Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Indiana’s Independent Batteries (Part 1)

By June 1863, Indiana had twenty-five independent batteries on the books, in one way or another.  In addition to those independent batteries, there were a couple of heavy artillery batteries with field artillery along with detachments and other miscellaneous formations.   So they covered most of a page on the summary sheets:

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We will review these in three parts, starting with the first dozen numbered independent batteries:

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Of these first twelve, only seven have recorded returns.  So let’s dive into those missing parts:

  • 1st Battery:  No report.  The battery remained with Fourteenth Division, Thirteenth Corps and was part of the siege of Vicksburg.  The battery had four (some sources say six) James rifles. Captain Martin Klauss commanded.
  • 2nd Battery:  Reporting at Springfield, Missouri with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Lieutenant Hugh Espey commanded this battery, assigned to the District of Southwestern Missouri.
  • 3rd Battery: Also indicated as at Springfield, Missouri but with two 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr Napoleons, and two 3.67-inch rifles.  Also part of the District of Southwestern Missouri, Captain James M. Cockefair commanded this battery.  The battery split duty between Springfield and Rolla during the summer.
  • 4th Battery:  No report. Last quarter found the battery at Murfreesboro, with two 12-pdr Napoleons, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and two 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Lieutenant David Flansburg command this battery, assigned to First Division, Fourteenth Corps.  So June found them participating in the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • 5th Battery: At Shell Mound, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James rifles. Shell Mound was a landing on the Tennessee River downstream from Chattanooga.  And that location was probably valid for the reporting time of February 1864.  In June 1863, the battery was with Second Division, Twentieth Corps, and part of the Tullahoma Campaign. Lieutenant Alfred Morrison remained in command, with Captain Peter Simonson the division artillery chief (temporarily at least).
  • 6th Battery: No report.  Last quarter’s returns gave the battery two 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Officially assigned to First Division, Sixteenth Corps. Captain Michael Mueller commanded. The battery had postings across west Tennessee until June, when dispatched with the rest of the division to Vicksburg.
  • 7th Battery: McMinnville, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain George R. Swallow’s battery supported Third Division, Twenty-First Corps.  So the battery was involved with the Tullahoma Campaign at the reporting time. McMinnville appears to be derived from the August report filing.
  • 8th Battery: No return. Captain George Estep retained command of this battery.  In the winter reorganizations, the battery was posted to First Division, Twenty-First Corps at Murfreesboro.  The battery had four 6-pdr field guns and two 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 9th Battery: No return. Lieutenant George R. Brown commanded this battery, assigned to Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps.  It remained part of the garrison at District of Columbus, in Kentucky.
  • 10th Battery: Reporting at Pelham, Tennessee with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Lieutenant William A. Naylor remained in command of this battery, assigned to First Division, Twenty-First Corps that winter.  At the end of June the battery was involved in the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • 11th Battery: Chattanooga, Tennessee (which was accurate for October 1863 when the report was received) with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Arnold Sutermeister’s battery supported Third Division, Twentieth Corps and was on the Tullahoma Campaign at the end of June.
  • 12th Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee as siege artillery.  Returns list the battery assigned to Fort Negley, with four 4.5-inch Ordnance siege rifles under Captain James E. White.

So we can, using the Official Records mostly, fill in most of these blanks.

Turning to the ammunition, the smoothbore columns are particularly active:

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The usual sets of 6-pdr and 12-pdr rounds:

  • 2nd Battery: 203 shot, 203 case, and 191 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 3rd Battery:  105 shot, 141 case, and 132 canister for 6-pdr field guns;  136 shot, 406 shell, 227 case, and 300 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 5th Battery: 76 shot, 24 shell, 92 case, and 33 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 7th Battery: 75 shot, 32 shell, 101 case, and 48 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 10th Battery: 115 shell, 100 case, and 116 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 11th Battery: 132 shot, 122 shell, 110 case, and 120 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the next page, we start the rifled projectiles with the Hotchkiss columns:

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Not a lot to report:

  • 5th Battery: 24 shot, 24 fuse shell, and 132 bullet shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 11th Battery: 100 canister, 140 fuse shell, and 150 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

There is one “stray” on the following page for Hotchkiss:

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  • 5th Battery: 32 canister for 3.80-inch Rifles.

Moving to the right, the James columns:

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Three batteries reporting:

  • 2nd Battery: 130 shot and 142 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: 52 shot, 273 shell, and 24 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 5th Battery:  58 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

And over to the Parrotts:

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Two batteries with Parrotts, and two reporting:

  • 7th Battery: 197 shell, 273 case, and 157 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • 10th Battery: 468 shell, 225 case, and 94 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Note to the right, there is one entry for Schenkl patent projectiles for Parrott rifles:

  • 7th Battery: 217 shot for 10-pdr Parrott.

To the last page of ammunition columns, we find two entries:

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Both for 5th Battery:

  • 5th Battery:  150 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch rifles; 40 Tatham canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Yes, 5th Battery reported canister from three different patterns to feed their James rifles (and that does not include canister for their 12-pdr Napoleons).  Would love to see a first hand account discussing those particulars.

Lastly, we have the small arms:

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By battery, of those reporting:

  • 2nd Battery: Eighteen rifles (no type specified), twenty-eight Army revolvers, and twenty-two cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery: Four Navy revolvers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 5th Battery: One percussion pistol, fourteen cavalry sabers, and seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 7th Battery: Two cavalry sabers and fifteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Eighteen Army revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • 11th Battery: Ten Army revolvers, twelve Navy revolvers, and eleven cavalry sabers.

Perhaps the 5th Indiana Battery must have been the last user of the percussion pistol?

Next we’ll pick up the bottom half of the Indiana Independent Batteries.

 

Summary Statement, 1st Quarter, 1863 – Indiana’s Batteries, Part 1

After some “time away” let me resume work on the summary statements for first quarter, 1863.  In clerk’s sequence, the next state’s batteries to review are those of Indiana.  For fourth quarter, 1862, I listed twenty-one batteries in one post.  And for the first quarter of 1863 we have twenty five batteries to consider:

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For brevity, I’ll break them down into parts this go around. In this installment, let us focus on the first twelve batteries:

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Plenty enough to discuss with those twelve:

  • 1st Battery:  No report. Through the winter, the battery was in the Department of the Missouri, District of St. Louis, in the Second Division of that district.  However, along with its parent brigade, the battery was transferred starting April 1863 to Fourteenth Division, Thirteenth Corps to join the forces operating against Vicksburg.  Captain Martin Klauss commanded.
  • 2nd Battery: Reporting at Springfield, Missouri with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Lieutenant Hugh Espey commanded this battery, assigned to the District of Southwestern Missouri.
  • 3rd Battery: Also indicated as at Springfield, Missouri but with two 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr Napoleons, and two 3.67-inch rifles. Also part of the District of Southwestern Missouri, Captain James M. Cockefair commanded this battery.
  • 4th Battery:  At Murfreesboro, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Asahel Bush retained command that spring, with assignment to Third Division, Twentieth Corps.  Later in the spring, Lieutenant David Fansburg assumed command with battery moved to First Division, Fourteenth Corps.
  • 5th Battery: At Shell Mound, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons, one 10-pdr Parrott, and one 3.80-inch James Rifle. Shell Mound was a landing on the Tennessee River downstream from Chattanooga.  And that location was probably valid for the reporting time of December 1863.  In March 1863, the battery was with Second Division, Twentieth Corps, at Murfreesboro.  Captain Peter Simonson moved up to command the division’s artillery brigade, leaving Lieutenant Alfred Morrison with the battery.
  • 6th Battery: Reporting from Lafayette, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Officially assigned to First Division, Sixteenth Corps, Captain Michael Mueller commanded. The battery had postings across west Tennessee until June, when dispatched with the rest of the division to Vicksburg.
  • 7th Battery: McMinnville, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain George R. Swallow’s battery supported Third Division, Twenty-First Corps as the Army of the Cumberland reorganized at Murfreesboro through the winter.  Though McMinnville appears to be derived from the August report filing.
  • 8th Battery: No return. Captain George Estep retained command of this battery.  In the winter reorganizations, the battery was posted to First Division, Twenty-First Corps at Murfreesboro.
  • 9th Battery: No return. Lieutenant George R. Brown commanded this battery, assigned to Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps.  It was left behind that spring to garrison the District of Columbus, in Kentucky.
  • 10th Battery: At Murfreesboro, Tennessee with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain Jerome B. Cox held command when the battery was assigned to First Division, Twenty-First Corps that winter.  Later in the spring Lieutenant William A. Naylor assumed command.
  • 11th Battery: No return. Captain Arnold Sutermeister’s battery began the winter assigned to the Army of the Cumberland’s artillery reserve at Nashville.  Spring found them assigned to Third Division, Twentieth Corps, preparing for the Tullahoma Campaign at Murfreesboro.
  • 12th Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee as siege artillery.  The fort is named, but I cannot transcribe it directly.  Returns list the battery assigned to Fort Negley, with four 4.5-inch Ordnance siege rifles under Captain James E. White.

We see seven of these twelve batteries assigned to the Army of the Cumberland.  Three were posted to Grant’s command, though only two would be active in the field for the Vicksburg Campaign.  And two were posted to southwest Missouri.  As for armament, from the batteries reporting we see six 6-pdr field guns, eight Napoleons, four 12-pdr howitzers, nine Parrotts, nine James Rifles, and two of those rifled 6-pdr “look-alikes” to the James.  The latter is interesting to flag.  We see again the artillerists and ordnance authorities indicating a difference between the 3.80-inch and 3.67-inch rifles, in the forms.

A lot of smoothbore ammunition to account for:

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As nearly every battery reporting had a smoothbore or two:

  • 2nd Battery: 241 shot, 400 case, and 191 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 3rd Battery: 105 shot, 141 case, and 132 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 136 shot, 406 shell,  227 case, and 300 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 4th Battery: 96 shot, 32 shell, 96 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 79 shell, 96 case, and 66 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 5th Battery: 96 shot, 32 shell, 94 case, and 33 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 6th Battery: 320 shot, 160 case, and 80 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 7th Battery: 24 shot, 8 shell, 28 case, and 8 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 10th Battery: 115 shell, 100 case, and 116 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

Moving to the rifled columns, we find no Hotchkiss projectiles reported on hand.  On the next page, we can focus on James and Parrott projectiles (full page posted for review):

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Looking at the James projectiles first:

  • 2nd Battery: 120 shot and 176 shell in 3.80-inch.
  • 3rd Battery: 52 shot, 273 shell, and 24 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 4th Battery: 16 shot and 12 canister for 3.80-inch.

The presented quantities beg questions.  First, 3rd Battery had 2.67-inch rifles, as tallied in the first page but apparently had 3.80-inch projectiles.  So we must assume one or the other figure is incorrect.  Second, what about 5th and 6th Batteries and their James?  Well half of that question will be answered later.

And the Parrotts:

  • 5th Battery: 145 shell and 24 canister in 2.9-inch (10-pdr).
  • 7th Battery:  210 shell and 380 case in 2.9-inch.
  • 10th Battery:  463 shell, 225 case, and 94 canister in 2.9-inch.

Here we see a nice match to the reported weapons and projectiles on hand.

Moving to columns for Schenkl’s and Tatham’s projectiles, we have half an answer to a question:

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  • 4th Battery: 205 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch rifle; 35 Tatham canister for 3.80-inch.
  • 5th Battery: 90 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch; 32 Tatham canister for 3.80-inch rifle.

So we still don’t know what the 6th Battery had on hand for its James rifles, but the 5th had Schenkl shells and Tatham canister.

Moving to the small arms:

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By battery:

  • 2nd Battery: Twenty-eight Army revolvers and twenty-eight cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery:  Three Navy revolvers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 4th Battery: Twenty-six Army revolvers and ten cavalry sabers.
  • 5th Battery: Seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 6th Battery: Twenty-four Cavalry Sabers.
  • 7th Battery: Only two cavalry sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Twenty Army revolvers and nine cavalry sabers.

An allocation of small arms within reason for artillerists assigned to, presumably, strictly artillery duties.

We’ll look at the other half of the Indiana batteries in the next installment.

Summary Statement: December 31, 1862 – Indiana’s Batteries

Time now we look to the Hoosier Artillery as reported for December 1862.  Indiana organized twenty-six light batteries for Federal service during the war, all numbered and not within a regimental system.  Twenty-one of those Indiana batteries had entry lines on the December 1862 summary.  Of those, only seven had a posted date for receipt of returns.  I’ll focus on those seven, but mention the status of the other fourteen for our purposes today.  (And note, there was a 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery Regiment serving mostly with the Department of the Gulf, that falls outside the summaries.)

Of the seven batteries with data for the form, we see all posted late. Three were received in the spring of 1863.  Three more trickled in through the summer and fall.  Then the 2nd Indiana Battery’s was received in April 1864.  All must be considered when reviewing the data presented in the summary.

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For the battery-by-battery breakdown, let us “fill in” the location and assignment for batteries without a report… just to round things out (Looking here for any patterns of the omissions).  And, for emphasis, these are all “Independent Light Artillery” batteries from Indiana, designated by sequential numbers:

  • 1st Battery: No report.  The battery was part of the short lived Army of Southeastern Missouri, operating in the Ironton area.
  • 2nd Battery: Springfield, Missouri. Three 6-pdr field guns and four James 3.80-inch rifles.  The battery was in the Army of the Frontier.
  • 3rd Battery: No report. Part of the Central District of Missouri and reported at both Rolla and St. Louis during the quarter.
  • 4th Battery: La Vernge or Lafayette (?), Tennessee.  Two 6-pdr field guns and two James 3.80-inch rifles.  The 4th was in the Right Wing, Army of the Cumberland, specifically, Sheridan’s Third Division.  The battery was in action at Stones River on December 31.  Captain Asahel Bush’s official report mentions the battery had one more cannon on hand – a field howitzer (12-pdr).  One 6-pdr and a James rifle were lost on the field.  And the other 6-pdr disabled. The battery fired 1,160 rounds in the battle.  Losses were six killed, seventeen wounded, and three captured or missing.
  • 5th Battery. No report. Was posted to Second Division (Johnson), Right Wing, Army of the Cumberland, and at Stones River.  Captain Peter Simonson mentioned two 10-pdr Parrotts and two 12-pdr Napoleons in his official report of the battle. The battery fired only 213 rounds in the battle but lost two guns.
  • 6th Battery. No report. The battery was in the multi-armed Thirteenth Corps and with McPherson’s Right Wing in northern Mississippi.
  • 7th Battery. Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  Four 10-pdr Parrotts.  The battery was in Van Cleve’s Third Division, Left Wing, Army of the Cumberland.  Captain George Swallow’s battery fired 406 rounds in the battle at Stones River, lost no guns, suffered four killed and eight wounded, along with losing one horse.
  • 8th Battery. No report.  First Division (Wood), Left Wing, Army of the Cumberland.  Lieutenant George Estep’s battery fired 871 rounds at Stones River.
  • 9th Battery. No report. Captain George Brown’s battery was assigned to Fourth Division, Right Wing, Thirteenth Corps.
  • 10th Battery: No report. Captain Jerome Cox’s battery was also assigned to First Division, Left Wing, Army of the Cumberland and at Stones River.   The battery fired 1,442 rounds during the battle.
  • 11th Battery: No report. Though assigned the Army of the Cumberland, this battery was part of the Nashville garrison.
  • 12th Battery: Fort Negley, Nashville, Tennesseee.  Annotated as “siege.”  Four 4.5-inch siege rifles.
  • 13th Battery: No report. Also annotated as a “siege” battery.  I have no particulars on this battery.  It was posted to Gallatin, outside Nashville, and some reports have it operating as cavalry.
  • 14th Battery:  Jackson, Tennessee.  Three 6-pdr field guns and one 3-inch Ordnance Rifle.  The battery was part of Thirteenth Corps at the time.
  • 15th Battery:  No report.  Had surrendered earlier in the fall at Harpers Ferry.  Was still on parole.
  • 16th Battery: Fort Pennsylvania, DC.  Three 20-pdr Parrotts and four James 3.80-inch rifles.  This battery spent most of the war defending Washington.
  • 17th Battery: No report. The 17th Battery was assigned to the Middle Department and the defenses of Baltimore.
  • 18th Battery: No report. Though assigned to the Center Wing, Army of the Cumberland, this battery was not at Stones River but rather supporting troops pursuing Confederates raiders.
  • 19th Battery:  (Illegible), Kentucky.  Four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch steel guns.  Also assigned to the Center Wing, the 19th was likewise active in pursuit of Confederate raiders at this time of the war.
  • 20th Battery: No report.  Assigned to the garrison of Henderson, Kentucky.
  • 21st Battery: No report. On duty at various locations in Kentucky.

Sorry for the lengthy interpretation, but a necessary listing for the purposes of these posts.  There are several batteries (particularly the 19th Indiana) that I’d like to discuss further. But for now let me save those for separate posts in the future.

Turning to smoothbore ammunition on hand:

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Just three batteries reporting quantities:

  • 2nd Battery:  6-pdr field gun – 8 spherical case and 191 canister.
  • 4th Battery: 6-pdr field gun – 320 shot, 160 case, and 30 canister.
  • 14th Battery: 6-pdr field gun – 328 shot, 296 case, and 68 canister.

Rifled projectiles followed to the right of the smoothbore listings, with Hotchkiss patent types:

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Three batteries reporting:

  • 2nd Battery: James 3.80-inch – 54 shot and 176 (?) bullet shell.
  • 14th Battery: 162 of Hotchkiss pattern 3-inch percussion shell.
  • 19th Battery: 3-inch rifle – 98 canister and 86 fuse shell.

Continuing to the columns for James and Parrott projectiles:

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Two batteries with quantities on hand:

  • 7th Battery:  155 Parrott 10-pdr case shot.
  • 14th Battery: James patent 3.80-inch – 188 shell, 120 case shot, and 222 canister; and 650 20-pdr Parrott shells.

Clearly a battery posted to defend the nation’s capital got plenty of ammunition!

And next those of Schenkl and Tatham’s:

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Two batteries reporting:

  • 14th Battery: 83 3-inch Schenkl shells and 45 3-inch Tatham’s canister.
  • 19th Battery: 28 3-inch Schenkl canister.

Finally, the small arms:

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All seven of the “reporting” batteries listed some small arms on hand, some more than others:

  • 2nd Battery: 134 Army revolvers and 49 cavalry sabers.
  • 4th Battery: 24 cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery: 2 cavalry sabers.
  • 12th Battery: 14 horse artillery sabers.
  • 14th Battery: 16 cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: 2 Army revolvers.
  • 19th Battery: 15 Army revolvers and 16 horse artillery sabers.

Other than the “everyone gets a revolver” in the 2nd Battery, we might consider this a “meager” allotment of sabers and pistols.

That concludes the lengthy summary of the Indiana batteries.  Keep in mind that a quarter of these batteries were in action at the end of December 1862 at Stones River.  And those batteries expended around 4,000 rounds between December 31 and January 2.  Not to mention the lost guns, equipment, horses, and lives in the battle.  What I am left wanting is a “before” and “after” accounting from those batteries of equipment.  Such would offer a measure, on paper, of the violence seen at stones River.