“Foster… was frustrated in his grand stab at Charleston.” – Separating supposition from reliable fact

Over the holiday break, I took to reading H. David Stone’s Vital Rails: The Charleston & Savannah Railroad and the Civil War in Coastal South Carolina.  I’d picked up the book shortly after publication.  But until last month had confined my use of the work to select passages as I “blogged” through the 150ths ofContinue reading ““Foster… was frustrated in his grand stab at Charleston.” – Separating supposition from reliable fact”

“The negro force reduced considerably; more absolutely necessary.”: Third Major Bombardment of Fort Sumter continues

The Third Major Bombardment of Fort Sumter entered a second month in August 1864.  I offered the “by day” Confederate tally of rounds fired at the fort at intervals during July  – July 7-10, July 11-20, and July 21-25.  Over those time, the rate of fire averaged around 15 rounds per hour.  That was “average,”Continue reading ““The negro force reduced considerably; more absolutely necessary.”: Third Major Bombardment of Fort Sumter continues”

“The garrison appears in good spirits.”: Huguenin takes command of Fort Sumter

With the death of Captain John Mitchel on July 20, 1864, Captain Thomas A. Huguenin arrived to assume command of Fort Sumter.  The moment was critical for the garrison, and to no small degree the defenses of Charleston.  Fort Sumter was the absolute front edge of the Confederate defenses and most exposed to Federal attention.  TheContinue reading ““The garrison appears in good spirits.”: Huguenin takes command of Fort Sumter”