“Light 12-pounders to be used as mortars”: A Spotsylvania ‘what if?’ from the artillery persepctive

I’m a bit behind on “coverage” of artillery subject on my planned sesquicentennial-themed time line.  So I hope you readers will indulge as I back-track here (and a few more times over the next few weeks), chronologically speaking.  The letter below properly fit into a post for the first week of May when I referredContinue reading ““Light 12-pounders to be used as mortars”: A Spotsylvania ‘what if?’ from the artillery persepctive”

Abbot to Hunt: “Every step has been taken to hurry forward…”

In April 1864, Brigadier-General Henry Hunt sent recommendations and instructions to form a siege train supporting the Army of the Potomac’s next campaign.  On the first day of May 1864, Colonel Henry Abbot sent an update on his preparations toward that end: Fort Richardson, VA., May 1, 1864. Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, Chief ofContinue reading “Abbot to Hunt: “Every step has been taken to hurry forward…””

“It is a cross between the gun and mortar without the advantages of either”: Hunt’s dislike of howitzers (again)

On April 23, 1864, Brigadier-General Henry Hunt passed additional instructions on to Colonel Henry L. Abbot, who was tapped to form and lead a siege train held in reserve for the Army of the Potomac.  Abbot’s task was not necessarily daunting, but required attention to detail to meet specific requirements.  Should a siege train beContinue reading ““It is a cross between the gun and mortar without the advantages of either”: Hunt’s dislike of howitzers (again)”