April 2, 1865: “As near as I can judge I expended about 1,000 rounds of ammunition” bombarding Petersburg’s lines

Victory at Five Forks on April 1, 1865 allowed Federal forces to sever the last major supply line – the South Side Railroad – into Petersburg from the west. With that, Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant put in motion his plan to shatter the Petersburg defenses.  Shortly after receiving news from Five Forks, Grant ordered aContinue reading “April 2, 1865: “As near as I can judge I expended about 1,000 rounds of ammunition” bombarding Petersburg’s lines”

“I decidedly prefer the rope mantlets.”: Hunt and Abbot prepare for a siege

Yesterday, I made short reference to Colonel Henry L. Abbot’s suggestion to Brigadier-General Henry Hunt in regard to mantlets for the siege train at Petersburg.  To properly set this part of the story, let me step back to June 14, 1864 and a response from Major-General Delafield, the Army’s Chief Engineer (“Army” as in “allContinue reading ““I decidedly prefer the rope mantlets.”: Hunt and Abbot prepare for a siege”

“The following will be the organization of the artillery of this army”: Artillery consolidation in the AoP, Spring 1864

With my focus on Colonel Charles Wainwright’s diary, I’ve mentioned the consolidation’s effects on the First Corps Artillery, which would become part of the Fifth Corps with the consolidation.  Brigadier-General Henry Hunt took advantage of the consolidation to produce a compact, yet flexible, artillery formation within the Army of the Potomac.  He submitted the detailsContinue reading ““The following will be the organization of the artillery of this army”: Artillery consolidation in the AoP, Spring 1864″