Sherman’s March, February 8, 1865: Alabama vs. Alabama outside Williston; “Burn all Cotton”

For the men in Major-General William T. Sherman’s armies moving across South Carolina, February 8, 1865 was either a day of “close up” marching or railroad wrecking.  This is good because as the columns get closer to each other, I’ll be able to narrow down these maps to allow the readers better appreciate the detail!Continue reading “Sherman’s March, February 8, 1865: Alabama vs. Alabama outside Williston; “Burn all Cotton””

Sherman’s March, February 6, 1865: “Burnwell” South Carolina

On February 6, 1865, the arrangement of Major-General William T. Sherman’s forces looked more like a pair of waves as opposed to two wings advancing in parallel.  Ten divisions – the Seventeenth Corps, three divisions of the Fifteenth Corps, two divisions of the Twentieth Corps, and the Cavalry Division – were pressing forward past theContinue reading “Sherman’s March, February 6, 1865: “Burnwell” South Carolina”

Savannah’s Siege, December 20, 1864: “The noise of the retreating enemy could plainly be heard”

For Lieutenant-General William Hardee, December 20, 1864 was a day of anticipation.  Had the pontoon bridge across the Savannah River been ready before dusk the day before, he would have started the evacuation of Savannah.  Instead, he looked to keep up the appearances of holding the city for just one more day and then evacuateContinue reading “Savannah’s Siege, December 20, 1864: “The noise of the retreating enemy could plainly be heard””