Intelligence forwarded by wig-wag: Signal Stations as Observation Posts

Consider this exchange of messages filed by Captain Lemuel Norton’s signal stations on February 24, 1864: Pony Mountain, February 24, 1864–10.40 a.m. Captain Norton: A brigade of infantry moving down in direction of Morton’s Ford. Bartley. —– Headquarters Army of the Potomac, February 24, 1864. Lieutenant Bartley: Watch that brigade closely. How far from Morton’sContinue reading “Intelligence forwarded by wig-wag: Signal Stations as Observation Posts”

“The Second Corps… will move to the vicinity of Morton’s Ford” – orders posted 150 years ago

Thus far discussing the 1864 Winter Encampment, I’ve offered examples of camp building, reenlistment drives, training, and other comparatively “quiet” activities.  But let us turn to a noisy military operation.  On this day (February 5) in 1864, acting commander of the Army of the Potomac, Major-General John Sedgwick, issued (reluctantly I might add) these orders:Continue reading ““The Second Corps… will move to the vicinity of Morton’s Ford” – orders posted 150 years ago”

150 years ago: Evolution of a Picket Line and Signal Station

On New Year’s Day 1864, Major-General John Newton, commanding the First Corps of the Army of the Potomac, focused his attention on the picket lines and location of signal stations south of Culpeper Court House.  Orders posted late in December 1863 had 2nd Division, under Brigadier-General John Robinson, of Newton’s corps moving up to theContinue reading “150 years ago: Evolution of a Picket Line and Signal Station”