Marching Through Georgia, December 4, 1864: “the expected approach of a large force of the enemy” governs Federal movements

A few days ago, I pointed out that the aggregate width of the Federal columns marching through Georgia on November 27, 1864 was about thirty miles.  In contrast, if you were to tour the locations visited on the march for December 4, start at the Brier Creek Bridge north of Waynesboro and drive about 55Continue reading “Marching Through Georgia, December 4, 1864: “the expected approach of a large force of the enemy” governs Federal movements”

Marching Through Georgia, December 3, 1864: Millen suffers for the horrors at Camp Lawton

Throughout 1864, Federal soldiers, from the top ranks down, expressed their disgust in reaction to stories about the prison camps of the south.  On December 3, 1864, a major element of Major-General William T. Sherman’s march reached Camp Lawton and saw first hand what one of those camps looked like… of course, without the prisonersContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, December 3, 1864: Millen suffers for the horrors at Camp Lawton”

Marching Through Georgia, November 25, 1864: Engineers to the front!

The narrative of events on November 25, 1864 for Major-General William T. Sherman’s armies involves several river crossings.  The activities put light on Sherman’s engineers.  Captain Orlando Poe, Sherman’s Chief Engineer, detailed engineer support (men and equipment) by assignment: Right Wing:  1st Missouri Engineers under Lieutenant-Colonel William Tweeddale with 500 men in five companies; AContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, November 25, 1864: Engineers to the front!”