Battery: Reporting, in June 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  The armament is fine.  But for June 1863 the battery was involved with the Tullahoma Campaign, and thus somewhere near Hoover Gap at the end of the quarter.  The battery remained under Captain [John T.] Edward Grosskopff  and assigned to assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps.
  • 21st Battery: No report.  The battery remained at Camp Dennison, Ohio, presumably still with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain James W. Patterson, commanding.  The battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan in July.
  • 22nd Battery: No report.  After organizing, the battery moved briefly to Wheeling, West Virginia (to counter resistance to the draft), with only two guns.  In mid-June the battery moved back to Camp Chase, Ohio, where two more guns were assigned.  Caliber not reported.  Commanded by Captain Henry M. Niel.
  • 23rd Battery: “Not in service.” This battery was formed from the 2nd Kentucky Infantry and later became the 1st Kentucky Independent Light Battery. Only mentioned here due to “placeholder” status.
  • 24th Battery:  No report. Not mustered until August 1863.  However, the battery does appear as assigned to the Department of Ohio with Lieutenant James W. Gamble assigned command of recruits gathered at Camp Dennison.
  • 25th Battery: Reporting from Little Rock, Arkansas, in May 1864, with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and four 3.67-inch rifles (replacing four 6-pdr smoothbores from the previous quarter).  In June 1863 the battery moved from Rolla to Pilot Knob, Missouri.  There the battery became part of the force that would advance on Little Rock in August.  Captain Julius L. Hadley was in command.

So of thirteen numbers, eight were posted to active departments.  Three were forming up.  And two were just administrative placeholders.

Turning to the smoothbore ammunition on hand:

 

0211_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five batteries reporting:

  • 14th Battery: 148 shot, 48 shell, 150 case, and 50 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 15th Battery: 233 shot, 123 case, and 220 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 16th Battery: 46 shot, 90 case, and 26 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 61 shot, 54 shell, 106 case, and 26 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 74 shot, 251 shell, 293 case, and 234 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: 62 shot, 41 shell, 34 case, and 34 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, first the Hotchkiss patents:

0211_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five lines:

  • 14th Battery: 147(?) canister, 385 percussion shell, and 276 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 190 shot and 120 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 246 canister, 115 percussion shell, 694 fuse shell, and 493 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 148(?) canister, 214 percussion shell, and 365 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 410 shot, 360 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles.

Notice the 25th Battery did not report Hotchkiss rounds for their 3-inch rifles.

Continuing to the next page, there are a couple of stray Hotchkiss columns and Dyer’s patent:

0212_1A_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Hotchkiss first:

  • 16th Battery: 104 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 160 Hotchkiss canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

Dyers:

  • 25th Battery: 172 Dyer’s shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the James columns:

0212_1B_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Just one:

  • 16th Battery: 50 shell and 450 case for 3.80-inch rifles.

Then on to the Parrott projectiles:

0212_1C_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

A lonely entry:

  • 17th Battery: 240 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

This begs the question as to what Blount’s battery was firing at Vicksburg.

One line from the Schenkl columns:

0212_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

  • 25th Battery: 159 shell and 80 canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

The 25th had a variety of projectiles for the rifled 6-pdrs, but apparently only shrapnel for the 3-inch rifles!

Lastly the small arms:

0212_3_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

By battery:

  • 14th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: Twenty-five Navy revolvers and twenty-two cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Nine Army revolvers.
  • 18th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers, three cavalry sabers, and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 20th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twenty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • 25th Battery: Six “Rifled muskets, foreign manufacture”, twenty-six Navy revolvers, and fourteen cavalry sabers.

From the previous quarter, the 25th Battery reported Belgian rifles.

Next we will look at the 1st Ohio Light Artillery’s batteries.

 

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – 5th Regiment, US Regulars

We move now to the Fifth US Artillery, which will complete our look through the Regulars for second quarter, 1863.  For the reporting period in question, every battery of the regiment had something recorded.  Though, that was not always cannon on hand.  Three of the battery reports arrived at the Ordnance Department in 1864 or 1865.  Otherwise, the Fifth appeared to have their paperwork in order.  So let’s see if that was simply a false front:

0168_1_Snip_5thUS

Walking through the rows:

  • Battery A: At Portsmouth, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  During the spring, Battery A transferred, with parent organization, to Seventh Corps.  Under the new arrangements, Lieutenant James Gilliss’ battery supported Second Division of that corps.  The battery had been at Suffolk, Virginia, but was moving over to the Peninsula for Dix’s brief demonstration toward Richmond in late June.
  • Battery B:  Reporting at Hagerstown, Maryland with no artillery!  Battery B was at Fort Hamilton through much of the spring, completing its training and such.  In June, Lieutenant Henry A. Du Pont led the battery, reporting to First Division, Department of the Susquehanna, within the Middle Department’s Eighth Corps.  And the battery reported there with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.
  • Battery C: Technically off by one day, the battery reported at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  With Captain Dunbar R. Ransom taking command of the 1st Brigade of the Artillery Reserve (Army of the Potomac), Lieutenant Gulian V. Weir assumed command of this battery.
  • Battery D: Bealton, Virginia (?) with six 10-pdr Parrotts.  Lieutenant Charles Hazlett’s battery supported Fifth Corps. The battery’s location on June 30 of the year was, of course, in the vicinity of Union Mills, Maryland.  And, as many readers are well familiar, Hazlett’s tenure in command was to end a couple days later as he defended Little Round Top.  Lieutenant Benjamin Rittenhouse was his able replacement.
  • Battery E: At Fort Hamilton, New York but without cannons.  As with Battery B above, Battery E completed its training and organization during the spring.  And like that sister battery, Battery E was transferred to the Department of the Susquehanna in June.  Lieutenant James W. Piper was in command.  The battery had six 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery F: No location given, but with six 10-pdr Parrotts.  The proper location, we know, was with Sixth Corps, around Manchester, Maryland.  Lieutenant Leonard Martin commanded this battery, which would defend Cemetery Hill on July 3.
  • Battery G: Port Hudson, Louisiana with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Lieutenant  Jacob B. Rawles commanded this battery from Second Division, Nineteenth Corps.
  • Battery H: Tullahoma, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts.  This was “flip” from the previous quarter, which I believe is in error.  The battery likely had four Napoleons and two Parrotts at this stage of the war. Captain George A. Kensel assumed command of the battery in mid-spring.  And the battery remained with First Division, Fourteenth Corps.
  • Battery I: Reporting at West Point, New York with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. But we know that location is in error, possibly reflecting the 1865 report receipt date.   On June 30, Lieutenant Malbone F. Watson’s battery was with Fifth Corps along Pipe Creek.  Watson would lose a leg while leading his battery at Gettysburg on July 2.  Lieutenant Charles C. MacConnell took his place.
  • Battery K: No location given, but with four 12-pdr Napoleons. Another battery which we know was on the road to Gettysburg.  Lieutenant David H. Kinzie remained in command, but the battery transferred to the Twelfth Corps’ artillery.
  • Battery L: Reporting at Maryland Heights, Maryland with two 6-pdr field guns. Lieutenant Edmund D. Spooner’s battery was caught up in the disaster at Winchester, Virginia.  According to Spooner, eighteen men, armed only with sabers, escaped capture (having lost six Ordnance Rifles).  What remained of the battery reported to Camp Barry, which I’d submit is a more accurate location.  The report of two 6-pdrs points to some interesting inferences.
  • Battery M: At Warrenton, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. This location might be accurate for August, when the report was received. But at the end of June 1863 the battery was around Yorktown and was involved with Dix’s demonstration there. Captain James McKnight’s battery was assigned to Fourth Corps.

So we see the batteries of the Fifth Regiment were actively engaged across the board.  No easy garrison duty for those gunners!

Moving down the return… or more accurately, turning the page, we look at the smoothbore ammunition reported:

0170_1_Snip_5thUS

With the majority of the regiment’s batteries armed with Napoleons, we see those columns well populated:

  • Battery A: 192 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 192 canister for Napoleons.
  • Battery C: 465 shot, 162(?) shell, 369 case, and 100 canister for Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 217 shot, 352 shell, 438 case, and 132 canister for Napoleons.
  • Battery H: 172 shot, 64 shell, 171 case, and 100 canister for Napoleons.
  • Battery K:  36 shot, 5 shell, and 3 case for Napoleons.
  • Battery M:  288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for Napoleons.

The line that stands out is for Battery K.  Might those be the quantities on hand at the close of July 3, 1863?

Battery E probably had ammunition for its Napoleons on hand, but not reflecting on this report.

Spooner’s hard-luck, fought-out battery with their 6-pdrs reported:

  • Battery L: 96 shot, 56 case, and 48 canister for 6-pdr field guns.

Moving now to the rifled projectiles, there were two batteries with 3-inch Ordnance Rifles, but only one of which offered a full report.  Even with that, the Hotchkiss columns were noticeably short:

0170_2_Snip_5thUS

With Battery B still “new” and not fully reporting, only Battery I had Hotchkiss entries:

  • Battery I: 100 canister and 400 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

For the next page, we can narrow the review down to three batteries with Parrott rifles:

0171_1A_Snip_5thUS

Those three were:

  • Battery D: 320 shell, 500 case, and 48 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery F: 480 shell, 480 case, and 144 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery H: 240 shell, 54 case, and 94 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

And the next page, there were quantities of Schenkl projectiles reported:

0171_2_Snip_5thUS

Two entries for Parrott batteries and one for the 3-inch battery:

  • Battery D: 360 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery F: 120 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery I:  300 shell for 3-inch rifles.

Overall, the two “pure” Parrott batteries seemed well provisioned.  Battery H, which was mixed, might be a little lean.  And Battery I, with its 3-inch rifles, seemed a bit short.  But that might, again, be due to what the battery did during those first days of July.

That leaves us the small arms to consider… and a lot to consider:

0171_3_Snip_5thUS

Yes, a FULL slate of small arms reported:

  • Battery A: Twenty-two Army revolvers and sixty-five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B:  A hundred Army revolvers and 138 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Fifty-five Army revolvers and nineteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D: Thirteen Navy revolvers, fifteen cavalry sabers, and thirty-seven horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery E: Twelve Army revolvers and 107 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F: Twenty-four Army revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: Twenty-one horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Sixteen Navy revolvers, five cavalry sabers, and thirty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Twenty-one Army revolvers and thirty-five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Fifty-eight Army revolvers and sixteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Nothing… not even the sabers reported carried off the field at Winchester.
  • Battery M: Twenty-four Navy revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.

We again must keep in mind the time frame and context.  These numbers on the sheet were cannon, ammunition, and small arms which would be put to use by these batteries in June and July 1863.