Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – 1st Michigan Light Artillery

Michigan “regimented” its batteries in the fall of 1862, and from that time the batteries were officially “lettered” within that regimental system. However, old habits died hard. The clerks at the Ordnance Department continued to reference those units by their numbered designations through the end of 1863. And in their defense, the state’s Adjutant General, in his end of year report, gave the numbered designation in parenthesis after the lettered regimental battery designation (A convention I use here to avoid any ambiguity). We see those twelve batteries with a couple of non-regimental lines in the fourth quarter summaries for 1863:

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Focusing on the 1st Michigan Light Artillery for this post, Colonel Cyrus O. Loomis, originally the captain of Battery A, commanded. Loomis also served as the chief of artillery for First Division (Rousseau), Fourteenth Corps. When Major-General Lovell Rousseau transferred to command the District of Nashville, Loomis transferred as well. At the start of the fall, Loomis had no field-grade officers. That would change in September with a round of promotions which we will note within the administrative details. So looking at the twelve batteries, we find ten of twelve submitted returns:

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  • Battery A / 1st Battery: Reporting from Chattanooga, Tennessee with five 10-pdr Parrott rifles.  Also known as the Loomis Battery, for its first commander.  As related in last quarter’s entry, this battery suffered heavily at Chickamuaga. Among those dead on the field was Lieutenant George W. Van Pelt, the battery commander. Lieutenant Almerick W. Wilbur led the battery to Chattanooga, with what guns and equipment that had been extracted from Chickamauga.  One Parrott was recaptured on Missionary Ridge, presumably rounding out the battery’s set. Francis E. Hale (or Hall, on state records) accepted a promotion to Captain at the end of September to command the battery. The battery remained with First Division, Fourteenth Corps to the end of December. Then it transferred to the garrison of Chattanooga, where it remained for the rest of the war.
  • Battery B / 2nd Battery: Reporting from Pulaski, Tennessee with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and two 10-pdr Parrotts. Lieutenant Albert F. R. Arndt, still in command, was promoted to Captain in early September.  The battery remained assigned to Second Division, Sixteenth Corps.
  • Battery C / 3rd Battery: At Prospect, Tennessee, four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain George Robinson remained in command of this battery. Still with the Sixteenth Corps, the battery was, at the end of December, part of Fuller’s Brigade, Second Division.
  • Battery D / 4th Battery: No return.  From the state Adjutant General’s report, the battery “has always been irregular and remiss in its returns to this office….” Good to see they were consistent in their administrative habits! Captain Josiah W. Church remained in command.  The battery transferred out of the Fourteenth Corps, going to Second Brigade, Second Division, Artillery Reserve for the Army of the Cumberland (Church commanded the brigade in addition to the battery). Having lost almost all its equipment at Chickamauga, the battery reorganized in Chattanooga and received four 20-pdr Parrotts and one 10-pdr Parrott. On November 23, the battery moved to Fort Negley (old Confederate Fort Cheatham) and engaged Confederates at the base of Lookout Mountain, continuing that effort the following day. On the 25th, the battery supported the movement against Missionary Ridge. Church reported firing 135 rounds in those actions. The battery remained at Chattanooga through the winter.
  • Battery E / 5th Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain John J. Ely commanded this battery. With the breakup of the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, the battery transferred commands, if not locations, to the Garrison of Nashville.
  • Battery F / 6th Battery: At Knoxville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Luther F. Hale commanding this battery, was promoted to Major in September. In his place, Lieutenant Byron D. Paddock was promoted to captain. In October, the battery was stationed at Glasgow, Kentucky, in the District of Central Kentucky, Department of the Ohio.  From there, in January 1864, the battery moved over the Cumberland Mountains to Knoxville. Thus we have an explanation for the reported location.
  • Battery G / 7th Battery:  Reporting from Indianola, Texas with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles H. Lanphere resigned his post on September 1, and was replaced by James H. Burdick (promoted to captain on the same day Lanphere resigned). However, Burdick served as an ordnance officer in Thirteenth Corps. In his place, Lieutenant George L. Stillman led the battery. The battery transferred out of the Thirteenth Corps to the Department of the Gulf in August, and was assigned to the garrison of New Orleans. On November 13, the battery boarded steamers for passage to the Texas coast to reinforce Thirteenth Corps operations. After arrival on Matagorda Island, the battery moved to Indianola during the first days of January 1864.
  • Battery H / 8th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 12-pdr field howitzers and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  Promoted on August 8, Captain Jacob L. Richmond commanded the battery. However, Richmond did not spend much time in command, and resigned due to disability in February. Lieutenant Marcus D. Elliot led the battery, appearing on returns through the winter.  The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.
  • Battery I / 9th Battery: Now reporting at Nashville, Tennessee with four 3-inch rifles.  Captain Jabez J. Daniels commanded this battery, then part of the Eleventh Corps. The battery made the move with that formation to reinforce Chattanooga starting in October. Daniels resigned on December 15, and was replaced by Lieutenant (promoted to Captain in January 1864) Addison N. Kidder.
  • Battery K / 10th Battery : At Chattanooga, Tennessee, with four 3-inch rifles.  Captain John C. Schuetz commanded.  The battery was at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. through the last week of October. On October 28, it was transferred to Eleventh Corps and moved with that formation to reinforce Chattanooga. At the close of the year, Schuetz was absent from the battery, and Lieutenant Adolph Schill is listed as temporary commander.
  • Battery L / 11th Battery:  No return.  Under Captain Charles J. Thompson.  As part of Third Division, Twenty-Third Corps, Department of the Ohio, the battery served in the advance to Knoxville in August. In September, the battery joined General Orlando Wilcox’s Division, Left Wing of the Department of the Ohio. With that command, the battery participated in movements around east Tennessee, eventually moving to the Cumberland Gap. For want of supplies, the battery would lose its horses and become, essentially, static artillery for many months into 1864. With Thompson taking ill in December, Lieutenant Thomas Gallagher led the battery.
  • Battery M / 12th Battery:  At Tazewell, Tennessee with six 3-inch rifles.. Captain Edward G. Hillier commanded. The battery joined Wilcox’s Division, advancing on the Cumberland Gap, in September. The battery was part of a brigade-sized force pushed out to Tazewell in January.

We move forward with those administrative details to the ammunition on hand, starting with smoothbore rounds:

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  • Battery E (5th Battery): 198 shot and 115 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 157 shot and 185 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 89 shell for 12-pdr field howitzers.

More on the next page:

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  • Battery E (5th Battery): 137 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 89 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 40 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

Hotchkiss rounds to the right of the page:

  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 72 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 102 time fuse shell for 10-pdr Parrott rifles.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 242 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 120 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 179 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 868 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles!

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

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  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 72 percussion fuse shell, 240 bullet shell, and 83 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 47 percussion fuse shell, 140 bullet shell, and 170 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 80 percussion fuse shell, 989 bullet shell, and 203 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 60 percussion fuse shell, 360 bullet shell, and 60 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 165 percussion fuse shell, 402 bullet shell, and 96 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 154 percussion fuse shell and 265 canister for 3-inch rifles.

To the right are columns for James projectiles:

  • Battery H (8th Battery): 1 shot, 127 shell, and 13 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

But look closely, as the column header banner is interrupted across the pages, there are two entry lines for Parrott lines on the far right:

  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrotts.

More Parrott rounds on the next page:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): 462 shell, 55 case, and 275 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 183 shell and 77 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 40 shell, 601 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 177 shell, 141 case, and 62 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

But one entry line for Schenkl projectiles on the right:

  • Battery E (5th Battery): 60 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.

This brings us to the small arms:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): Twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): Twenty Colt army revolvers and forty-three cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): Seventeen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): Twenty-five cavalry sabers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): Twenty-five Colt army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): Nine Colt army revolvers and one cavalry saber.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): Ten Remington army revolvers and thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Fifteen Colt army revolvers and sixty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): Fourteen Colt army revolvers and thirteen foot artillery swords.

Turning next to the cartridge bags reported on hand:

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  • Battery F (6th Battery): Fifty 10-pdr Parrott cartridge bags.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Fifty 3-inch rifle cartridge bags.

Much busier is the next page with pistol cartridges, fuses, powder, and other miscellaneous items:

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  • Battery A (1st Battery): 1,500 friction primers and 12 portfires.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): 1,278 army caliber pistol cartridges; 464 paper fuses; 773 friction primers; 20 yards of slow match; and 278 pistol percussion caps.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): 850 friction primers.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): 1,661 friction primers; 16 yards of slow match; and 38 portfires.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): 262 friction primers.
  • Battery G (7th Battery): 1,321 paper fuses; 78 pounds of cannon powder; 537 friction primers; and 40 yards of slow match.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): 100 portfires.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): 385 paper fuses; 850 friction primers; 24 yards of slow match; and 36 portfires.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): 400 army caliber pistol cartridges; 300 paper fuses; 700 friction primers; and 50 yards of slow match.
  • Battery M (12th Battery): 1,000 friction primers and 3 yards of slow match.

I would say the only real gap with the 1st Michigan Light Artillery’s summary is with Battery L (11th Battery). We have a fair written report from Captain Church to indicate what weapons Battery D (4th Battery) had at the battles around Chattanooga. But for Battery L, stuck up on the Cumberland Gap, I do not know what cannon types they had on hand.

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Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – Independent Illinois Batteries

We turn now to “below the line,” or at least on the next page, for the listings for independent batteries from Illinois. Nine batteries listed:

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  • Battery A, 3rd Illinois Artillery: At Little Rock, Arkansas with six 3.80-inch James Rifles. As mentioned in earlier summaries, this battery was better known as the Springfield Light Artillery, or Vaughn’s Battery. Commanded by Captain Thomas F. Vaughn, the battery was part of the Arkansas Expedition. By the late fall, with reorganizations, the battery fell under the Second Division, Army of Arkansas. With Vaughn absent, Lieutenant Edward B. Stillings was in temporary command at the end of December.
  • Chicago Board of Trade Battery: At Huntsville, Alabama, with four 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain James H. Stokes was still the battery commander. But as he was detailed to command a division of the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Cumberland, Lieutenant George I. Robinson led the battery. The battery was assigned to Second Division, Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland. They spent most of the fall supporting operations against Confederate raiders, before settling into winter quarters at Huntsville.
  • Chicago Mercantile Battery: At Pass Cavallo, Texas, with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Patrick H. White remained in command. Assigned to the Third Division, Thirteenth Corps, the battery was part of a force sent to the Texas coast at the end of the year.
  • Colvin’s Battery: At Knoxville, Tennessee, with two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles and two 10-pdr Parrotts. This battery was formed in the late summer with men from the 107th Illinois and 33rd Kentucky Infantry (along with some from the 22nd Indiana Battery). By October it was officially carried on the rolls as a battery. Captain John H. Colvin remained in command. The battery participated in the Knoxville Campaign as part of Fourth Division, Twenty-Third Corps. At the end of the year, the battery transferred to the Cavalry, Army of the Ohio.
  • Bridge’s Battery: At Chattanooga, Tennessee, with two 12-pdr Napoleons and six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Lyman Bridges commanded. With reorganizations after Chickamuaga, the battery was assigned to Third Division, Fourth Corps. The battery participated in the operations around Chattanooga that fall. They were among the batteries thrown forward to Orchard Knob. After victory at Chattanooga, the battery participated in the relief of Knoxville.
  • Elgin or 5th Battery(?): Also known as Renwick’s Battery, after its first commander. Reporting at Mossy (as written, Mofry?) Creek, Tennessee, with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 24-pdr field howitzers. Captain Andrew M. Wood remained in command. And the battery with Second Division, Twenty Third Corps. The battery saw action at the battle of Mossy Creek, on December 29.
  • Henshaw’s Battery: At Loudon, Tennessee, but with no artillery reported. In the previous quarter the battery reported four 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Edward C. Henshaw remained in command. The battery remained with Second Division, Twenty-Third Corps. After the relief of Nashville, the division moved to Loudon. However, they would from there move to Strawberry Plains, east of Knoxville, before wintering at Mossy Creek.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: At Nashville, Tennessee, with four 3.80-inch James rifles. William Cogswell remained the battery captain. As part of Second Division, Seventeenth Corps, the battery was among the force sent to Chattanooga. The battery covered Sherman’s crossing and subsequent actions as the siege of that place was lifted. Then afterward participated in the relief of Knoxville. The battery went into winter quarters in north Alabama. In December the battery was assigned to Third Division, Fifteenth Corps. The Nashville location alludes to the reporting date of August 1864, after the battery was transferred to garrison duties.
  • Lovejoy’s battery: Reporting at Brownsville, Arkansas with two 12-pdr mountain howitzer. This listing does not match with any of the “according to Dyer’s” Indiana batteries. We discussed Lovejoy’s Battery last quarter, but under the Missouri heading. It was a section from the 2nd Missouri Cavalry, Merrill’s Horse, then serving at Brownsville. I’m rather sure this is Lieutenant George F. Lovejoy’s section. But I cannot explain why the Ordnance Department would change the state attribution here.

Let us table Lovejoy’s for the time being and move on to the ammunition. Starting with the smoothbore:

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  • Board of Trade Battery: 139 shot and 224 case for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 32 shell for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Elgin Battery: 34 shot, 36 shell, and 117 case for 12-pdr Napoleons; 135 shell for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery: 28 shell and 96 case for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

We’ll break the next page down into sections, starting with the rest of the smoothbore:

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  • Board of Trade Battery: 197 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 17 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Elgin Battery: 25 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 116 case and 48 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery: 11 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

To the right are listings for Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

  • Mercantile Battery: 512 shot and 281 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 262 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

More Hotchkiss on the next page:

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  • Springfield Light Artillery: 334 percussion fuse shell and 268 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 23 percussion fuse shell and 30 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Mercantile Battery: 240 percussion fuse shell and 138 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Colvin’s Battery: 23 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 240 percussion fuse shell, 240 case shot, and 160 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 170 percussion fuse shell and 149 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

To the right are columns for James patent projectiles:

  • Springfield Light Artillery: 236 shot, 212 shell, and 30 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 40 shot and 41 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 31 shot, 247 shell, and 109 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Then the Parrott and Schenkl sections:

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  • Colvin’s Battery: 56 shell and 19 case Parrott patent for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 104 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Nothing reported on the next page:

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So on to the small arms:

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  • Springfield Light Artillery: ten horse artillery sabers.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 104 Colt army revolvers, three cavalry sabers, and eighteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Mercantile Battery: One Colt army revolver and four horse artillery sabers.
  • Bridge’s Battery: Ten Remington army revolvers, fifteen cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Elgin Battery: Six Remington navy revolvers and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Henshaw’s Battery: Sixteen Colt army revolvers, seven cavalry sabers, and nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: Two Colt navy revolvers and two cavalry sabers.

Cartridge bags reported on hand:

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  • Springfield Light Artillery: 720 bags for James rifles.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 312 bags for James rifles.
  • Mercantile Battery: 40 bags for 3-inch rifles and 165 bags for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 198 bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 752 bags for James rifles.

Lastly, small arms cartridges, fuses, friction primers, and other items to cause a boom:

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  • Springfield Light Artillery: 939 friction primers.
  • Board of Trade Battery: 2128 friction primers and 250 percussion caps.
  • Mercantile Battery: 550 paper fuses, 123 friction primers, and two yards of slow match.
  • Bridge’s Battery: 800 pistol cartridges, 600 paper fuses, 595 friction primers, six yards of slow match, 150 percussion pistol caps, 560 percussion caps, and 27 portfires.
  • Elgin Battery: 800 friction primers.
  • Cogswell’s Battery: 740 friction primers and 12 portfires.

Between December 1863 and the end of the war, many of these Illinois independent batteries ceased to be independent. As the batteries from the 1st and 2nd Illinois Artillery saw their members mustering out, and as some of those lettered batteries consolidated, the independent batteries were redesignated. Because of that, the Illinois records appear disconnected at points in 1864 and 1865. Sad, because many of these are batteries with enviable service records.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Miscellaneous Ohio artillery

The last battery in the long list of Ohio independent batteries is the 26th Ohio Independent Battery.  The transformation of “Yost’s Captured Battery” of the 32nd Ohio Infantry into the 26th Ohio Battery… administrative that it was… is a good starting point for discussing a couple of lines from the third quarter 1863 summary statements from Ohio.  These two lines cover infantry regiments reporting, dutifully, about cannon in their possession:

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Those two lines, for those who won’t click the image to “embiggin,” read:

  • Company K, 86th Ohio Infantry:  Indicating “Artillery Stores” on hand at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. The company reported one 6-pdr field gun, two 12-pdr mountain howitzers, one 12-pdr field howitzer, one 3-inch (steel or iron) rifle, and one 3.80-inch James rifle.  I’ll discuss this company and regiment in more detail below.
  • Company H, 71st Ohio Infantry:  Again “artillery stores” on hand.  In this case at Carthage, Tennessee.  The 71st Ohio reported two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.

Let’s look at these in detail.

86th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

First in the queue and perhaps the most interesting in regard to the background story is this less-well known regiment.  First off, there were two 86th Ohios during the war. The first mustered in the June 1862 as a three month regiment.  They mustered out in late September 1862.  So not the 86th we are looking for here.  The second 86th Ohio mustered (or re-organized, as some sources indicate) as a six-month regiment on July 17, 1863 at Camp Cleveland, Ohio.  The muster was in response to Confederate activity, and akin to the militia and other emergency musters seen in other northern states.  Colonel Wilson C. Lemert (formerly the major of the original 86th) commanded.

The “hot issue” in Ohio at that time was Morgan’s Raid.  So the 86th moved to Camp Tod, Columbus, Ohio, and operated in pursuit of the raiders.  On August 11, the regiment moved to Camp Nelson, Kentucky.  There, the regiment joined Colonel John De Courcy’s brigade which was moving on the Cumberland Gap.  On September 9, the 86th deployed on the Harlen Road, leading into the north side of the gap, along with two guns from the 22nd Ohio Independent Battery, confronting one of the Confederate forts.   Concurrently, other Federal troops deployed to cover approaches on both sides of the gap.  This compelled the Confederates to surrender.  A bloodless victory for Burnside.

And with that surrender, a substantial amount of stores fell into Federal hands.  Captain Henry M. Neil, 22nd Ohio Battery, provided a list of those in a detailed report:

CumberlandGapCapturedStores

Most of these cannon and ordnance stores were repurposed by the Federals to help establish their garrison in the Cumberland Gap.  And the 86th Ohio was part of that garrison. Matching Neil’s report with the summary, it seems one of the bronze 6-pdr field guns, the two 12-pdr mountain howitzers, and one James rifle were assigned to the 86th. Those are simple, easy matches.

The summary indicates the 86th had a bronze 12-pdr field howitzer, but Neil indicates two iron 12-pdr field howitzer among those captured.  So we have to consider if the clerks in Washington simply tallied an iron howitzer as bronze; if the 86th reported a bronze howitzer where in fact that was an iron howitzer; if Neil got the description wrong; or… if the 86th received a bronze howitzer from another source.

Lastly, Neil did not mention any 3-inch rifles among the captured guns.  Or for that matter any 3-inch ammunition.  I suspect this came from another source (other than the captured lot).  However, we might entertain the possibility that a Confederate 3-inch rifle was among those turned over to the 86th Ohio.  Perhaps a slim possibility.

Either from capture or reorganization, the 86th Ohio had six cannon by the end of September, 1863.  These were commanded by Captain James W. Owens of Company K.  The 86th Ohio remained at the Cumberland Gap through the middle of January 1864.  At that time, they started a long seven day winter march out of the mountains and back to Ohio.  They were mustered out on February 10, 1864.  The cannon, however, were left up at the Cumberland Gap.

71st Ohio Volunteer Infantry

In the words of one historian, this regiment had a checkered wartime service but in the end was “redeemed” in battle. Suffering from a bad reputation after Shiloh and having been captured in August 1862, the regiment was mostly assigned to garrison duties.  In the summer of 1863, the regiment was assigned to First Brigade, Third Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.  The regiment had duties protecting the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, with headquarters at Gallatin, Tennessee.  Colonel Henry K. McConnell commanded.

Carthage, Tennessee, was indeed one of the points garrisoned by the Third Division of the Reserve Corps.  But there are no specific details I’ve found regarding details from the 71st assigned to that garrison.  Though it was a concentration point for Tennessee unionists being formed into regiments.  Furthermore, as Burnside reached Knoxville, Carthage, with its position on the Cumberland River, became an important connection between two armies then operating in Tennessee.

We can confirm that two 3-inch Ordnance rifles were at Carthage, however.  In a January 14, 1864 report on the artillery within the Department of the Cumberland, Major John Mendenhall commented that a lieutenant and thirteen men from the 13th Indiana Battery were at that post with the two rifles. So perhaps, for a short period during the summer and fall of 1863, the 71st Ohio had charge of those guns in Carthage.  If I read the column correctly, and that assignment was to Company H, then Captain Elihu S. Williams of that company was responsible for the guns.

Ammunition reported

Smoothbore first:

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  • 86th Ohio: 203 shot, 100 case, and 95 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 6 shot for 12-pdr field guns; 34 shell and 13 case for 12-pdr field howitzers; and 26 canister for either 12-pdr field howitzers or 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

Referencing Neil’s report, it appears the 86th Ohio received only a portion of the overall ammunition stores.  Perhaps only a portion issued for ready use, while the rest remained in centralized magazines?  The presence of shot for 12-pdr field guns opens questions. Neil reported the Confederates had, what would be non-standard, 12-pdr shot for their howitzers.  So is this six 12-pdr shot for field guns? Or for howitzers?  I could see either being the case.

The 71st Ohio reported Hotchkiss rounds for their Ordnance rifles:

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  • 71st Ohio Infantry:  43 canister, 9 percussion shell, and 290 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

Now back to the Cumberland Gap, where the 86th reported James projectiles on hand:

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  • 86th Ohio Infantry: 61 shot and 77 shell for 3.80-inch James.

The questions here, with respect to what Neil reported, is if the shells are percussion shell and if these are “Federal” James projectiles being recaptured…. or Confederate copies.

Neither infantry regiment reported Schenkl projectiles on hand.  And they did not tally any small arms for these detachments.  But I’ve posted those blank pages out of habit.

Before leaving this discussion of Ohio’s non-artillery formations that happened to have cannon on hand, we have one other organization that is not listed on the summary.  In mid-1863, returns from central Tennessee included an organization titled “Law’s Howitzer Battery” or simply “Mountain Howitzer Battery” under Lieutenant Jesse S. Law.

We can trace that battery back to a report from Colonel August V. Kautz, 2nd Ohio Cavalry, written on June 11, 1863 concerning a demonstration made to Monticello, Kentucky a few days before.  A minor affair of only passing interest.  But what concerns us is this accolade:

I must not forget to mention the gallant conduct of Private Jesse Law, commanding the howitzer battery.  This man well deserves a commission, and has been recommended for promotion.

And indeed, Private Law was soon Lieutenant Law. And he remained in charge of four mountain howitzers. This battery supported Kautz’ brigade, First Division, Twenty-Third Corps, which was part of Burnside’s campaign in east Tennessee.  Late in the campaign the battery remained intact, but serving separate from the 2nd Ohio Cavalry.  With that, we can place the howitzers, and Law, somewhere around Knoxville at the close of the third quarter, 1863.  However it appears by the end of the year Law’s howitzers were turned over to some other organization and the Lieutenant resumed cavalry duties.

As for Law himself, I’ve got a lot of information about his career still being complied and organized.  Not ready to post that just yet.  I am fairly confident in saying he was an artilleryvman before the war with Battery G, 4th US.  And he was discharged just after the battle of Antietam.  From there, he enlisted in the 2nd Ohio Cavalry and later received the promotion mentioned above.  Unfortunately, Law didn’t retain those lieutenant bars long.  Law was dismissed from the service in December 1864.  The details of that part of the story I am still working on.

 

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 2

Twenty-six independent batteries from Ohio, recall?  But only twenty-four of those might properly be called “complete” as Ohio batteries.  We looked at what the first dozen of those were doing in the third quarter, 1863.  So we turn now to the remainder:

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Looking at each battery in detail:

  • 13th Battery: Not listed.  Most histories indicate this battery was never fully organized and ceased to exist, officially, in April 1862. But that’s not exactly accurate.  The battery did organize and saw action at Shiloh.  There it lost five of six guns (for a good, brief discussion, see this article).  As the battery fell into disfavor (and likely was the scapegoat for the poor performance of a division commander…) it was disbanded. The men and equipment remaining were distributed to other Ohio batteries (namely the 7th, 10th, and 14th Batteries).
  • 14th Battery: Reporting at Corinth, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. The battery was part of Second Division, Sixteenth Corps.   Captain Jerome B. Burrows remained in command.  In November, the battery was part of the “Left Wing” of the corps, advanced to Lynnville, in south-central Tennessee to guard the sensitive supply lines in that area.
  • 15th Battery: At Natchez, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns.  Captain Edward Spear, Jr. remained in command.  The battery was in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps at the end of the Vicksburg campaign. And it took part in the Jackson Campaign which followed.  Transferred in late July, with the division, to the Seventeenth Corps, it formed part of the garrison of Natchez. The battery took part in an expedition to Harrisonburg, Louisiana in September.
  • 16th Battery: Reporting at Carrollton, Louisiana with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Russell P. Twist remained in command.  The battery was with Third Division, Thirteenth Corps, recently transferred to the Department of the Gulf.  In late September, the battery transferred to Berwick Bay (Morgan City), southwest of New Orleans, for garrison duty.
  • 17th Battery: At Vermilion Bridge, Louisiana with six 10-pdr Parrotts. The battery was assigned to Tenth Division (re-designated Fourth), Thirteenth Corps.  When transferred to the Department of the Gulf, the battery was assigned to the garrison at Brashear City (Morgan City), Louisiana.  Later the battery moved to the location given in the return. The battery was among the forces used in the Teche Expedition in October. Captain Charles S. Rice remained in command.
  • 18th Battery: No report.  Captain Charles Aleshire’s battery was in First Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and had six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  The battery saw action on September 18, supporting the division along the Ringold Road. And was in action again on September 20 on Snodgrass Hill on the left end of the Federal line. With the general withdrawal that evening, the battery returned to Chattanooga.
  • 19th Battery: At Knoxville, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Joseph C. Shields commanded this battery, assigned to the Twenty-third Corps.  After contributing to the pursuit of Morgan in July, the battery was among the forces under General Burnside’s East Tennessee Campaign.
  • 20th Battery: Reporting, in May 1864, at Nashville, Tennessee with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. However, the battery actually had two 12-pdr Napoleons, not field howitzers. The entry is a clerical data-entry error. The battery remained under Captain [John T.] Edward Grosskopff  and assigned to assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps. And the battery was with that division at Chickamauga. Grosskopff reported firing 85 rounds of ammunition at Chickamagua.  In terms of material, he lost only one caisson.  The location for this battery, for the end of the quarter, is accurately Chattanooga.
  • 21st Battery: At Greenville, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain James W. Patterson commanded.  Recall this battery was organized in April 1863.  After assisting with the pursuit of Morgan in July, the battery remained at Camp Dennison, Ohio, through much of the summer. Only in September did they move to Camp Nelson, Kentucky.  They arrived in Greenville, as the return indicates, around the first of October. The battery was part of the “Left Wing Forces” of the Ninth Corps.
  • 22nd Battery: No report.  The battery began the quarter stationed at Camp Chase, Ohio, where they’d just received their full complement of six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Commanded by Captain Henry M. Neil, the battery would not move out of Ohio until mid-August.  After spending time at Camp Nelson, the battery was dispatched with other forces to the Cumberland Gap, as part of the “Left Wing Forces” of the Ninth Corps.  According to the department returns at that time, Neil was serving as Artillery Chief for the Second Division, Ninth Corps.  And in his absence, Lieutenant Amos B. Alger led the battery.
  • 23rd Battery: Not listed. This battery was formed from the 2nd Kentucky Infantry and later became the 1st Kentucky Independent Light Battery. Only mentioned here due to “placeholder” status.
  • 24th Battery:  At Cincinnati, Ohio with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Officially mustered on August 4, this battery was posted to Camp Dennison until September 22, when they moved to Cincinnati.  Captain John L. Hill commanded.
  • 25th Battery: Reporting from Little Rock, Arkansas, in May 1864, with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and four 3.67-inch rifles.  Captain Julius L. Hadley remained in command.  Assigned to First Cavalry Division, Department of Southeast Missouri, the battery served on expeditions into northeast Arkansas in July.  In August, the battery was among the forces sent toward Little Rock as part of Steele’s Expedition.
  • 26th Battery:  At Vicksburg, Mississippi, with no cannon reported. An interesting unit history, originally being a company in the 32nd Ohio Infantry, that I alluded to in the last quarter.  Briefly, detailed to artillery service earlier in the war, but still under the 32nd Infantry, the battery was captured at Harpers Ferry in September 1862.  Exchanged, the “battery” resumed infantry duties.  That is until during the siege at Vicksburg when captured Confederate cannon were assigned to the regiment.  “Yost’s Captured Battery”, named for Captain Theobold D. Yost, served in the siege lines, being highly regarded by senior officers.  And after the fall of Vicksburg the men of this temporary battery were detached to Battery D, 1st Illinois and the 3rd Ohio Independent Battery.  Yost would command the Illinois battery for a short time that summer. Not until December was the 26th formally authorized.  While not officially a battery at the end of September 1863, the men would would form the 26th were indeed stationed around Vicksburg.

Those details established, we turn to the smoothbore ammunition:

0283_1_Snip_OH_Ind_2

Six lines to consider:

  • 14th Battery:  60 shot, 32 shell, 106 case, and 50 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 15th Battery: 220 shot, 132 case, and 220 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 16th Battery: 44 shot, 123 shell, 169 case, and 48 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 74 shot, 230 shell, 269 case, and 234 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: 47 shot and 39 shell for 12-pdr Napoleons; 32 case and 32 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.  As with the issue mentioned above for this battery, the howitzer ammunition tallies are likely a data-entry error and should be 12-pdr Napoleon rounds.
  • 21st Battery: 276 shot, 126 shell, 164 case, and 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the Hotchkiss page:

0283_2_Snip_OH_Ind_2

A mix of calibers here:

  • 14th Battery: 147 canister, 355 percussion shell, and 276 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 88 shot, 70 fuse shell, and 304 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 168 canister, 227 percussion shell, and 351 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 24th Battery: 48 shot, 168 canister, 120 percussion shell, and 290 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.  Yes, the seldom reported Hotchkiss solid shot for 3-inch rifles!
  • 25th Battery: 116 canister, 85 percussion shell, 43 fuse shell, and 65 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles; 112 shot, 291 percussion shell, and 158 fuse shell for “12-pounder” 3.67-inch rifles.

Two entries in the Hotchkiss columns on the next page:

0284_1H_Snip_OH_Ind_2

  • 16th Battery: 104 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 216 canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

No James projectiles reported, for what it is worth.

But one battery with Parrott guns:

0284_1P_Snip_OH_Ind_2

  • 17th Battery: 48 shot, 677 shell, 155 case, and 363 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

We turn then to the Schenkl page:

0284_2_Snip_OH_Ind_2

  • 24th Battery: 720 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 37 shell and 46 case for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly, we have the small arms reported on hand:

0284_3_Snip_OH_Ind_2

By battery:

  • 14th Battery: Thirty army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: Twenty-four navy revolvers and two cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Eight army revolvers.
  • 19th Battery: Thirty navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 20th Battery: Eight army revolvers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 21st Battery: Twenty-eight navy revolvers and thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 24th Battery: Thirty army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 25th Battery: Twenty-six navy revolvers and fourteen cavalry sabers.

That concludes the Ohio independent batteries.  Next we will look at a couple of lines below those listings, covering artillery reported from infantry regiments.  And I’ll mention a couple that escaped notice of the Ordnance officers.

 

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 2nd New York Heavy Artillery Regiment

The 2nd New York Artillery Regiment mustered, by company, through the fall and winter of 1861 at Staten Island.  Moving in batches of companies, the regiment moved to Washington, D.C. and became part of the capital’s defenses through the first half of the war.  As related in the previous quarter, there was one “black sheep” in this regiment – Battery L.

In June 1862, Battery L took to the field as field artillery assigned to the Second Corps, Army of Virginia.  The battery saw action at Cedar Mountain and the Northern Virginia Campaign which followed.  With reorganizations that followed Second Manassas, Battery L went to Ninth Corps.  They saw action at Antietam and later at Fredericksburg, remaining with their new formation through the winter that followed.  And when Burnside took the Ninth Corps west, Battery L transferred to Kentucky.  In June, 1863, the battery was among the reinforcements (two divisions of the corps) sent to Vicksburg.  With the conclusion of that campaign, the Ninth Corps detachment returned to Kentucky and became part of Burnside’s East Tennessee Campaign.  All told, Battery L logged a lot of travel miles in 1863, the majority of which were in transit between theaters of action.

But let’s not get ahead of the summary here.  Just as in the previous quarter, the clerks at the Ordnance Department allocated one line for the 2nd New York Artillery, and that to Battery L:

0273_1_Snip_NY2

  • Battery L:  At Knoxville, Tennessee with four 3-inch steel rifles.  As these were on the Ordnance rifle column the previous quarter, we should question the consistency of the clerks.  Captain Jacob Roemer commanded this battery, then assigned to Second Division, Ninth Corps.  After September, the battery transferred to First Division.  And in November, they were officially removed from the 2nd New York and re-designated the 34th New York Independent Battery.

This battery had no smoothbore ammunition on hand, of course.  But they did report quantities of Hotchkiss:

0275_2_Snip_NY2

  • Battery L: 96 canister, 30 percussion shell, 219 fuse shell and 424 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

No James or Parrott rounds to report.  But the battery had bit of Schenkl mixed in with the Hotchkiss:

0276_2_Snip_NY2

  • Battery L: 30 shells for 3-inch rifles.

And that brings us to the small arms:

0276_3_Snip_NY2

  • Battery L: Twelve Army revolvers and fourteen horse artillery sabers.

While we could put a period here and call our look at the 2nd New York Artillery done, that’s not the whole story.  The rest of those companies (which was often preferred over “battery” for heavy artillery) were still stationed at Washington, D.C., with Colonel Joseph N.G. Whistler commanding.  The regiment served in First Brigade of those forces deployed south of the Potomac (Virginia side).  They are associated with Forts Haggerty, Corcoran, Strong, and C.F. Smith.  Later, in the following spring, the regiment would leave those forts for an assignment with the Army of the Potomac.  But that’s getting ahead of the story a bit.

Looking through the individual companies, here are the command assignments at the time:

  • Company A: Captain William A. Berry.
  • Company B: Captain Michael O’Brien.
  • Company C: Captaincy vacant. Captain George Hogg was dismissed in May (he was reinstated later, but by that time Hogg was mustered as a Major.   Lieutenant Robert K. Stewart the senior officer as of September 1863.
  • Company D: Captain John Jones.
  • Company E: Captain George Klinck.
  • Company F: Captain George S. Dawson.
  • Company G: Captain Thomas J. Clarke.
  • Company H: Captain Charles L. Smith.
  • Company I: Captain Abner C. Griffen.
  • Company K: Captain Pliny L. Joslin.
  • Company L: See above.
  • Company M: Captain Oscar F. Hulser.

Keep in mind the heavy artillery usually worked by detachments of battalion size, assigned to work specific forts.  As such, their structure more closely matched infantry units than their field artillery brethren.  Thus made the field grade officers even more important to the unit.  At that time, Colonel Whistler could call upon Lieutenant-Colonel Jeremiah Palmer, Major William A. McKay, Major Thomas McGuire, the adore-mentioned and Major George Hogg.

It is important to note here the manner for accounting for the artillery for these “heavies”.  The guns were normally assigned to the post, or in this case the fort.  And an officer from the detachment might be detailed as ordinance officer for that fort.  When the unit was reassigned, the detailed officer would transfer control of those cannon to an officer from the unit arriving as replacements… or in the event the fort was dismantled, the detailed officer had the duty of returning the ordnance to a depot or arsenal.  So, while there were certainly field-type artillery in the forts named above, the 2nd New York technically didn’t report those.  Instead, a separate set of books carried returns from the installations, or in this case the forts. We will see in later quarters the divide between “field” and “garrison” reporting is removed to some degree.  Yet, the Ordnance Department continued to insist that units would report only what they had in their direct charge, on their books.  What was with the fort stayed with the fort and was reported by “the fort.”

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Michigan

Michigan provided a full regiment of light artillery to the Federal cause.  As mentioned in previous installments, the clerks identified Michigan’s batteries with numbered designations, as per early war convention.  But the batteries were later designated with letters within the state’s 1st Light Artillery Regiment.  I will merge the two in an attempt to cover all bases here.  (Two more “independent” and numbered batteries would join the list in 1864, but that is for future posts.)

0265_1_Snip_MI

Seven returns for the twelve batteries.  We’ll fill in some blanks:

  • 1st Battery (Battery A): No return.  Also known as the Loomis Battery, for its first commander.  Lieutenant George W. Van Pelt led this battery, supporting First division Fourteenth Corps, into action on September 19, at Chickamauga.   They worked their six (though reports earlier in the year indicated five) 10-pdr Parrotts through four changes of position before firing their first shot in the battle, near (not on) Winfrey Field.  The battery got off only 64 rounds before the Confederates were upon them.  “The men remained with the battery until the enemy’s bayonets were at their breasts,” wrote Captain George Kensel, Division Artillery Chief.  Van Pelt and five of his men were killed.  Six were seriously wounded and thirteen more captured.  Along with much of the battery equipment, five guns were captured.  Lieutenant August H. Bachman managed to extract one of the guns.  Three guns were recaptured later in the battle, but in poor shape.  (Of note… one Parrott was recaptured on Missionary Ridge and the last around Atlanta… and allegedly returned to the battery.)  Lieutenant Almerick W. Wilbur assumed command of the battery in Chattanooga.  With the exception of a few demonstrations, the battery would remain at Chattanooga for the rest of the war.
  • 2nd Battery (Battery B): Reporting from Corinth, Tennessee with two 12-pdr howitzers, two 3-inch Ordnance rifles (moved over from the “steel” column), and two 10-pdr Parrotts. Lieutenant Albert F. R. Arndt, still in command, was promoted to Captain in early September.  The battery remained at Corinth until October, when it moved to Pulaski, Tennessee, as part of the Sixteenth Corps.
  • 3rd Battery (Battery C): Still at Memphis, Tennessee, but now with four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Captain George Robinson remained in command of this battery, assigned to the District of Memphis (Fifth Division), Sixteenth Corps.
  • 4th Battery (Battery D): No return.  In the previous quarter,  Captain Josiah W. Church reported two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 10-pdr Parrotts, and two James 3.80-inch rifles.  And that’s what this battery, supporting Third Division, Fourteenth Corps, took into action at Chickamauga.  We might say this battery was “fought out” by two hard days fighting.  They left the field spent and with only one howitzer.  They lost 35 horses in the battle, but only seven men wounded and four missing.  Church provided a very detailed accounting of all material lost on the field.  So many items listed that I dare say a blank summary line would be close to accurate.  And, from the statements of several, that equipment was not given up without a fight! The battery reorganized in Chattanooga and would receive 20-pdr Parrotts.
  • 5th Battery (Battery E): At Nashville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and four 10-pdr Parrotts. This battery, part of the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, spent most of the summer in Murfreesboro.  In mid-September, Captain John J. Ely’s battery returned to Nashville.
  • 6th Battery (Battery F): At Glasgow, Kentucky with two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  By some reports, the battery had sections at Munfordsville, Bowling Green, and Louisville, through October 1863.  Captain Luther F. Hale commanded overall, and at Munfordsville.  One section of the battery, under Hale, was at Munfordsville.  Another section, under Lieutenant Byron D. Paddock, garrisoned Bowling Green.  In October, both sections merged at Glasgow, Kentucky, part of the District of Central Kentucky, Department of the Ohio.  At that time Hale was promoted to major, and Paddock, with a captain’s commission, took the battery.
  • 7th Battery (Battery G):  At Carrolton, Louisiana with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  The battery was assigned to the Ninth Division, Thirteenth Corps, commanded by Captain Charles H. Lanphere, through August of 1863.  Subsequently assigned to the New Orleans garrison, Department of the Gulf.  Upon Lanphere’s resignation at the first of September, Lieutenant George L. Stillman took over the battery.
  • 8th Battery (Battery H): No return.  In the previous quarter, the battery reported two 12-pdr field howitzers, one 6-pdr (3.67-inch) rifles, and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  With Captain Samuel De Golyer mortally wounded during the Vicksburg Siege, and Captain Theodore W. Lockwood moving to a cavalry unit. Lieutenant Marcus D. Elliot commanded this battery.  The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps and spent the summer at Vicksburg (with most of the battery on furlough).
  • 9th Battery (Battery I): Reporting at Culpeper, Virginia with four 3-inch rifles.  Captain Jabez J. Daniels commanded this battery, assigned to the 1st Horse Artillery Brigade, Army of the Potomac.  The battery was reassigned to the Eleventh Corps in October, and move with that formation to Chattanooga.
  • 10th Battery (Battery K): At Chattanooga, Tennessee, with four 3-inch rifles.  However, this reflects the September 1864 posting date.  In September 1863, the battery was at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C..  Captain John C. Schuetz commanded.  The battery was sent west as part of the reinforcements sent to Chattanooga in November, as part of the Eleventh Corps.
  • 11th Battery (Battery L):  No return.  Under Captain Charles J. Thompson.  After seeing their first service in the response to Morgan’s Raid, the battery joined Third Division, Twenty-Third Corps, Department of the Ohio.  The battery saw service in the advance to Knoxville during the fall.
  • 12th Battery (Battery M):  No return. Captain Edward G. Hillier commanded.  The battery did not leave the state until July 9, being dispatched to Indianapolis in reaction to Morgan’s Raid.  From there, the battery moved to Camp Nelson, Kentucky, in mid-September.  From there, the battery joined Wilcox’s Division, Twenty-Third Corps advancing on the Cumberland Gap.

In the previous quarter, we saw three additional lines under Michigan’s batteries.  One of those was likely a section from the 6th Battery/Battery F.  Another was just reporting stores being held by the 18th Michigan Infantry, which were likely turned in by the end of the summer.  However, it is worth speculating that the 12th Michigan Infantry still retained a 12-pdr field howitzer while marching on Little Rock, Arkansas in the fall.

The first page detailed and some blanks filled in, we proceed to the ammunition pages, with smoothbores the first:

0267_1_Snip_MI

Three batteries reporting:

 

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: 152 shell, 128(?) case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 198 shot, 115 case, and 134 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: 157 shot, 185 case, and 89 canister for 6-pdr field guns.

 

Moving to the Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

0267_2_Snip_MI

Four batteries reporting:

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: 83 canister, 72 percussion shell, 72 fuse shell, and 240 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery / Battery G: 123 canister, 159 fuse shell, and 509 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 9th Battery / Battery I: 360 shot, 60 canister, 60 percussion shell, and 120 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery / Battery K: 402 shot, 96 canister, 165 percussion shell, and 179 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page, we can focus on the Parrott columns:

0268_1P_Snip_MI

Four batteries with quantities:

  • 2th Battery / Battery B: 51 shot, 183 shell, and 77 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: 57 shot, 40 shell, 601 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 129 shot, 383 shell, 40 case, and 170 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: 177 shell, 141 case, and 62 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

And one battery with Schenkls:

0268_2_Snip_MI

  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 60 shell and 100 case for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Lastly, the small arms:

0268_3_Snip_MI

By battery:

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: Twenty Army revolvers and forty-three cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: Eighteen cavalry sabers.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: Twenty-five cavalry sabers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery / Battery G: Nine Army revolvers and one cavalry saber.
  • 9th Battery / Battery I: Eleven Army revolvers and seventeen horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery / Battery H: Fifteen Army revolvers and sixty-nine horse artillery sabers.

Worth noting, Captain Church reported, within a lengthy list of accouterments and implements missing after Chickamauga, the 4th Battery lost four revolvers and five sabers.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Indiana’s batteries, Part 2

We started on the last post working down this long list of Indiana batteries:

0249_1_Snip_IND_Pt1

In that last post, we discussed the first dozen independent batteries.  Picking up there, we have independent batteries 13 through 26:

0249_1_Snip_IND_Pt2

Yes, a baker’s dozen plus one.  But with those fourteen batteries, we actually have less numbers to consider as only half provided returns.  So a lot of administrative holes to resolve:

  • 13th Battery: No return.  Captain Benjamin S. Nicklin’s battery remained at Gallatin, Tennessee, garrisoning Fort Thomas, in the Army of the Cumberland.
  • 14th Battery: No return.  Lieutenant Francis W. Morse remained in command.  The battery started the summer in Jackson, Tennessee.  In June, the battery transferred to the railroad town of LaGrange and remained there for the remainder of the summer.  Presumably still with three 6-pdr field guns and one 3-inch Ordnance Rifle, the battery was part of the Sixteenth Corps’ many garrison commands.
  • 15th Battery: At Oak Springs, Tennessee with six 3-inch rifles.  Captain John C. H. von Sehlen commanded this battery, assigned to Fourth Division, Twenty-Third Corps and part of the campaign moving on Knoxville.   The report location is likely related to the November reporting date.
  • 16th Battery: A return of Fort Washington, Maryland without any guns listed.  There is a faint note “Infy Stores” under the regiment column.  Lieutenant Charles R. Deming’s battery were part of the Washington Defenses.
  • 17th Battery: No return.  At the end of the Gettysburg Campaign, Captain Milton L. Miner’s battery became part of the Maryland Heights Division, Department of West Virginia.  The battery reported six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles in previous quarters.
  • 18th Battery:  No Return. Captain Eli Lilly’s battery supported Wilder’s Brigade, Fourth Division, Fourteenth Corps.  The battery brought six 3-inch rifles and four 12-pdr mountain howitzers to Chickamauga.  The mountain howitzers supported the 72nd Indiana on September 20, and one of those was lost in the fighting.  Lilly reported the lost of two men killed and eight wounded;  six horses (plus one wounded); and expending 778 rounds.  A shame we don’t have a return from this… unique… and storied battery.
  • 19th Battery: Reporting at Chattanooga, Tennessee with three 12-pdr Napoleons and one 3-inch Rifles (not under the usual Ordnance Rifle column). This was a return dated January 1864.  But the location is valid.  Captain Samuel J. Harris’s battery was also part of Fourth Division, Fourteenth Corps and went into action at Chickamuaga with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  On September 19, Harris was “disabled by a contusion” to his right side and turned command over to Lieutenant Robert S. Lackey.  During the fighting that disabled Harris, the battery lost a Napoleon and limber.  On the 20th, Lackey kept the battery in the fight, but would have one surviving Napoleon (axle straps) and a 3-inch rifle disabled.  While the Napoleon was brought off the field, the rifle’s axle came completely off and was had to be left behind.  Harris provided a very detailed statement of lost men, equipment and material after the battle.  In addition to the guns, the battery suffered two killed, 16 wounded, and two missing men.  The battery had fifteen horses lost or killed and six wounded. Harris accounted for four lost pistols, three sabers, seven sponges, four sponge buckets, two prolongs, among other items. The battery expended 350 3-inch rifle rounds and 750 12-pdr in the battle.  Harris recovered and remained in command of the battery.
  • 20th Battery:  At Nashville, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James rifles.  Captain Milton A. Osborne’s battery was assigned to the artillery reserve posted to Nashville, under the Army of the Cumberland. In October, the battery was among the forces pushed out to secure the railroad lines out of Nashville.
  • 21st Battery:  No return.  Captain William W. Andrew’s battery was the third Indiana battery assigned to Fourth Division, Fourteenth Corps.  However, Lieutenant William E. Chess field the battery’s report from the battle and appears to have lead the battery in the action.  They took six 12-pdr Napoleons into action, but lost one (and limber).  Chess recorded firing 10 shot, 168 case, 104 shell, and 160 canister – giving us some indication of the range at which this battery was engaged, and what targets they fired upon, during their part of the battle.
  • 22nd Battery: At Bowling Green, Kentucky with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Under Captain Benjamin F. Denning, this battery was assigned to the Second Division, Twenty-Third Corps, Army of the Ohio.  Through the fall, the battery served at both Bowling Green and Russellsville, Department of Southwestern Kentucky.
  • 23rd Battery:  Reporting at Jonesboro (?), Tennessee with six 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Captain James H. Myers’ battery came across the Ohio River in September and was assigned to the “Left Wing” of Twenty-Third Corps.  Moving by way of the Cumberland Gap, the battery was among the forces operating around Morristown at the start of October.
  • 24th Battery: No return. Under Captain Joseph A. Sims, this battery moved from the Third Division to the Fourth Division in Twenty-Third Corps in August.  Though that move was basically part of the alignment of forces for the campaign on Knoxville.
  • 25th Battery:  No return. The 25th would not organize until the late summer of 1864.  So this is simply a placeholder line.
  • 26th Battery or Wilder’s: At Concord, Tennessee (just west of Knoxville) with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles, with a report date of March, 1864.  Recall this battery was first organized by (then) Captain John T. Wilder, later colonel of the famous “Lightning Brigade.”  The battery was captured at Harpers Ferry in 1862 and then reorganized.  Though given the 26th as a designation, throughout its service the battery was better known as Wilder’s.  Captain Hubbard T. Thomas commanded the battery, assigned to the Twenty-Third Corps.  The battery participated in the Knoxville Campaign in East Tennessee.  The location given in the return, however, likely reflects its winter garrison assignment.

As with the first batch of batteries, we see the “mark” of Chickamauga here reflected with lost cannon and in some cases missing reports.

Making what we can of the small number of returns, we start with the smoothbore ammunition:

0251_1_Snip_IND_Pt2

Three to consider:

  • 19th Battery: 20 shot, 8 shell, 72 case, and 52 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: 189 shot, 150 case, and 35 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 22nd Battery: 98 shot, 119 shell, 144 case, and 121 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Note, the 19th Battery had but 152 rounds for their three Napoleons in the aftermath of Chickamauga.  That is if we take the report as precise for the moment in time.

Moving to the Hotchkiss columns:

0251_2_Snip_IND_Pt2

Four reporting:

  • 15th Battery: 460 canister, 402 fuse shell, and 1246 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 145 percussion shell and 392 bullet shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 23rd Battery: 365 percussion shell, 315 fuse shell, and 95 bullet shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • 26th Battery (Wilder’s): 520 canister, 260 percussion shell, 574 fuse shell, and 426 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

So we see those batteries sent into eastern Tennessee had ample ammunition on hand.

A couple more Hotchkiss entries on the next page:

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Two reporting:

  • 20th Battery: 150 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 210 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

But none of these fourteen batteries had Schenkl projectiles or Tatham’s canister on hand:

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So we move on to the small arms:

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Looking at these by battery:

  • 15th Battery: Twenty-eight Army revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Fourteen percussion pistols and fourteen horse artillery sabers.  I think the pistols are a transcription error, as the battery reported nineteen Army revolvers in the previous quarter.
  • 20th Battery: Twenty-two Army revolvers.
  • 22nd Battery: Thirty-two horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • 26th Battery (Wilder’s): Nineteen horse artillery sabers.

Moving from the independent batteries from Indiana for this quarter, we still have five entries “below the line” to consider.  We’ll pick those up in the next installment.