Signal stations, patrols, pickets, and videttes in the winter of 1864

In yesterday’s post on the signal stations in Culpeper County during the winter of 1864, we saw the dual role of those stations in the southern half of the county.  The stations provided communication links and performed as observation posts, on high points, overlooking the Confederate lines.  The observations from those stations provided valuable intelligenceContinue reading “Signal stations, patrols, pickets, and videttes in the winter of 1864”

Intelligence forwarded by wig-wag: Signal Stations as Observation Posts

Consider this exchange of messages filed by Captain Lemuel Norton’s signal stations on February 24, 1864: Pony Mountain, February 24, 1864–10.40 a.m. Captain Norton: A brigade of infantry moving down in direction of Morton’s Ford. Bartley. —– Headquarters Army of the Potomac, February 24, 1864. Lieutenant Bartley: Watch that brigade closely. How far from Morton’sContinue reading “Intelligence forwarded by wig-wag: Signal Stations as Observation Posts”

A fine network of wig-wags: Signal stations for the Army of the Potomac, Winter 1864

When the Army of the Potomac went into winter quarters in December 1863, it carried into the season a basic communication network which used semaphore flags, established at the close of the Mine Run Campaign.  Although the area occupied by the army remained at most a few hours ride in width and breadth, the needContinue reading “A fine network of wig-wags: Signal stations for the Army of the Potomac, Winter 1864”