Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – Independent Illinois Batteries

We turn now to “below the line,” or at least on the next page, for the listings for independent batteries from Illinois. Nine batteries listed:

0319_1_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Battery A, 3rd Illinois Artillery: At Little Rock, Arkansas with six 3.80-inch James Rifles. As mentioned in earlier summaries, this battery was better known as the Springfield Light Artillery, or Vaughn’s Battery. Commanded by Captain Thomas F. Vaughn, the battery was part of the Arkansas Expedition. By the late fall, with reorganizations, the battery fell under the Second Division, Army of Arkansas. With Vaughn absent, Lieutenant Edward B. Stillings was in temporary command at the end of December.
  • Chicago Board of Trade Battery: At Huntsville, Alabama, with four 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain James H. Stokes was still the battery commander. But as he was detailed to command a division of the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Cumberland, Lieutenant George I. Robinson led the battery. The battery was assigned to Second Division, Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland. They spent most of the fall supporting operations against Confederate raiders, before settling into winter quarters at Huntsville.
  • Chicago Mercantile Battery: At Pass Cavallo, Texas, with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Patrick H. White remained in command. Assigned to the Third Division, Thirteenth Corps, the battery was part of a force sent to the Texas coast at the end of the year.
  • Colvin’s Battery: At Knoxville, Tennessee, with two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles and two 10-pdr Parrotts. This battery was formed in the late summer with men from the 107th Illinois and 33rd Kentucky Infantry (along with some from the 22nd Indiana Battery). By October it was officially carried on the rolls as a battery. Captain John H. Colvin remained in command. The battery participated in the Knoxville Campaign as part of Fourth Division, Twenty-Third Corps. At the end of the year, the battery transferred to the Cavalry, Army of the Ohio.
  • Bridge’s Battery: At Chattanooga, Tennessee, with two 12-pdr Napoleons and six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Lyman Bridges commanded. With reorganizations after Chickamuaga, the battery was assigned to Third Division, Fourth Corps. The battery participated in the operations around Chattanooga that fall. They were among the batteries thrown forward to Orchard Knob. After victory at Chattanooga, the battery participated in the relief of Knoxville.
  • Elgin or 5th Battery(?): Also known as Renwick’s Battery, after its first commander. Reporting at Mossy (as written, Mofry?) Creek, Tennessee, with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 24-pdr field howitzers. Captain Andrew M. Wood remained in command. And the battery with Second Division, Twenty Third Corps. The battery saw action at the battle of Mossy Creek, on December 29.
  • Henshaw’s Battery: At Loudon, Tennessee, but with no artillery reported. In the previous quarter the battery reported four 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Edward C. Henshaw remained in command. The battery remained with Second Division, Twenty-Third Corps. After the relief of Nashville, the division moved to Loudon. However, they would from there move to Strawberry Plains, east of Knoxville, before wintering at Mossy Creek.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee, with four 3.80-inch James rifles. William Cogswell remained the battery captain. As part of Second Division, Seventeenth Corps, the battery was among the force sent to Chattanooga. The battery covered Sherman’s crossing and subsequent actions as the siege of that place was lifted. Then afterward participated in the relief of Knoxville. The battery went into winter quarters in north Alabama. In December the battery was assigned to Third Division, Fifteenth Corps. The Nashville location alludes to the reporting date of August 1864, after the battery was transferred to garrison duties.
  • Lovejoy’s battery: Reporting at Brownsville, Arkansas with two 12-pdr mountain howitzer. This listing does not match with any of the “according to Dyer’s” Indiana batteries. We discussed Lovejoy’s Battery last quarter, but under the Missouri heading. It was a section from the 2nd Missouri Cavalry, Merrill’s Horse, then serving at Brownsville. I’m rather sure this is Lieutenant George F. Lovejoy’s section. But I cannot explain why the Ordnance Department would change the state attribution here.

Let us table Lovejoy’s for the time being and move on to the ammunition. Starting with the smoothbore:

0321_1_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Board of Trade Battery: 139 shot and 224 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 32 shell for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Elgin Battery: 34 shot, 36 shell, and 117 case for 12-pdr Napoleons; 135 shell for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery: 28 shell and 96 case for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

We’ll break the next page down into sections, starting with the rest of the smoothbore:

0321_2_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Board of Trade Battery: 197 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 17 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Elgin Battery: 25 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 116 case and 48 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery: 11 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

To the right are listings for Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

  • Mercantile Battery: 512 shot and 281 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 262 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

0322_1_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Springfield Light Artillery: 334 percussion fuse shell and 268 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 23 percussion fuse shell and 30 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Mercantile Battery: 240 percussion fuse shell and 138 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Colvin’s Battery: 23 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 240 percussion fuse shell, 240 case shot, and 160 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 170 percussion fuse shell and 149 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

To the right are columns for James patent projectiles:

  • Springfield Light Artillery: 236 shot, 212 shell, and 30 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 40 shot and 41 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 31 shot, 247 shell, and 109 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Then the Parrott and Schenkl sections:

0322_2_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Colvin’s Battery: 56 shell and 19 case Parrott patent for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 104 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Nothing reported on the next page:

0323_1_Snip_ILL_Ind

So on to the small arms:

0323_2_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Springfield Light Artillery: ten horse artillery sabers.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 104 Colt army revolvers, three cavalry sabers, and eighteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Mercantile Battery: One Colt army revolver and four horse artillery sabers.
  • Bridge’s Battery: Ten Remington army revolvers, fifteen cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Elgin Battery: Six Remington navy revolvers and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Henshaw’s Battery: Sixteen Colt army revolvers, seven cavalry sabers, and nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: Two Colt navy revolvers and two cavalry sabers.

Cartridge bags reported on hand:

0324_2_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Springfield Light Artillery: 720 bags for James rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 312 bags for James rifles.
  • Mercantile Battery: 40 bags for 3-inch rifles and 165 bags for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 198 bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 752 bags for James rifles.

Lastly, small arms cartridges, fuses, friction primers, and other items to cause a boom:

0325_1_Snip_ILL_Ind
  • Springfield Light Artillery: 939 friction primers.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 2128 friction primers and 250 percussion caps.
  • Mercantile Battery: 550 paper fuses, 123 friction primers, and two yards of slow match.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 800 pistol cartridges, 600 paper fuses, 595 friction primers, six yards of slow match, 150 percussion pistol caps, 560 percussion caps, and 27 portfires.
  • Elgin Battery: 800 friction primers.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 740 friction primers and 12 portfires.

Between December 1863 and the end of the war, many of these Illinois independent batteries ceased to be independent. As the batteries from the 1st and 2nd Illinois Artillery saw their members mustering out, and as some of those lettered batteries consolidated, the independent batteries were redesignated. Because of that, the Illinois records appear disconnected at points in 1864 and 1865. Sad, because many of these are batteries with enviable service records.

Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – 1st Illinois Artillery

I contend the 1st Illinois Artillery Regiment punched well above its weight during the war. Not just in terms of where they served or battles fought. Though, from a western theater perspective, batteries from this regiment always seemed in the tick of the fight. But the regiment’s impact was beyond just the metal it threw around in battle. This regiment produced several officers who went on to serve in important positions outside the regiment. In last quarter’s post, I mentioned Colonel Joseph D. Webster, the regiment’s first commander, who served as a chief of staff for both Grant and Sherman. Colonel Ezra Taylor, who replaced Webster in May 1863, was dual-hatted as Sherman’s chief of artillery from Shiloh through Vicksburg (in the latter, formally the Chief of Artillery, Fifteenth Corps). Major Charles Houghtaling, who would later become the regimental Colonel, served a similar role for the Fourteenth Corps, in the Army of the Cumberland. Lieutenant-Colonel Charles H. Adams left the regiment for the top spot in the 2nd Tennessee Heavy Artillery, forming at Memphis. Major Allen C. Waterhouse lead the artillery brigade of the Seventeenth Corps, at times filling in as Artillery Chief. And those are just a few notables. As we look down to the battery officers, many very capable officers with fine records stand out. Let’s look at a few of those as we walk through this summary:

0309_1_Snip_ILL1
  • Battery A: Larkinsville, Alabama, with five 12-pdr Napoleons and one 10-pdr Parrott.  The battery remained with Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, with Captain Peter P. Wood in command.  The battery was part of Sherman’s force sent to relieve Chattanooga, and later sent to relieve Knoxville. They would winter in north Alabama.
  • Battery B: Also at Larkinsville, Alabama, with four 6-pdr field guns and one 12-pdr field howitzer. Like Battery A, this battery was also assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps.  Likewise, the battery supported the reliefs of Chattanooga and Knoxville. Captain Israel P. Rumsey remained in command.
  • Battery C:  Reporting at Chattanooga, Tennessee, now with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles, being refitted after the campaigns around that city. Captain Mark H. Prescott remained in command, but the battery transferred to the First Division, Fourteenth Corps as the Army of the Cumberland reorganized in October.
  • Battery D: At Vicksburg, Mississippi, now reverting back to reporting four 24-pdr field howitzers, vice four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles reported the previous quarter… which implies a transcription error. Regardless, battery remained with Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, and part of the occupation force at Vicksburg. The battery participated in a couple of expeditions out of Vicksburg in the fall. Then moved, with the division, to duty on the Big Black River, east of Vicksburg. Lieutenant George P. Cunningham was promoted to captain of the battery in December 1864.
  • Battery E: At Corinth, Mississippi, with five 12-pdr Napoleons and one 3.80-inch James Rifle.  Lieutenant John A. Fitch remained in command, and the battery remained under Third Division, Fifteenth Corps. The battery participated in a couple of expeditions across Mississippi during the fall. The division reached Corinth as part of the movement to Chattanooga, but was not forwarded. In November, the division, along with the battery, moved to Memphis (part of the rundown of the Corinth garrison at that time).
  • Battery F: No report. Captain John T. Cheney remained in command of this battery.  As part of Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps, the battery was part of the reinforcement sent to Chattanooga. Like the other Fifteenth Corps batteries, Battery F played a supporting role at Chattanooga and later at Knoxville.
  • Battery G:  Serving as siege artillery at Corinth, Mississippi, with four 24-pdr siege guns. The battery was assigned to Second Division, Sixteenth Corps.  Captain Raphael G. Rombauer remained in command. When the Corinth garrison was disbanded, Battery G moved to Fort Pickering, in Memphis, in January.
  • Battery H: At Bellefonte, Alabama with three 20-pdr Parrotts.  Assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps, Lieutenant Francis DeGress remained in command of this battery (he would receive promotion to captain in December, after Captain Levi W. Hart was discharged).  As with the other Fifteenth Corps Illinois batteries, DeGress’ were setup to support Sherman’s crossing of the Tennessee in the ill-fated assault on Tunnel Hill. After the march to Knoxville, the battery returned to north Alabama with the division.
  • Battery I: At Scottsboro, Alabama with four 3.80-inch James Rifles. The battery came to Chattanooga as part of Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps. However, Captain Albert Cudney, who had taken over the battery in June, was not present. Lieutenant Josiah H. Burton, of Battery F, led the battery in support, alongside Battery H (above).  After the relief of Knoxville, the battery followed the division into winter quarters in northern Alabama.
  • Battery K: No return. This battery was stationed at Memphis, Tennessee as part of Grierson’s Cavalry Division, Sixteenth Corps. Recall this battery was, at least up through the spring, equipped with Woodruff guns. Without a return, the equipment at the end of 1863 cannot be confirmed. Captain Jason B. Smith remained in command. 
  • Battery L: In Washington, D.C., with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain John Rourke commanded this battery, assigned supporting Mulligan’s Brigade, Scammon’s Division, then in West Virginia. So the location given for the return is in question. 
  • Battery M:  Reporting at Loudon, Tennessee with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles (losing its Napoleons and converting to a uniform battery of rifles). Captain George W. Spencer, promoted in September, commanded this battery. With the reorganization of the Army of the Cumberland, the battery transferred to Second Division Fourth Corps.

Those particulars out of the way, we can look to the ammunition reported for this varied lot of cannon. Starting with the smoothbore:

0311_1_Snip_ILL1
  • Battery A: 207 shot, 80 shell, and 270 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery D: 177 shell for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery E: 163 shot, 159 shell, and 246 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 314 shot and 120 shell for 24-pdr siege guns.
  • Battery L: 70 shot and 504 shell for 6-pdr field guns; 385 shot (unprepared) for 12-pdr “heavy” guns; 134 shot and 639 case for 12-pdr Napoleons; and 189 shell and 48 case for 12-pdr field howitzers (a wide array of ammunition types perhaps reflecting garrison duty in West Virginia).

We’ll split this next page into groupings for the rest of the smoothbore and then the first columns of rifle ammunition:

0311_2_Snip_ILL1

Smoothbore:

  • Battery A: 69 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery D: 140 case and 33 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery E: 158 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 72 case, 89 canister, and 113 stands of grape for 24-pdr siege guns.
  • Battery L: 255 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers; 923 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

And the other half of this section covers rifled projectiles:

  • Battery C: 448 Hotchkiss time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E: 93 Hotchkiss time fuse shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery L: 580 Dyer’s case for 3-inch rifles; 1005 Hotchkiss time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; 186 Hotchkiss shot and 144 Hotchkiss time fuse shell for 3.80-inch James rifles. (Apparently Battery L was managing an ammunition dump.)
  • Battery M: 343 Hotchkiss time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

Hotchkiss and James Projectiles on the next page:

0312_1_Snip_ILL1

The remaining Hotchkiss first:

  • Battery C: 238 percussion fuse shell, 11 bullet shell, and 252 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E: 17 percussion fuse shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery H: 49 canister for 20-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery L: 232 bullet shell and 268 canister for 3.80-inch rifles; and 115 percussion fuse shell and 504 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 232 percussion fuse shell, 409 bullet shell, and 29 canister for 3-inch rifles.

And the James columns:

  • Battery E: 50 canister for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery I: 64 shot, 214 shell, and 256 canister for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery L: 387 shot, 106 shell, and 19 canister for 3.80-inch James rifles.

Parrott and Schenkl on the next page:

0312_2_Snip_ILL1

First the Parrotts:

  • Battery A: 121 shell, 24 case, and 16 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery H: 163 shell, 77 case, and 17 canister for 20-pdr Parrott.

Then Schenkl:

  • Battery L: 300 shell for 3-inch rifles; and 282 shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.

On to the small arms:

0313_2_Snip_ILL1
  • Battery A: Three Colt army revolvers, thirty Colt navy revolvers, and four horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Six Colt navy revolvers and two cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: Seven Colt army revolvers, ten Colt navy revolvers, and ten cavalry sabers.
  • Battery D: Five cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: Two cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G: Sixty .58 caliber Springfield muskets and thirteen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery I: Eleven Colt navy revolvers and three cavalry sabers.
  • Battery L: Seventeen Sharps carbines, twenty-eight Colt army revolvers, and 148 cavalry sabers.
  • Battery M: One Colt army revolver and one cavalry saber.

Lots of cartridge bags, cartridges, and fuses over the last two pages:

0314_2_Snip_ILL1
  • Battery C: 33 cartridge bags for case shot (field guns or howitzers).
  • Battery E: 161 cartridge bags for James rifles.
  • Battery G: 120 cartridge bags for 24-pdr siege guns and 2,400 musket cartridges.
  • Battery I: 515 cartridge bags for James rifles.
  • Battery L: 2,283 cartridge bags for James rifles and 765 cartridge bags for case (for 12-pdr Napoleons)
  • Battery M: 872 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
0315_1_Snip_ILL1
  • Battery A: 550 army caliber and 900 navy caliber pistol cartridges.
  • Battery B: 120 navy caliber pistol cartridges and 1,336 friction primers.
  • Battery C: 344 paper fuses and 275 friction primers.
  • Battery D: 500 friction primers.
  • Battery E: 1,750 friction primers and four portfires.
  • Battery G: 2,620 pounds of cannon powder and 569 friction primers.
  • Battery H: 1,410 paper fuses, 1,850 friction primers, 19 yards of slow match, and 48 portfires.
  • Battery I: 240 navy caliber pistol cartridges and 556 friction primers.
  • Battery L: 3,000 army pistol cartridges, 609 paper fuses, 4,540 friction primers, and 3,600 percussion caps (pistol).
  • Battery M: 1.096 paper fuses, 628 friction primers, 250 percussion caps (musket?), and 10 portfires.

That covers the 1st Illinois Artillery. We’ll pick up the 2nd Illinois in the next installment.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Rhode Island’s batteries

As we have discussed for the previous quarters, the small state of Rhode Island mustered a total of four artillery regiments for the Federal cause.  FOUR!

However, three of those regiments were heavy artillery.  And that means only the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery earns significant space in the summaries.  For the third quarter, we find every battery in that regiment (A through H) offered a return.  In addition Battery C, 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery was serving as light artillery.  Thus nine batteries on the summary list:

0289_1_Snip_RI

Colonel Charles H. Tompkins (not to be confused with the US Regulars cavalry officer), commanded the 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery and doubled as the Chief of Artillery, Sixth Corps.  And all eight of his batteries gave reports for the quarter:

  • Battery A: “In the field” with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William A. Arnold remained in command of this battery,  supporting Second Corps.  Their “in the field” location at the end of September was Culpeper County, Virginia.
  • Battery B: Also “In the field,” but with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Battery B also served in Second Corps’ artillery brigade, and thus was also in Culpeper at this time.  Captain  John G. Hazard of this battery was the corps artillery chief.  In his place, Lieutenant William S. Perrin commanded.
  • Battery C: Reporting at Warrenton, Virgnia, with six 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Richard Waterman commanded this battery supporting the Sixth Corps.
  • Battery D: At Loudon, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain William W. Buckley commanded this battery.  Assigned to First Division, Twenty-third Corps through this quarter (but would return to the Ninth Corps, specifically First Division, in October)
  • Battery E: Reporting at Culpeper, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery remained with Third Corps. Captain George E. Randolph, of this battery, was in command of the corps’ artillery brigade.  Lieutenant John K. Bucklyn commanded the battery in his place.
  • Battery F: At Newport News, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons (vice 10-pdr Parrotts reported in the last quarter). Captain James Belger commanded this battery, though he was at the time on extended leave recovering from a wound and on recruiting duty.  In his place Lieutenant Thomas Simpson commanded. The battery spent the summer assigned to the Defenses of New Berne, North Carolina.  And they supported several reconnaissance operations during those months.  In October the battery was ordered to NewPort News.
  • Battery G: Reporting at Warrenton with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain George W. Adams remained in command.  And the battery remained assigned to the Sixth Corps.
  • Battery H: At Fort Scott, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Assigned to the Twenty-second Corps from the Defenses of Washington.  Captain Jeffrey Hazard resigned in August.  Lieutenant Charles F. Mason stood in as commander in his absence.  Lieutenant Crawford Allen, Jr. would transfer from Battery G in December, and receive the captaincy.

Rhode Island would not form any other batteries within the 1st Artillery Regiment.

The last line in this section is for a battery in the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery.  This regiment, as readers will recall, served in the Department of the South at this time, providing garrison troops for Fort Pulaski, Hilton Head, Beaufort, and Folly Island.  But more importantly, the regiment provided troops for the siege of Battery Wagner.  One battery of this regiment was designated a light battery and appears on the summary:

  • Battery C: Reporting on Morris Island, South Carolina with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Charles R. Brayton remained in command.

We’ll cover the remainder of this regiment in a latter post focused on heavy artillery.

Guns need ammunition.  And the Rhode Island batteries reported plenty.  We start with the smoothbore:

0291_1_Snip_RI

  • Battery B, 1st RI: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery E, 1st RI: 288 shot, 96 shell, 284 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery F, 1st RI: 400 shot, 160 shell, 360 case, and 144 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: 120 shell, 214 case, and 92 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

For the rifled guns, we start with the Hotchkiss rounds:

0291_2_Snip_RI

  • Battery A, 1st RI: 175 canister, 57 percussion shell, 533 fuse shell, and 509 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: 199 canister, 124 percussion shell, 149 fuse shell, and 334 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: 120 canister and 231 percussion shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 3rd RI: 180 canister, 84 percussion shell, 468 fuse shell, and 539 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

I’ll break down the next page into sections for clarity.  Starting with an entry for Dyer’s patent projectiles:

0292_1D_Snip_RI

  • Battery G, 1st RI: 34 shell for 3-inch rifles.

And the Parrott columns:

0292_1P_Snip_RI

  • Battery C, 1st RI: 491 shell, 367 case, and 122 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

And there were plenty of Schenkl projectiles reported:

0292_2_Snip_RI

  • Battery A, 1st RI: 64 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: 146 shell and 33 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: 260 shell and 589 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: 104 shell and 173 case for 3-inch rifles.

The last set of columns we review are the small arms:

0292_3_Snip_RI

  • Battery A, 1st RI: Four army revolvers, nineteen navy revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B, 1st RI: Twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C, 1st RI: Seven navy revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D, 1st RI: Eight army revolvers, twelve navy revolvers, forty-five cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery E, 1st RI: Twelve navy revolvers and one horse artillery saber.
  • Battery F, 1st RI: 102 army revolvers and twenty horse cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G, 1st RI: Eight navy revolvers, ten cavalry sabers, and seventeen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H, 1st RI: Twenty army revolvers and thirty-six horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C, 3rd RI: Forty-eight army revolvers, fifty-three cavalry sabers, and seventy-nine horse artillery sabers.

The Rhode Island batteries leave us with few questions.  The only question I pose what ammunition Battery D had on hand for its Napoleons?  Perhaps this nearly complete accounting from the Rhode Island batteries reflects the number of its officers then serving as artillery chiefs.