Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 3

The last dozen in dependent batteries from New York, the 25th through 36th Batteries, feature several story lines which had not played out by the end of 1863. Thus the listing is incomplete and lacking in some respects. And, we see just nine lines:

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But we’ll discuss all twelve here in order to fill in the gaps:

  • 25th Battery: No return.  Recall, while in transit to New Orleans in January, this battery’s transport wrecked.  This “hard luck” battery remained at New Orleans, assigned to the Fourth Division, Nineteenth Corps through October as part of the city defenses.  Captain John A. Grow remained in command.  Earlier in the year, the battery reported four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. A detachment from the battery saw action at Vermilionville, Louisiana as part of an expedition to the Teche Campaign in November.
  • 26th Battery: Reprting at Thibodaux, Louisiana, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Also suffering loss in the January shipwreck, the 26th was, at the reporting time, part of the District of LaFourche. Captain George W. Fox remained in command of the battery.
  • 27th Battery: At Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  As part of the Department of the Susquehanna the battery was the artillery complement to the garrison of Philadelphia. Captain John B. Eaton commanded this battery.
  • 28th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with no artillery listed.  The battery served at Fort Schuyler and Sandy Hook.  Captain Josiah C. Hannum retained command. Though in his absence, Lieutenant Ira W. Steward led the battery at the end of the year.
  • 29th Battery: No return. After July 1863, remaining enlistments with this battery transferred to the 32nd Battery (below).  Lieutenant Bernard Wever was the ranking officer left with the battery.
  • 30th Battery: At Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Alfred Von Kleiser remained in command.   The battery was assigned to Second Brigade, First Division, Department of West Virginia.
  • 31st Battery: No return.  Captain Gustav Von Blucher was in command.  The battery appears in the Department of West Virginia. But as it was reduced, with many of the men attached to the 30th Battery, the battery was in effect only a paper designation. Von Blucher himself was serving as a staff officer with the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac.
  • 32nd Battery: At Sandy Hook, Maryland with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Kusserow remained in command.  The battery served alongside the 30th in Second Brigade, First Division, Department of West Virginia.
  • 33rd Battery:  At Camp Barry, District of Columbia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  This freshly recruited battery served at the Artillery Camp of Instruction, in the Department of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).   Captain Algar M. Wheeler commanded. 
  • 34th Battery: Not listed. This number was reserved for Battery L, 2nd New York Artillery. Captain Jacob Roemer’s battery, then serving in 1st Division, Ninth Corps, officially took it’s “Independent” number in November. The battery operated near Knoxville in December 1863. For unknown reasons, the clerks failed to account for this battery under either the new or old designation. The battery maintained four 3-inch rifles.
  • 35th Battery: Not listed. Authorized on July 9.  Captain James B. Caryle was given the commission to recruit the battery.  But it never completed organization.  The authority was recalled. The recruited men were assigned to Battery A, 16th New York Heavy Artillery.
  • 36th Battery:  Not listed.  On August 11, 1863, Captain Charles Graham Bacon was authorized to recruit this battery. On October 14, authority was revoked and the men recruited by that time were transferred to the 13th New York Heavy Artillery. We will see this battery accounted for with in the miscellaneous listings to follow.

For those batteries filing returns, we look to the ammunition on hand. Starting with smoothbore:

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  • 26th Battery: 148 shot, 12 shell, and 48 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 27th Battery: 192 shot, 64 shell, and 192 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 30th Battery: 308 shot, 128 shell, and 320 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Continuing on to the next page:

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  • 26th Battery: 12 canister for 12-pdr Napoleon.
  • 27th Battery: 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleon.
  • 30th Battery: 112 canister for 12-pdr Napoleon.

Only one of the rifled gun batteries reported Hotchkiss rounds on hand:

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  • 32nd Battery: 114 Hotchkiss case shot and 120 Hotchkiss canister for 3-inch rifles.

So the 33rd, being a new battery, presumably training hard at the artillery school, was not entrusted with ammunition… yet. The 32nd’s accounting continues on the next page with Schenkl projectiles:

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  • 32nd Battery: 583 Schenkl shell for 3-inch rifles.

And another entry on the next page:

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  • 32nd Battery: 383 Schenkl case shot.

All six reporting batteries indicated small arms on hand:

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  • 26th Battery: 17 Colt army revolvers, 12 cavalry sabers, and 11 horse artillery sabers.
  • 27th Battery: 17 Colt army revolvers, 30 cavalry sabers, and 10 horse artillery sabers.
  • 28th Battery: 145 Springfield muskets, .58-caliber.
  • 30th Battery: 13 Colt army revolvers and 64 cavalry sabers.
  • 32nd Battery: 9 Colt navy revolvers, 36 cavalry sabers, and 11 foot artillery swords.
  • 33rd Battery: 20 Colt navy revolvers and 30 horse artillery sabers.

Yes, some of those foot artillery swords were issued… allegedly.

Turning to the cartridge bags reported:

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  • 26th Battery: 100 cartridge bags for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 27th Battery: 10 cartridge bags for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 32nd Battery: 1,237 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 33rd Battery: 50 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.

So we see that while in training the 33rd Battery was allowed to “make noise” but not “send things downrange!”

Finally to the last page for pistol cartridges, fuses, and miscellaneous articles:

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  • 26th Battery: 700 army pistol cartridges and 800 friction primers.
  • 27th Battery: 25 army pistol cartridges; 700 friction primers; and 500 regulation percussion caps.
  • 30th Battery: 48 army pistol cartridges; 500 friction primers; 38 yards of slow match; 60 pistol percussion caps; and 116 portfires.
  • 32nd Battery: 200 navy pistol cartridges; 1,086 paper fuses; and 2,009 friction primers.
  • 33rd Battery: 100 friction primers and 50 yards of slow match.

This concludes the independent batteries from New York, including some gaps. But we are not finished with the state. Below the independent batteries were three lines covering miscellaneous entries outside the normal unit organization. We’ll review those next.

Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 2

Let us review the fourth quarter statements for the middle dozen New York independent “light” batteries:

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I say “light” as while on paper these were indeed light batteries, in actuality not all served as light batteries. We see nine returns processed. All within January or February 1864. Very tidy… relatively speaking:

  • 13th Independent Battery: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William Wheeler remained in command, and the battery supported the Eleventh Corps. The battery participated in the fighting around Chattanooga in November. Using borrowed horses, the battery deployed to support Sherman’s crossing on November 22. Afterwards, the battery was part of the relief column sent to Knoxville. All told, for November, Wheeler reported expenditure of “horses, 24; ammunition, 50 Schenkl percussion, 50 Hotchkiss case, 10 Hotchkiss percussion – 110 rounds” during the month of November.
  • 14th Independent Battery: No return. The battery formally disbanded in September 1863. 
  • 15th Battery:  At Brandy Station, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Patrick Hart commanded this battery, assigned to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Reserve Artillery, Army of the Potomac.
  • 16th Battery: At Newport News, Virginia with four 10-pdr Parrott Rifles. Captain Frederick L. Hiller’s battery was assigned to the Department of Virginia and North Carolina.
  • 17th Battery: In Centreville, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain George T. Anthony’s battery was at that time assigned to Tyler’s Division, the Defenses of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).
  • 18th Battery: No return. Captain Albert G. Mack’s battery remained with Nineteenth Corps, and posted to the defenses of New Orleans. Around the first of the year, the battery transferred to Baton Rouge. Likely the battery retained four 20-pdr Parrotts. 
  • 19th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, Twenty-second Corps.  Captain Edward W. Rogers remained in command.
  • 20th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, with no cannon (instead, they reported muskets on hand).  Captain Benjamin Franklin Ryer’s battery served as garrison artillery in the defenses of New York.  At the end of December, returns indicated Lieutenant Arthur Weicker led the battery in Ryer’s absence.
  • 21st Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with four 3-inch steel guns (make and model unspecified). After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery remained at that post, as part of the Reserve Artillery of the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain James Barnes remained in command.
  • 22nd Battery: No return. Earlier in February 1863 the battery became Company M, 9th New York Heavy Artillery.  The designation remained on the clerk’s report as a placeholder.
  • 23rd Battery: Washington, North Carolina with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. With Captain Alfred Ransom on leave, Lieutenant Thomas Low led the battery at the close of the year. The 23rd was assigned to the Sub-District of Pamlico, District of North Carolina, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.
  • 24th Battery: At Plymouth, North Carolina with six 12-pdr Napoleons. This battery was assigned to the Sub-District of Albemarle, District of North Carolina, Department of Virginia and North Carolina.  Captain A. Lester Cady remained in command.

Those particulars providing the context, we move to the ammunition pages, starting with smoothbore:

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  • 15th Battery: 128 shot, 64 shell, and 192 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, and 288 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, and 288 case for 12-pdr Napoelons.
  • 24th Battery: 359 shot, 214 shell, and 448 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.

More on the next page:

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  • 15th Battery: 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 24th Battery: 368 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

To the right are columns for Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

  • 13th Battery: 160 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 276 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

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  • 13th Battery: 10 percussion fuse shell, 430 case shot, and 80 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 21st Battery: 583 case shot and 138 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 107 percussion fuse shell, 481 case shot, and 197 canister for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page, we review the Parrott projectiles first:

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  • 16th Battery: 320 shell, 400 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrott rifles.

To the right are Schenkl listings:

  • 13th Battery: 30 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 21st Battery: 127 shell for 3-inch rifles.

No additional cannon projectiles listed on the page which followed. So we move to the small arms:

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  • 13th Battery: 14 Colt navy revolvers and 10 horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: 15 Colt navy revolvers and 5 cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: 14 Colt army revolvers and 12 horse artillery sabers.
  • 17th Battery: 20 Colt army revolvers and 30 horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: 10 Colt navy revolvers, 1 cavalry saber, and 28 horse artillery sabers.
  • 20th Battery: 99 Springfield .58 caliber muskets.
  • 21st Battery: 17 Colt army revolvers and 16 horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: 58 Colt army revolvers and 75 cavalry sabers.
  • 24th Battery: 53 Colt army revolvers.

The next page covers cartridge bags and musket ammunition:

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  • 13th Battery: 139 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 57 cartridge bags for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • 17th Battery: 60 cartridge bags for smoothbore field pieces.
  • 19th Battery: 49 cartridge bags for smoothbore field pieces.
  • 20th Battery: 4,000 cartridges for .58 caliber muskets.
  • 21st Battery: 750 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 4 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly we have the page covering pistol cartridges, fuses, powder, and miscellaneous articles:

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  • 13th Battery: 350 navy pistol cartridges and 850 friction primers.
  • 15th Battery: 400 navy pistol cartridges; 1,577 friction primers; and 100 pistol percussion caps.
  • 16th Battery: 186 army pistol cartridges; 64 paper fuses; 606 friction primers; 19 yards of slow match; 180 pistol percussion caps; and 60 regulation percussion caps.
  • 17th Battery: 1,500 friction primers; 4 yards of slow match; and 11 portfires.
  • 19th Battery: 1,672 friction primers; 88 yards of slow match; and 47 portfires.
  • 21st Battery: 1,000 army pistol cartridges; 886 paper fuses; 3,323 friction primers; 10 yards of slow match; and 1,000 regulation percussion caps.
  • 23rd Battery: 400 army pistol cartridges; 100 pounds of cannon powder; 50 pounds of musket powder; and 50 yards of slow match.
  • 24th Battery: 380 army pistol cartridges; 1,360 friction primers; 2 yards of slow match; and 590 regulation percussion caps.

That concludes the second batch of independent batteries from New York. The last third, a “spotty” dozen, we’ll cover in the next installment.

Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – 1st Michigan Light Artillery

Michigan “regimented” its batteries in the fall of 1862, and from that time the batteries were officially “lettered” within that regimental system. However, old habits died hard. The clerks at the Ordnance Department continued to reference those units by their numbered designations through the end of 1863. And in their defense, the state’s Adjutant General, in his end of year report, gave the numbered designation in parenthesis after the lettered regimental battery designation (A convention I use here to avoid any ambiguity). We see those twelve batteries with a couple of non-regimental lines in the fourth quarter summaries for 1863:

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Focusing on the 1st Michigan Light Artillery for this post, Colonel Cyrus O. Loomis, originally the captain of Battery A, commanded. Loomis also served as the chief of artillery for First Division (Rousseau), Fourteenth Corps. When Major-General Lovell Rousseau transferred to command the District of Nashville, Loomis transferred as well. At the start of the fall, Loomis had no field-grade officers. That would change in September with a round of promotions which we will note within the administrative details. So looking at the twelve batteries, we find ten of twelve submitted returns:

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  • Battery A / 1st Battery: Reporting from Chattanooga, Tennessee with five 10-pdr Parrott rifles.  Also known as the Loomis Battery, for its first commander.  As related in last quarter’s entry, this battery suffered heavily at Chickamuaga. Among those dead on the field was Lieutenant George W. Van Pelt, the battery commander. Lieutenant Almerick W. Wilbur led the battery to Chattanooga, with what guns and equipment that had been extracted from Chickamauga.  One Parrott was recaptured on Missionary Ridge, presumably rounding out the battery’s set. Francis E. Hale (or Hall, on state records) accepted a promotion to Captain at the end of September to command the battery. The battery remained with First Division, Fourteenth Corps to the end of December. Then it transferred to the garrison of Chattanooga, where it remained for the rest of the war.
  • Battery B / 2nd Battery: Reporting from Pulaski, Tennessee with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and two 10-pdr Parrotts. Lieutenant Albert F. R. Arndt, still in command, was promoted to Captain in early September.  The battery remained assigned to Second Division, Sixteenth Corps.
  • Battery C / 3rd Battery: At Prospect, Tennessee, four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain George Robinson remained in command of this battery. Still with the Sixteenth Corps, the battery was, at the end of December, part of Fuller’s Brigade, Second Division.
  • Battery D / 4th Battery: No return.  From the state Adjutant General’s report, the battery “has always been irregular and remiss in its returns to this office….” Good to see they were consistent in their administrative habits! Captain Josiah W. Church remained in command.  The battery transferred out of the Fourteenth Corps, going to Second Brigade, Second Division, Artillery Reserve for the Army of the Cumberland (Church commanded the brigade in addition to the battery). Having lost almost all its equipment at Chickamauga, the battery reorganized in Chattanooga and received four 20-pdr Parrotts and one 10-pdr Parrott. On November 23, the battery moved to Fort Negley (old Confederate Fort Cheatham) and engaged Confederates at the base of Lookout Mountain, continuing that effort the following day. On the 25th, the battery supported the movement against Missionary Ridge. Church reported firing 135 rounds in those actions. The battery remained at Chattanooga through the winter.
  • Battery E / 5th Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain John J. Ely commanded this battery. With the breakup of the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, the battery transferred commands, if not locations, to the Garrison of Nashville.
  • Battery F / 6th Battery: At Knoxville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Luther F. Hale commanding this battery, was promoted to Major in September. In his place, Lieutenant Byron D. Paddock was promoted to captain. In October, the battery was stationed at Glasgow, Kentucky, in the District of Central Kentucky, Department of the Ohio.  From there, in January 1864, the battery moved over the Cumberland Mountains to Knoxville. Thus we have an explanation for the reported location.
  • Battery G / 7th Battery:  Reporting from Indianola, Texas with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles H. Lanphere resigned his post on September 1, and was replaced by James H. Burdick (promoted to captain on the same day Lanphere resigned). However, Burdick served as an ordnance officer in Thirteenth Corps. In his place, Lieutenant George L. Stillman led the battery. The battery transferred out of the Thirteenth Corps to the Department of the Gulf in August, and was assigned to the garrison of New Orleans. On November 13, the battery boarded steamers for passage to the Texas coast to reinforce Thirteenth Corps operations. After arrival on Matagorda Island, the battery moved to Indianola during the first days of January 1864.
  • Battery H / 8th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 12-pdr field howitzers and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  Promoted on August 8, Captain Jacob L. Richmond commanded the battery. However, Richmond did not spend much time in command, and resigned due to disability in February. Lieutenant Marcus D. Elliot led the battery, appearing on returns through the winter.  The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.
  • Battery I / 9th Battery: Now reporting at Nashville, Tennessee with four 3-inch rifles.  Captain Jabez J. Daniels commanded this battery, then part of the Eleventh Corps. The battery made the move with that formation to reinforce Chattanooga starting in October. Daniels resigned on December 15, and was replaced by Lieutenant (promoted to Captain in January 1864) Addison N. Kidder.
  • Battery K / 10th Battery : At Chattanooga, Tennessee, with four 3-inch rifles.  Captain John C. Schuetz commanded.  The battery was at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. through the last week of October. On October 28, it was transferred to Eleventh Corps and moved with that formation to reinforce Chattanooga. At the close of the year, Schuetz was absent from the battery, and Lieutenant Adolph Schill is listed as temporary commander.
  • Battery L / 11th Battery:  No return.  Under Captain Charles J. Thompson.  As part of Third Division, Twenty-Third Corps, Department of the Ohio, the battery served in the advance to Knoxville in August. In September, the battery joined General Orlando Wilcox’s Division, Left Wing of the Department of the Ohio. With that command, the battery participated in movements around east Tennessee, eventually moving to the Cumberland Gap. For want of supplies, the battery would lose its horses and become, essentially, static artillery for many months into 1864. With Thompson taking ill in December, Lieutenant Thomas Gallagher led the battery.
  • Battery M / 12th Battery:  At Tazewell, Tennessee with six 3-inch rifles.. Captain Edward G. Hillier commanded. The battery joined Wilcox’s Division, advancing on the Cumberland Gap, in September. The battery was part of a brigade-sized force pushed out to Tazewell in January.

We move forward with those administrative details to the ammunition on hand, starting with smoothbore rounds:

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  • Battery E (5th Battery): 198 shot and 115 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 157 shot and 185 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 89 shell for 12-pdr field howitzers.

More on the next page:

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  • Battery E (5th Battery): 137 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 89 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 40 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

Hotchkiss rounds to the right of the page:

  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 72 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 102 time fuse shell for 10-pdr Parrott rifles.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 242 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 120 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 179 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 868 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles!

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

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  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 72 percussion fuse shell, 240 bullet shell, and 83 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 47 percussion fuse shell, 140 bullet shell, and 170 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 80 percussion fuse shell, 989 bullet shell, and 203 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 60 percussion fuse shell, 360 bullet shell, and 60 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 165 percussion fuse shell, 402 bullet shell, and 96 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 154 percussion fuse shell and 265 canister for 3-inch rifles.

To the right are columns for James projectiles:

  • Battery H (8th Battery): 1 shot, 127 shell, and 13 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

But look closely, as the column header banner is interrupted across the pages, there are two entry lines for Parrott lines on the far right:

  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrotts.

More Parrott rounds on the next page:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): 462 shell, 55 case, and 275 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 183 shell and 77 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 40 shell, 601 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 177 shell, 141 case, and 62 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

But one entry line for Schenkl projectiles on the right:

  • Battery E (5th Battery): 60 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.

This brings us to the small arms:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): Twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): Twenty Colt army revolvers and forty-three cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): Seventeen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): Twenty-five cavalry sabers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): Twenty-five Colt army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): Nine Colt army revolvers and one cavalry saber.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): Ten Remington army revolvers and thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Fifteen Colt army revolvers and sixty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): Fourteen Colt army revolvers and thirteen foot artillery swords.

Turning next to the cartridge bags reported on hand:

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  • Battery F (6th Battery): Fifty 10-pdr Parrott cartridge bags.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Fifty 3-inch rifle cartridge bags.

Much busier is the next page with pistol cartridges, fuses, powder, and other miscellaneous items:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): 1,500 friction primers and 12 portfires.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 1,278 army caliber pistol cartridges; 464 paper fuses; 773 friction primers; 20 yards of slow match; and 278 pistol percussion caps.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 850 friction primers.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 1,661 friction primers; 16 yards of slow match; and 38 portfires.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 262 friction primers.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 1,321 paper fuses; 78 pounds of cannon powder; 537 friction primers; and 40 yards of slow match.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 100 portfires.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 385 paper fuses; 850 friction primers; 24 yards of slow match; and 36 portfires.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 400 army caliber pistol cartridges; 300 paper fuses; 700 friction primers; and 50 yards of slow match.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 1,000 friction primers and 3 yards of slow match.

I would say the only real gap with the 1st Michigan Light Artillery’s summary is with Battery L (11th Battery). We have a fair written report from Captain Church to indicate what weapons Battery D (4th Battery) had at the battles around Chattanooga. But for Battery L, stuck up on the Cumberland Gap, I do not know what cannon types they had on hand.