Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 2

Let us review the fourth quarter statements for the middle dozen New York independent “light” batteries:

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I say “light” as while on paper these were indeed light batteries, in actuality not all served as light batteries. We see nine returns processed. All within January or February 1864. Very tidy… relatively speaking:

  • 13th Independent Battery: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William Wheeler remained in command, and the battery supported the Eleventh Corps. The battery participated in the fighting around Chattanooga in November. Using borrowed horses, the battery deployed to support Sherman’s crossing on November 22. Afterwards, the battery was part of the relief column sent to Knoxville. All told, for November, Wheeler reported expenditure of “horses, 24; ammunition, 50 Schenkl percussion, 50 Hotchkiss case, 10 Hotchkiss percussion – 110 rounds” during the month of November.
  • 14th Independent Battery: No return. The battery formally disbanded in September 1863. 
  • 15th Battery:  At Brandy Station, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Patrick Hart commanded this battery, assigned to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Reserve Artillery, Army of the Potomac.
  • 16th Battery: At Newport News, Virginia with four 10-pdr Parrott Rifles. Captain Frederick L. Hiller’s battery was assigned to the Department of Virginia and North Carolina.
  • 17th Battery: In Centreville, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain George T. Anthony’s battery was at that time assigned to Tyler’s Division, the Defenses of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).
  • 18th Battery: No return. Captain Albert G. Mack’s battery remained with Nineteenth Corps, and posted to the defenses of New Orleans. Around the first of the year, the battery transferred to Baton Rouge. Likely the battery retained four 20-pdr Parrotts. 
  • 19th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, Twenty-second Corps.  Captain Edward W. Rogers remained in command.
  • 20th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, with no cannon (instead, they reported muskets on hand).  Captain Benjamin Franklin Ryer’s battery served as garrison artillery in the defenses of New York.  At the end of December, returns indicated Lieutenant Arthur Weicker led the battery in Ryer’s absence.
  • 21st Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with four 3-inch steel guns (make and model unspecified). After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery remained at that post, as part of the Reserve Artillery of the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain James Barnes remained in command.
  • 22nd Battery: No return. Earlier in February 1863 the battery became Company M, 9th New York Heavy Artillery.  The designation remained on the clerk’s report as a placeholder.
  • 23rd Battery: Washington, North Carolina with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. With Captain Alfred Ransom on leave, Lieutenant Thomas Low led the battery at the close of the year. The 23rd was assigned to the Sub-District of Pamlico, District of North Carolina, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.
  • 24th Battery: At Plymouth, North Carolina with six 12-pdr Napoleons. This battery was assigned to the Sub-District of Albemarle, District of North Carolina, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.  Captain A. Lester Cady remained in command.

Those particulars providing the context, we move to the ammunition pages, starting with smoothbore:

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  • 15th Battery: 128 shot, 64 shell, and 192 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, and 288 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, and 288 case for 12-pdr Napoelons.
  • 24th Battery: 359 shot, 214 shell, and 448 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.

More on the next page:

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  • 15th Battery: 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 24th Battery: 368 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

To the right are columns for Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

  • 13th Battery: 160 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 276 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

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  • 13th Battery: 10 percussion fuse shell, 430 case shot, and 80 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 21st Battery: 583 case shot and 138 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 107 percussion fuse shell, 481 case shot, and 197 canister for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page, we review the Parrott projectiles first:

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  • 16th Battery: 320 shell, 400 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrott rifles.

To the right are Schenkl listings:

  • 13th Battery: 30 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 21st Battery: 127 shell for 3-inch rifles.

No additional cannon projectiles listed on the page which followed. So we move to the small arms:

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  • 13th Battery: 14 Colt navy revolvers and 10 horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: 15 Colt navy revolvers and 5 cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: 14 Colt army revolvers and 12 horse artillery sabers.
  • 17th Battery: 20 Colt army revolvers and 30 horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: 10 Colt navy revolvers, 1 cavalry saber, and 28 horse artillery sabers.
  • 20th Battery: 99 Springfield .58 caliber muskets.
  • 21st Battery: 17 Colt army revolvers and 16 horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: 58 Colt army revolvers and 75 cavalry sabers.
  • 24th Battery: 53 Colt army revolvers.

The next page covers cartridge bags and musket ammunition:

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  • 13th Battery: 139 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 57 cartridge bags for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • 17th Battery: 60 cartridge bags for smoothbore field pieces.
  • 19th Battery: 49 cartridge bags for smoothbore field pieces.
  • 20th Battery: 4,000 cartridges for .58 caliber muskets.
  • 21st Battery: 750 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 4 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly we have the page covering pistol cartridges, fuses, powder, and miscellaneous articles:

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  • 13th Battery: 350 navy pistol cartridges and 850 friction primers.
  • 15th Battery: 400 navy pistol cartridges; 1,577 friction primers; and 100 pistol percussion caps.
  • 16th Battery: 186 army pistol cartridges; 64 paper fuses; 606 friction primers; 19 yards of slow match; 180 pistol percussion caps; and 60 regulation percussion caps.
  • 17th Battery: 1,500 friction primers; 4 yards of slow match; and 11 portfires.
  • 19th Battery: 1,672 friction primers; 88 yards of slow match; and 47 portfires.
  • 21st Battery: 1,000 army pistol cartridges; 886 paper fuses; 3,323 friction primers; 10 yards of slow match; and 1,000 regulation percussion caps.
  • 23rd Battery: 400 army pistol cartridges; 100 pounds of cannon powder; 50 pounds of musket powder; and 50 yards of slow match.
  • 24th Battery: 380 army pistol cartridges; 1,360 friction primers; 2 yards of slow match; and 590 regulation percussion caps.

That concludes the second batch of independent batteries from New York. The last third, a “spotty” dozen, we’ll cover in the next installment.

Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – 3rd New York Artillery

Unlike their sister light artillery regiment, the 1st New York, the 3rd New York Light Artillery seldom receives proper attention from historians.  Starting organization as an infantry regiment, and serving as such for the summer campaigns of 1861, the regiment reorganized as light artillery to support operations in North Carolina. And the batteries played an important role in an underappreciated and under-studied (in my opinion) theater.  As alluded to for the previous quarter, with about half of the enlistments running out in the spring of 1863, the regiment went through a reorganization.  Four batteries mustered out completely, with those retaining time on enlistments transferred to bring others up to strength.  Not until early 1864 were batteries added back to the regiment’s strength.  And by that time the regiment was no longer serving just in North Carolina.

Colonel Charles H. Stewart commanded the regiment at the end of 1863. With his headquarters at New Berne, North Carolina, he also exercised direct command of four batteries stationed there. His second in command, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry M. Stone, also held command of the garrison of Fort Macon, North Carolina. Regimental Majors were Terence J. Kennedy, Edwin S. Jenney, and Theodore H. Schenck, all veteran leaders by this time of the war. Lieutenant Edgar H. Titus served as Regimental Adjutant until replaced by Lieutenant Thomas J. Mersereau on December 24. Lieutenant Paul Fay became regimental Quatermaster on the last day of the year, replacing Lieutenant Samuel B. Tobey, Jr. Regimental Surgeon William W. Knight was supported by Assistant Surgeons Alfred D. Wilson and Bradford S. Manly.

With that background of the regiment in mind, let us turn to the summary:

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  • Battery A: No return.  The original Battery A mustered out in June 1863. Not until September 1864 did a new Battery A muster in its place.
  • Battery B: Reported on Morris Island, South Carolina, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain James E. Ashcroft remained in command of the battery, which was then part of the force facing Fort Sumter at the end of the Second Major Bombardment, assigned to the Tenth Corps. When Ashcroft took leave in December, Lieutenant Edward A. Wildt led the battery.
  • Battery C: Reporting at New Berne, with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain William E. Mercer remained in command of this battery, which had just reorganized and mustered on September 30, 1863. The battery was part of a “battalion” then serving at New Berne, part of the Eighteenth Corps.
  • Battery D: No return.  Another battery that mustered out in June 1863.  A new Battery D mustered in February 1864.
  • Battery E:  At New Berne, North Carolina with four 20-pdr Parrott rifles.  Captain George E. Ashby replaced Theodore H. Schenck (promoted to major) in command of the battery.  The battery was part garrison of New Berne, in the District of North Carolina, Eighteenth Corps.
  • Battery F:  On Folly Island, with four 12-pdr (3.67-inch) Wiard rifles. Captain Samuel C. Day remained in command of the battery, assigned to Vogdes’ Division, Tenth Corps.
  • Battery G: No return. Another battery mustered out in early June. The new Battery G mustered in March 1864.
  • Battery H: Reporting at Newport News, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  In October the battery moved from New Berne to Newport News.  Captain William J. Riggs remained in command of the battery, assigned to Eighteenth Corps.
  • Battery I:  At New Berne and with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain John H. Ammon transferred command of this battery to Captain John D. Clark at the end of the year.
  • Battery K: Also at New Berne but with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain James R. Angel remained in command.
  • Battery L:  As explained in earlier posts, this battery was not assigned to the 3rd New York.  Instead it served as the 24th Independent Battery.  Not until March 1865 was it officially assigned to the regiment.
  • Battery M: At Norfolk, Virginia with six 10-pdr Parrott Rifles.  Captain John H. Howell commanded. The battery transferred to the Norfolk area, listed as serving at Fort Monroe, in October, assigned to Heckman’s Division, Eighteenth Corps.

Those administrative particulars explain the gaps in the summary. And with those in mind, most of the ammunition quantities reported make sense… save one entry:

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  • Battery B: 298 shot, 5 shell, and 462 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery E: 20 shell for 24-pdr field howitzers; 2 shell for 32-pdr field howitzers. Recall Battery E originally had the big field howitzers on their charge, and apparently retained ammunition. This suggests the howitzers were still at New Berne but not assigned to the battery (or regiment).
  • Battery H: 276 shot, 65 shell, and 313 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery I: 318 shot, 126 shell, and 326 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.

On to the next page of ammunition:

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  • Battery B: 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery E: 6 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers; 6 canister for 32-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery H: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery I: 136 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Immediately to the right of the smoothbore columns is an entry for Dyer’s projectiles:

  • Battery C: 36 shell for 3-inch rifles.

Further to the right are columns for Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

  • Battery C: 504 (?) time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E: 84 time fuse shell for 20-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery F: 84 shot and 92 time fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 753 shot and 131 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

More Hotchkiss columns on the next page:

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  • Battery C: 110 percussion fuse shell, 1,167 (!) bullet shells, and 204 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F: 108 percussion fuse shell, 376 bullet shell, and 289 canister for 3.67-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 34 percussion fuse shell and 188 canister for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page are columns for Parrott projectiles:

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  • Battery E: 378 shot, 82 shell, 102 case, and 30 canister for 20-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery M: 648 shell, 15 case, and 134 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Turning to the small arms reported:

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  • Battery B: Sixteen Colt navy revolvers and seventy-five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: One Colt army revolver and sixty-five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery E: Twenty-eight Colt navy revolvers, two cavalry sabers, and forty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F: Thirty-seven Colt army revolvers and twenty-five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Colt navy revolvers and fifty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Six Colt navy revolvers, nine Remington army revolvers and forty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Nineteen Colt navy revolvers, four Remington army revolvers, two cavalry sabers, and fifty-two horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Twenty-three Remington navy revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.

Next are the cartridge bags reported:

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  • Battery C: 375 bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E: 457 bags for 20-pdr Parrotts; 17 bags for 24-pdr or 32-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery F: 1,125 bags for 20-pdr guns (presumably Wiard 3.67-inch).
  • Battery K: 123 bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 185 bags for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Lastly, we look at the pistol cartridges, fuses, and miscellaneous items:

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  • Battery B: 316 navy pistol cartridges and 100 percussion caps.
  • Battery C: 100 army pistol cartridges; 250 paper fuses; 100 pounds of musket powder; 300 friction primers; and 20 yards of slow match.
  • Battery E: 500 navy pistol cartridges; 1,291 paper fuses; 75 pounds of musket powder; 1,472 friction primers; and 12 yards of slow match.
  • Battery F: 1,000 army pistol cartridges; 551 paper fuses; and 857 friction primers.
  • Battery I: 100 navy pistol cartridges.
  • Battery K: 200 army pistol cartridges and 450 navy pistol cartridges.
  • Battery M: 7,111 paper fuses and 1,200 friction primers.

As the calendar turned from 1863 to 1864, the 3rd New York Light Artillery filled back out as a regiment. By summer, ten batteries were in service. Furthermore, the needs of a war reaching its penultimate campaigns brought several of those batteries into the fighting around Petersburg.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Rhode Island’s batteries

As we have discussed for the previous quarters, the small state of Rhode Island mustered a total of four artillery regiments for the Federal cause.  FOUR!

However, three of those regiments were heavy artillery.  And that means only the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery earns significant space in the summaries.  For the third quarter, we find every battery in that regiment (A through H) offered a return.  In addition Battery C, 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery was serving as light artillery.  Thus nine batteries on the summary list:

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Colonel Charles H. Tompkins (not to be confused with the US Regulars cavalry officer), commanded the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery and doubled as the Chief of Artillery, Sixth Corps.  And all eight of his batteries gave reports for the quarter:

  • Battery A: “In the field” with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William A. Arnold remained in command of this battery,  supporting Second Corps.  Their “in the field” location at the end of September was Culpeper County, Virginia.
  • Battery B: Also “In the field,” but with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Battery B also served in Second Corps’ artillery brigade, and thus was also in Culpeper at this time.  Captain  John G. Hazard of this battery was the corps artillery chief.  In his place, Lieutenant William S. Perrin commanded.
  • Battery C: Reporting at Warrenton, Virgnia, with six 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Richard Waterman commanded this battery supporting the Sixth Corps.
  • Battery D: At Loudon, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain William W. Buckley commanded this battery.  Assigned to First Division, Twenty-third Corps through this quarter (but would return to the Ninth Corps, specifically First Division, in October)
  • Battery E: Reporting at Culpeper, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery remained with Third Corps. Captain George E. Randolph, of this battery, was in command of the corps’ artillery brigade.  Lieutenant John K. Bucklyn commanded the battery in his place.
  • Battery F: At Newport News, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons (vice 10-pdr Parrotts reported in the last quarter). Captain James Belger commanded this battery, though he was at the time on extended leave recovering from a wound and on recruiting duty.  In his place Lieutenant Thomas Simpson commanded. The battery spent the summer assigned to the Defenses of New Berne, North Carolina.  And they supported several reconnaissance operations during those months.  In October the battery was ordered to NewPort News.
  • Battery G: Reporting at Warrenton with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain George W. Adams remained in command.  And the battery remained assigned to the Sixth Corps.
  • Battery H: At Fort Scott, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Assigned to the Twenty-second Corps from the Defenses of Washington.  Captain Jeffrey Hazard resigned in August.  Lieutenant Charles F. Mason stood in as commander in his absence.  Lieutenant Crawford Allen, Jr. would transfer from Battery G in December, and receive the captaincy.

Rhode Island would not form any other batteries within the 1st Artillery Regiment.

The last line in this section is for a battery in the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery.  This regiment, as readers will recall, served in the Department of the South at this time, providing garrison troops for Fort Pulaski, Hilton Head, Beaufort, and Folly Island.  But more importantly, the regiment provided troops for the siege of Battery Wagner.  One battery of this regiment was designated a light battery and appears on the summary:

  • Battery C: Reporting on Morris Island, South Carolina with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Charles R. Brayton remained in command.

We’ll cover the remainder of this regiment in a latter post focused on heavy artillery.

Guns need ammunition.  And the Rhode Island batteries reported plenty.  We start with the smoothbore:

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  • Battery B, 1st RI: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery E, 1st RI: 288 shot, 96 shell, 284 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery F, 1st RI: 400 shot, 160 shell, 360 case, and 144 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: 120 shell, 214 case, and 92 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

For the rifled guns, we start with the Hotchkiss rounds:

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  • Battery A, 1st RI: 175 canister, 57 percussion shell, 533 fuse shell, and 509 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: 199 canister, 124 percussion shell, 149 fuse shell, and 334 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: 120 canister and 231 percussion shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 3rd RI: 180 canister, 84 percussion shell, 468 fuse shell, and 539 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

I’ll break down the next page into sections for clarity.  Starting with an entry for Dyer’s patent projectiles:

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  • Battery G, 1st RI: 34 shell for 3-inch rifles.

And the Parrott columns:

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  • Battery C, 1st RI: 491 shell, 367 case, and 122 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

And there were plenty of Schenkl projectiles reported:

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  • Battery A, 1st RI: 64 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: 146 shell and 33 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: 260 shell and 589 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: 104 shell and 173 case for 3-inch rifles.

The last set of columns we review are the small arms:

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  • Battery A, 1st RI: Four army revolvers, nineteen navy revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B, 1st RI: Twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C, 1st RI: Seven navy revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D, 1st RI: Eight army revolvers, twelve navy revolvers, forty-five cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery E, 1st RI: Twelve navy revolvers and one horse artillery saber.
  • Battery F, 1st RI: 102 army revolvers and twenty horse cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: Eight navy revolvers, ten cavalry sabers, and seventeen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: Twenty army revolvers and thirty-six horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: Forty-eight army revolvers, fifty-three cavalry sabers, and seventy-nine horse artillery sabers.

The Rhode Island batteries leave us with few questions.  The only question I pose what ammunition Battery D had on hand for its Napoleons?  Perhaps this nearly complete accounting from the Rhode Island batteries reflects the number of its officers then serving as artillery chiefs.