October 25, 1864: “The morale of the army runined” and Price soundly defeated

After the defeat at Westport on October 23, 1864, Major-General Sterling Price was able to extract his Army of Missouri and begin a retreat southward.  The Federals pursued, of course.  Unlike some campaigns of the Civil War, the pursuit was aggressive and actually landed some blows on the retreating enemy.  Three in fact came inContinue reading “October 25, 1864: “The morale of the army runined” and Price soundly defeated”

“You have doubtless exercised your best judgment…”: Pleasonton, Price, and the Big Blue River

On October 22, 1864, as Major-General Sterling Price’s Army of Missouri continued its march westward, skirting Kansas City, the next major obstacle to cross was the Big Blue River. Minding his wagon train, Price needed a good ford over that river.  The best option for him was Byram’s Ford along the Independence-Westport Road. The viewContinue reading ““You have doubtless exercised your best judgment…”: Pleasonton, Price, and the Big Blue River”

“When he left us a star went out”: Shelby’s lament at the loss of Colonel Shanks

I mentioned Brigadier-General Joseph Shelby’s writing style.  His report of the second half of Major-General Sterling Price’s 1864 Campaign, written in December of that year, is a shade or two more literature than official correspondence.  Relating the details of his division’s advance to the Osage River, earlier in October: I reconnoitered the ford warily, showingContinue reading ““When he left us a star went out”: Shelby’s lament at the loss of Colonel Shanks”