“I have up to the present time received over 3,000 of our men”: Prisoner exchanges in November 1864 upriver from Fort Pulaski

One of the long standing myths associated with the Civil War is that Lieutenant-General U.S. Grant stopped exchanges mid-way through the war.  This normally offered as a blanket statement.  And the lack of exchanges is then cited as causing the swelling prison population.  As I’ve discussed at length during the sesquicentennial, the Federals curtailed exchangesContinue reading ““I have up to the present time received over 3,000 of our men”: Prisoner exchanges in November 1864 upriver from Fort Pulaski”

Removed to Fort Pulaski: The Immortal 600 depart Morris Island

On October 20, 1864, Major-General John Foster reported a change with the 600 prisoners held on Morris Island: I have the honor to report that since my communication of the 13th instant nothing of note has transpired in this department except the removal of the rebel prisoners of war from Morris Island, S.C., to FortContinue reading “Removed to Fort Pulaski: The Immortal 600 depart Morris Island”

“200 or 300 Union troops are working near Battery Marshall”: Confederates use POW labor at Charleston

On October 1, 1864, Rear-Admiral John Dahlgren offered this note to Major-General John Foster in regard to Confederate activity at Charleston, South Carolina: I send you some deserters from Battery Marshall, who will give you some account of the works there.  By their account, some 200 or 300 Union troops are working near Battery MarshallContinue reading ““200 or 300 Union troops are working near Battery Marshall”: Confederates use POW labor at Charleston”