“Every house… is a nest of treason.”: General Orders No. 42 for the Cavalry Corps

On this day (November 5) in 1863, Major-General Alfred Pleasonton issued General Orders No. 42 from his headquarters: The loss in officers and men sustained in this corps at the hands of guerrillas during the past few days demands the careful attention of all to prevent a recurrence in the future. The command is admonishedContinue reading ““Every house… is a nest of treason.”: General Orders No. 42 for the Cavalry Corps”

“Piracy more outragous than that of Semmes”: Lowell’s response to Darien, Ga.

If you have studied the Civil War for any length and to any depth, you’ll see the threads cross more often than not.  I’ve been writing, here on the blog, for the last few months about activities that occurred 150 years ago in South Carolina and Georgia. But of late I’ve changed focus to eventsContinue reading ““Piracy more outragous than that of Semmes”: Lowell’s response to Darien, Ga.”

150 years ago: The burning of Hopefield, Arkansas

Major-General Stephen A. Hurlbut was tired of dealing with Confederate guerrillas operating just across the Mississippi River from Memphis, Tennessee. On the night of February 17, 1863, Captain James H. McGehee’s unattached Arkansas cavalry attacked the tug Hercules as it lay off Hopefield. McGehee captured the tug and several coal barges, but had to burnContinue reading “150 years ago: The burning of Hopefield, Arkansas”