“Do see that my poor, distressed family is taken care of”: The case of Julian M. Burnett, cought up in the war

Before the Civil War, Julian Moses Burnett farmed just outside of Brunswick, Georgia.  According to the 1860 census, 31 year old Julian lived with his wife, Julia, his young daughter (also Julia), and his mother, Margaret.  Julian was a man of some means, with $2,500 in real estate and a $5,000 personal estate.  And asContinue reading ““Do see that my poor, distressed family is taken care of”: The case of Julian M. Burnett, cought up in the war”

“Such wretched condition that they could not be relied on”: Assessment of Confederate steamers in Charleston

It almost goes without mention that the Federal efforts outside Charleston, even when acting defensively, relied upon waterborne transport.  The logistics of supporting a force on those barrier islands required substantial lift capacity – moving materials from the northern ports to Hilton Head and thence throughout the theater to required points.  And those transportation assets,Continue reading ““Such wretched condition that they could not be relied on”: Assessment of Confederate steamers in Charleston”

James Pike – Soldier and POW? Or Sabatour and spy?

At the end of the Civil War, James Pike, of the 4th Ohio Cavalry, wrote an account of his exploits, titled “The Scout and Ranger: Being the Personal Adventures of Corporal Pike.” The front piece plug is perhaps the best argument for adding this to your reading list: As a Texan ranger, in the IndianContinue reading “James Pike – Soldier and POW? Or Sabatour and spy?”