January 7, 1865 -“I do not regard Charleston… of any military importance.”: No offensive against Charleston planned

During the first weeks of January 1865, Major-General William T. Sherman completed preparations for a campaign into South Carolina.  A question lingered in regard to objectives.  Should Sherman direct his columns against Charleston? Sherman had already voiced his opinion to Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant on the matter.  And on January 7, 1865, Grant indicated hisContinue reading “January 7, 1865 -“I do not regard Charleston… of any military importance.”: No offensive against Charleston planned”

Dahlgren’s unease: “Work performed is neither known nor appreciated”

Yesterday’s post concluded that Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, while citing the torpedoes in Charleston harbor, considered the greatest risk to be the loss of a monitor.  That potential risk weighed heavily on both the military and political scales.  However, the admiral faced a dilemma.  His predecessor fell into disfavor due to a failed assault on the sameContinue reading “Dahlgren’s unease: “Work performed is neither known nor appreciated””