Sherman’s March, March 21, 1865: “the skirmish line of the Sixty-fourth Illinois advanced to within 200 yards of General Johnston’s headquarters”

March 21, 1865 might have gone down as an anti-climactic day at the close of the Battle of Bentonville.  General Joseph E. Johnston said he wanted to recover his wounded as the justification for staying one more day in front of Sherman.  More likely, he hoped that Sherman might attempt an assault on the works. Continue reading “Sherman’s March, March 21, 1865: “the skirmish line of the Sixty-fourth Illinois advanced to within 200 yards of General Johnston’s headquarters””

Sherman’s March, March 2, 1865: “To be shot to death in retaliation for the murder of Private R. M. Woodruff”

During the first days of March, 1865, Major-General William T. Sherman expressed some concern about Confederate concentrations in front of his force.  During the last days of February, Sherman’s columns were at a standstill as they dealt with flooded rivers. Orders to the Right Wing commander, Major-General Oliver O. Howard, during that time were toContinue reading “Sherman’s March, March 2, 1865: “To be shot to death in retaliation for the murder of Private R. M. Woodruff””

Sherman’s March, February 7, 1865: The South Carolina Railroad falls to Sherman

Thus far into the narrative discussing Major-General William T. Sherman’s march into South Carolina, one major factor which played into the Savannah Campaign had not been much importance.  That would be the railroads.  Other than the Charleston & Savannah Railroad along the coast, the Federal advance encountered no lines. That is until February 7, 1865. Continue reading “Sherman’s March, February 7, 1865: The South Carolina Railroad falls to Sherman”