Guns per 1000 infantry? Or guns per 1000 yards of earthwork?

Yesterday I wrote about the reduction of the Artillery Reserve and general reorganization of the artillery arm in the Army of the Potomac from mid-May 1864.  Some historians have offered this as an example of the dominance of rifled musketry on the battlefield – that artillery could no longer move within range to be ofContinue reading “Guns per 1000 infantry? Or guns per 1000 yards of earthwork?”

“… the Reserve was by superior orders broken up…”: Disbanding the Artillery Reserve of the AoP

When the Army of the Potomac marched out of its winter encampment at the beginning of May, arguably the artillery arm was at its best organized, equipped, manned, and stocked levels throughout the war.  With colonels commanding artillery brigades directly supporting the maneuver corps, two horse artillery brigades, foot artillery to guard the trains, andContinue reading ““… the Reserve was by superior orders broken up…”: Disbanding the Artillery Reserve of the AoP”

“Light 12-pounders to be used as mortars”: A Spotsylvania ‘what if?’ from the artillery persepctive

I’m a bit behind on “coverage” of artillery subject on my planned sesquicentennial-themed time line.  So I hope you readers will indulge as I back-track here (and a few more times over the next few weeks), chronologically speaking.  The letter below properly fit into a post for the first week of May when I referredContinue reading ““Light 12-pounders to be used as mortars”: A Spotsylvania ‘what if?’ from the artillery persepctive”