Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 1

From that long page of New York entries for the third quarter, 1863 summaries, we have thirty-three lines covering the independent batteries from the state:

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Some of these are simply placeholder lines for batteries either mustered out or being mustered in.  Still a notable measure of New York’s support of the war… in terms of men.  All told, New York designated a total of thirty-six of these “independent” batteries.  Convenient for blog posting as I can split this discussion into three parts of a dozen each.  For the third quarter, the first part, covering 1st through 12th New York Independent Batteries, includes eight received returns.  Only five of which were received by the end of the year:

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A lot of Culpeper County addresses for those batteries:

  • 1st Independent Battery: In Culpeper, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.   Captain Andrew Cowan remained in command of the battery, assigned to Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac.
  • 2nd Independent Battery:  No return.  The battery mustered out, in New York, on June 13, 1863.  The men with time left on their enlistments transferred to Battery I, 1st New York.  Captain Wolfgang Bock had authority to recruit a reorganized 2nd Independent Battery.  On October 14, that authority was revoked and men recruited into the new 2nd were instead was made part of the 15th New York Heavy Artillery.
  • 3rd Independent Battery: Also in Culpeper, Virginia but with six 10-pdr Parrotts. The battery was part of Sixth Corps, under Lieutenant William A. Harn.
  • 4th Independent Battery: No return.  Recall Captain James E. Smith’s battery lost three 10-pdr Parrotts on July 2 at Gettysburg (and one of those was on a disabled carriage).   During that battle, the 4th was assigned to Third Corps.  But on July 31st, the battery shows up on the returns for the Department of Washington, assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, Camp Barry.  Smith’s battery returned to the Army of the Potomac in August, assigned to First Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve. And on a monthly report dated August 31, the battery had six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Smith took leave around that time. Lieutenant Thomas Goodman, and later Lieutenant William T. McLean, held command of the battery in Smith’s absence.  And, of course, with the assignment to the Reserve Artillery the battery was in Culpeper at the end of September.
  • 5th Independent Battery: And another battery reporting from Culpeper.  with six 20-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Elijah D. Taft remained in command of this battery, in the Second Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve.
  • 6th Independent Battery: For a slight change, reporting at Brandy Station, Virginia, and with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Joseph W. Martin held command of this battery, assigned to the First Brigade, Horse Artillery, Army of the Potomac.  And Martin, having fought hard at Fleetwood Hill earlier in June, certainly knew Brandy Station quite well!
  • 7th Independent Battery: At Norfolk, Virginia with two 12-pdr Napoleons (down from three) and six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Peter C. Regan’s battery supported the Seventh Corps.
  • 8th Independent Battery: At Gloucester Point, Virginia with  six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Butler Fitch commanded this battery.  In the previous quarter, the battery reported specific assignment to Fort Keyes in the defenses of Gloucester Point.
  • 9th Independent Battery: Fort Reno, District of Columbia, with only infantry stores. Captain Emil Schubert remained in command.  Battery assigned to the Twenty-Second Corps, defending Washington.  Originally Company F, 41st New York Infantry, it was equipped as artillery and formally redesignated as an independent battery in December 1861.  As indicated, the battery was not equipped as light artillery.
  • 10th Independent Battery: Marked “not in service.”  In the previous quarter, we discussed how this battery was broken up in June, with men mustering out or transferred to other batteries: 1st New Hampshire Battery; Battery E, 1st Massachusetts; and Batteries C and G, 1st Rhode Island.  A detachment remained, udner Lieutenant Charles T. Bruen, and served in the Washington Defenses through June of 1864.
  • 11th Independent Battery: No return.  On, or about June 16, what remained of the battery was attached to Battery K, 1st New York Light.  Captain John E. Burton was busy bringing this battery back up to strength (which he would not complete until the end of the year).
  • 12th Independent Battery: At Brandy Station, Virginia reporting six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. This battery transferred to Third Corps, being among the troops Major General William French brought over.  Captain George F. McKnight remained in command.

Very clean, from an administrative standpoint.

We turn to the smoothbore ammunition reported:

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Two batteries:

  • 5th Battery: 91 canister for 6-pdr.
  • 7th Battery: 41 shot, 46 shell, 89 case, and 65 canister for 12-pdr Napoleon.

The bore diameter for 20-pdr Parrotts was 3.67-inches.  The bore diameter for 6-pdr field guns was also 3.67-inches.  Apparently we are seeing, in a pinch, that Taft’s battery received smoothbore ammunition when supplies of proper Parrott canister ran low.  At least that’s the inference the data leads us to.

Turning to the Hotchkiss page:

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Five lines to consider:

  • 1st Battery: 120 canister, 7 percussion shell, 3 fuse shell, and 435 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 6th Battery: 93 canister, 10 fuse shell, and 128 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery: 147 canister, 60 percussion shell, 228 fuse shell, and 619 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 8th Battery: 175 canister and 70 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery: 60 canister, 65 percussion shell, 126 fuse shell, and 116 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

We’ll break the next page down into sections for clarity, starting with Dyer’s Patent projectiles:

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And just one of those:

  • 8th Battery: 321 shell and 650(?) shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

To the right of those are the Parrott columns:

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Two lines:

  • 3rd Battery: 502 shell, 502 case, and 177 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 5th Battery: 3 shell and 42 case for 20-pdr Parrott.

Yes, no Parrott canister for the 5th Battery.

More rounds on the Schenkl page:

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Like a canister blast across the page:

  • 1st Battery: 217 shell and 420 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: 67 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 5th Battery: 216 shell and 248 case for 20-pdr Parrott.
  • 6th Battery: 654 shell and 4 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • 8th Battery: 353 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery:  250 case for 3-inch rifles.

The projectiles in the chests accounted for, we turn to the small arms:

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By battery:

  • 1st Battery: Twenty Navy revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • 3rd Battery: Four Navy revolvers and ten cavalry sabers.
  • 5th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twenty-one horse artillery sabers.
  • 6th Battery: 119 Navy revolvers and ten cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery: Eighteen Navy revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • 8th Battery: Thirteen Navy revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • 12th Battery: Twenty-eight Army revolvers and twenty-nine cavalry sabers.

That’s the first dozen of these New York Independent Batteries.  Next up is the middle set.

 

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