Wainwright’s Diary, January 14, 1864: “how much depends on the care of its horses”

Colonel Charles Wainwright opened his diary entry for January 14, 1864 discussing the horses that moved his batteries. I have just got a curious report from Captain [Joel D.] Cruttenden, my quartermaster, showing the number of horses drawn by each battery in the command since we left White Oak Church.  The Fifth Maine, which startedContinue reading “Wainwright’s Diary, January 14, 1864: “how much depends on the care of its horses””

Caissons for Ammunition: Hunt’s Modest Appeal

Brigadier-General Henry Hunt was never one to settle for “good enough.”  He sought perfection in detail.  After the Gettysburg Campaign, he looked for some means to improve the handling and transportation of artillery ammunition within the Army of the Potomac.  On September 30, 1863, he wrote Brigadier-General Rufus Ingalls to suggest improvements, beginning: In relationContinue reading “Caissons for Ammunition: Hunt’s Modest Appeal”

“…such a palpable crippling of a great arm…”: Hunt’s assessment of Chancellorsville

I don’t think it a stretch to advance the notion May 3, 1863 was the greatest day for Confederate field artillery in the Civil War (although we may also mention August 30, 1862…).  The “Long Arm of Lee” dominated the battlefield around Chancellors Crossroads that day.  One of the few occasions where the Confederate gunnersContinue reading ““…such a palpable crippling of a great arm…”: Hunt’s assessment of Chancellorsville”