September 6, 1864: Foster stops bombardment of Fort Sumter “for want of ammunition”

On September 6, 1864, Major-General John Foster provided a status report to the Chief of Staff, Major-General Henry Halleck, in Washington.  The update, while routine, brought several ongoing operational lines together – prisoners, health and sanitary concerns, and the bombardment of Fort Sumter.  And above all, Foster emphasized he was not engaging in offensive operations:Continue reading “September 6, 1864: Foster stops bombardment of Fort Sumter “for want of ammunition””

August 15, 1864: 600 Confederate prisoners of war to be placed under the guns

A thread I’ve tracked this summer is the handling of prisoners of war at Charleston.  The exchange of fifty senior officers at Charleston on August 3, 1864 closed the first chapter in this saga.  But at that same time, the next chapter opened.  Even as the exchange took place, the Confederates moved 600 Federal officersContinue reading “August 15, 1864: 600 Confederate prisoners of war to be placed under the guns”

August 3, 1864: Exchange of prisoners at Charleston – 5 generals and 45 field officers

On August 3, 1864, for a short time period the guns around Charleston fell silent.  The reason for the pause in the Third Major Bombardment was a flag of truce to conduct the exchange of fifty prisoners.  Five generals and forty-five field officers held in Charleston since mid-June traded places with a like number ofContinue reading “August 3, 1864: Exchange of prisoners at Charleston – 5 generals and 45 field officers”