Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 3

We start this, the third and final installment for the New York Independent Batteries and the summaries of their third quarter returns, looking at less than a dozen lines:

0273_1_Snip_NY_IND3 But, there were, technically speaking, independent batteries numbered 25 to 36 around in the third quarter.  But the clerks at the ordnance department cut that tally short for reasons we will explore.  So let us consider these batteries in detail:

  • 25th Battery: No return.  Recall, while in transit to New Orleans in January, this battery’s transport wrecked.  This “hard luck” battery remained at New Orleans, assigned to the Fourth Division, Nineteenth Corps through October as part of the city defenses.  Captain John A. Grow remained in command.  In the previous quarter, the battery reported four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.
  • 26th Battery: Reprting at Thibodaux, Louisiana, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Also suffering loss in the January shipwreck, the 26th was, at the reporting time, part of the District of LaFourche. Captain George W. Fox remained in command of the battery, organizationally assigned to the Fourth Division, Nineteenth Corps.
  • 27th Battery: At Camp Niagara (?), Pennsylvania with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  In July the battery moved from Camp Barry, D.C. to the Department of the Susquehanna, and assigned to the garrison at Philadelphia. Captain John B. Eaton commanded this battery.
  • 28th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with “infantry stores.”  The battery served at Fort Schuyler and Sandy Hook.  Captain Josiah C. Hannum retained command.
  • 29th Battery: No return. At the end of June, the battery was run down with troops with remaining enlistments assigned to the 32nd Battery.  However, at least through the first week of July the battery remained on the organizational returns, assigned to the Harpers Ferry garrison. Captain Otto Diedrich remained commander, on paper at least.
  • 30th Battery: On Maryland Heights, Maryland, with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Adolph Voegelee was dismissed in August, having not been in the field for some time.  Lieutenant Alfred Von Kleiser, who’d lead the battery through much of the last year, was promoted to battery captain in his place.   At this time of the war, the battery was part of the Department of West Virginia.
  • 31st Battery: No return.  Captain Gustav Von Blucher was in command.  The battery appears in the Department of West Virginia. But as it was reduced, with many of the men attached to the 30th Battery, the battery was in effect only a paper designation. Von Blucher himself was serving as a staff officer with the Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac.
  • 32nd Battery: At Maryland Heights, Maryland with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Kusserow remained in command.  And the battery remained with  Maryland Heights Division, staying there as the command was folded into the Department of West Virginia.
  • 33rd Battery:  No return.  Authorized on July 9, 1863, mustered on September 4.  It was initially assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, Camp Barry, in the Department of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).   Captain Algar M. Wheeler commanded.  However, with Wheeler still in New York, Lieutenant J. DeWitt Woods held operational command of the battery at its first posting.
  • 34th Battery: Not listed. This number was reserved for Battery L, 2nd New York Artillery. Captain Jacob Roemer’s battery, then serving in East Tennessee, would officially take it’s “Independent” number in November.
  • 35th Battery: Not listed. Authorized on July 9.  Captain James B. Caryle was given the commission to recruit the battery.  But it never completed organization.  The authority was recalled. The recruited men were assigned to Battery A, 16th New York Heavy Artillery.
  • 36th Battery:  Not listed.  On August 11, 1863, Captain Charles Graham Bacon was authorized to recruit this battery. On October 14, authority was revoked and the men recruited by that time were transferred to the 13th New York Heavy Artillery.

See?  An even dozen in existence, even if only on paper.  Those in actual service being mainly in “garrisons” – New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Harpers Ferry, and New Orleans.  But still having equipment to account for.

And ammunition on hand.  We start with the smoothbores:

0275_1_Snip_NY_IND3

Three batteries reporting:

  • 26th Battery: 148 shot, 12 shell, 48 case, and 12 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 27th Battery: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 30th Battery: 308 shot, 128 shell, 320 case, and 112 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

But just one line for the Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

0275_2_Snip_NY_IND3

  • 32nd Battery: 120 canister and 104 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

No entries on the next page, so we skip to the Schenkl projectiles:

0276_2_Snip_NY_IND3

  • 32nd Battery: 583 shell and 393 case for 3-inch rifles.

That leads us to the small arms on hand:

0276_3_Snip_NY_IND3

By battery reporting:

  • 26th Battery: Twenty-five (?) army revolvers, twelve cavalry sabers, and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • 27th Battery: Seventeen army revolvers, thirty cavalry sabers, and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 30th Battery: Six army revolvers and fifteen cavalry sabers.
  • 32nd Battery: Nine army revolvers, thirty-six cavalry sabers, and eleven foot artillery swords.

This wraps up the entire page from the third quarter 1863 summaries allocated to New York units.  In addition to these light batteries, New York provided several heavy artillery organizations.  As those fall outside these summaries, I’ll look at those at the end of the quarter’s entries as part of a broader look at all the “heavies” then in service.

 

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Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 2

In the previous installment, for the third quarter of 1863 we detailed the first dozen New York Independent Batteries.  Of those still on active duty, their service was almost entirely in Virginia (with one battery in the District of Columbia the exception).  But for the next dozen – 13th through 24th Batteries – we find greater geographic distribution:

0273_1_Snip_NY_IND2 Note that nine of the twelve have returns.  Six were timely – arriving in October or November of 1863.  But the other three were tardy, with one arriving in February the next year, another in October 1864, and the last not until May 1865 (perhaps as the battery was attending the last details of paperwork before mustering out?):

  • 13th Independent Battery: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  When the Eleventh Corps left Culpeper, Virginia, to reinforce Chattanooga, during the last week of September, the 13th Battery was among their number.  Captain William Wheeler, promoted in August, commanded the battery.
  • 14th Independent Battery: No return. This battery was broken up starting in the spring of 1862.  The first section was initially assigned to Battery C, 4th US Artillery, in March 1862, but later transferred to Battery G, 1st New York Artillery, in January 1863.  The second section was also transferred to Battery G, 1st New York, in May 1862.  At the same time the third section went to Battery B, 1st New York in May 1862.  The battery was formally disbanded in September 1863.  It’s last commander, Captain James Rorty, was killed in action at Gettysburg while in temporary with Battery B, 1st New York.
  • 15th Battery:  In Culpeper, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery “made the rounds” in the Artillery Reserve of the Army of the Potomac.  Under Captain Patrick Hart, the battery started the summer in the 1st Volunteer Brigade of that reserve.  In early August, they moved to the 4th Volunteer Brigade.  But by the end of the month, they were assigned to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade.
  • 16th Battery: No return. Captain Frederick L. Hiller’s battery remained with the Seventh Corps and stationed at Newport News, Virginia. Earlier in the year, the battery reported six 10-pdr Parrott Rifles.
  • 17th Battery: In Centreville, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain George T. Anthony’s battery was at that time assigned to King’s Division, the Defenses of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).
  • 18th Battery: At Baton Rouge, Louisiana with four (down from six) 20-pdr Parrotts.  The report was not received in Washington until May 1865!  After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery was sent to the defenses of New Orleans, still in the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain Albert G. Mack retained command.
  • 19th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. At the end of June, the 19th Battery transferred from the Seventh Corps (serving at Suffolk) to the Washington Defenses, Twenty-second Corps.  Captain William H. Stahl succumbed to typhoid fever on September 15, 1863.  Captain Edward W. Rogers replaced him.
  • 20th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with “infantry stores” only.  Captain  Benjamin Franklin Ryer’s battery served as garrison artillery.  The battery helped suppress the New York riots in July.  And that was, more or less, their “combat” for the war.
  • 21st Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with four 3-inch steel guns (make and model unspecified). The report is from February 1864.  After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery remained at that post, as part of the Reserve Artillery of the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain James Barnes remained in command.
  • 22nd Battery: No return. Earlier in February 1863 the battery became Company M, 9th New York Heavy Artillery.  The designation remained on the clerk’s report as a placeholder.
  • 23rd Battery: Washington, North Carolina with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Originally, Battery A of the New York Rocket Battalion. Captain Alfred Ransom was in charge of this battery, assigned to the District of Pamlico, Eighteenth Corps, Department of North Carolina.
  • 24th Battery: At Plymouth, North Carolina with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Another formerly of the Rocket Battalion, in this case former Battery B.  This battery was also assigned to the District of Albemarle, Eighteenth Corps, Department of North Carolina.  Captain A. Lester Cady remained in command.

 

Those details covered, we move to the ammunition and start with the smoothbore rounds:

0275_1_Snip_NY_IND2

All Napoleons:

  • 15th Battery: 128 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 288 shot. 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 24th Battery: 359 shot, 214 shell, 448 case, and 368 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Four lines on the Hotchkiss page:

0275_2_Snip_NY_IND2

So four batteries:

  • 13th Battery: 80 canister, 160 fuse shell, and 480 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 95 shell for 3.67-inch rifles (in this case 20-pdr Parrotts).
  • 21st Battery: 138 canister, 20 fuse shell, and 583 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 197 canister, 137 percussion shell, 360 fuse shell, and 565 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page, we can focus on just the Parrott columns:

0276_1P_Snip_NY_IND2

And that’s just for the 20-pdr Parrotts in New Orleans:

  • 18th Battery: 138 shot, 216 shell, and 89 canister for 20-pdr Parrott.

A single entry on the Schenkl page:

0276_2_Snip_NY_IND2

  • 13th Battery: 80 Schenkl shell for 3-inch rifles.

That leaves us with the small arms:

0276_3_Snip_NY_IND2

By battery reporting:

  • 13th Battery: Seven army revolvers, seven navy revolvers and ten (?) horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Fifteen navy revolvers and five cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Twenty army revolvers and twenty-two horse artillery sabers.
  • 18th Battery: Four .58-caliber Springfield rifled muskets, three army revolvers, thirteen cavalry sabers, and seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Seventeen navy revolvers, one cavalry saber, and twenty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • 21st Battery: Seventeen army revolvers and sixteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: Sixty army revolvers and seventy-five cavalry sabers.
  • 24th Battery: Fifty-three army revolvers.

We’ll complete the New York independent batteries, and the states’ listings for the third quarter as a whole, in the next installment.

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 3

Continuing with the second quarter, 1863 summaries, we turn at last to the “high dozen” of the New York independent batteries.   The quarterly summary contained lines for batteries up to the 32nd:

0209_1_Snip_NY_IND_Pt3

But to provide a complete assessment, we’ll discuss up to the 36th in the administrative section for an even dozen.  To facilitate that discussion, we will break those dozen into three groups.  The first of those, the 25th, 26th, 27th, and 28th Batteries had returns listed in the summaries:

  • 25th Battery: Reporting at New Orleans, Louisiana with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain John A. Grow remained in command. Recall this battery, and the 26th, below, had suffered shipwrecks when transiting from New York to Louisiana.  The 25th remained part of the garrison of New Orleans, in the Nineteenth Corps’ rear area.  In late June, the battery was among forces dispatched to deal with a Confederate force aiming to disrupt supply lines.  The battery received differing assessments for performance at LaFourche Crossing, June 20-21.  Of interest, Grow reported having charge, in addition to his four rifles, of a 18-pdr gun, two 12-pdr howitzers, and one 6-pdr.  All of those pieces, according to Grow, were spiked, disabled, and thrown in the bayou owing to a hasty withdrawal.
  • 26th Battery: Also at New Orleans, but with four 12-pdr Napoleons.   Captain George W. Fox’s battery was part of the garrison of that city.
  • 27th Battery: At Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain John B. Eaton commanded this battery.  In mid-July, the battery transferred to the Department of the Susquehanna.
  • 28th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with “infantry stores.”  The battery served at Fort Schuyler and Sandy Hook.  Captain Cyprian H. Millard was dismissed on June 15, 1863.  Captain Josiah C. Hannum then took command.

 

The next four batteries, the 29th, 30th, 31st, and 32nd, were originally batteries of the 1st New York Light Battalion.  These were Battery A, B, C, and D, respectively.  According to the tables of organization, all four batteries were part of the Army of the Potomac’s Artillery Reserve (2nd Volunteer Brigade) at the start of June.  But hard service took a toll on these batteries and many enlistments were due up.   On June 25, Special Orders No. 173 assigned the 30th and 32nd by name to Camp Barry.  And I believe the other two batteries were also reassigned around the same time.  Only one of these has a return for the quarter:

  • 29th Battery: No return. At the end of 1862 the battery had four 20-pdr Parrotts.  But by the end of June, the battery was run down.  Captain Otto Diedrich remained commander, but many of the men were detailed to the 32nd Battery.
  • 30th Battery: No return.  Also a battery previously armed with four 20-pdr Parrotts.  Captain Adolph Voegelee commanded.   The battery would later serve with the Eighth Corps at Harpers Ferry, towards the end of July.
  • 31st Battery: No return.  Captain Gustav Von Blucher took command of this battery during the winter. But as it was reduced, the men were attached to other batteries.
  • 32nd Battery: At Maryland Heights, Maryland with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Kusserow resumed command in May.  By the end of July, the battery was with the Eighth Corps’ Maryland Heights Division.

The last four batteries of this set, 33nd, 34th, 35th, and 36th, do not appear on the Ordnance Department’s accounting.  But these did exist, in some form or another, during the time frame we are discussing:

  • 33rd Battery:  Authorized on July 9, 1863, the battery did not leave the state until September 5.  Captain Algar M. Wheeler was in command.
  • 34th Battery: This number was reserved for Battery L, 2nd New York Artillery.
  • 35th Battery: Also authorized on July 9.  Captain James B. Caryle was in command. But the 35th was never completely formed.  What men were recruited were allocated to Battery A, 16th New York Heavy Artillery.
  • 36th Battery:  Authorized on August 11, 1863, Captain Charles Graham Bacon was named commander. But the battery never completed formation. Instead, men were transferred to the 13th New York Heavy Artillery.

So of twelve batteries we’ve considered, only five posted returns.  And only four of those had field artillery assigned.

Only two of those batteries had smoothbores:

0211_1_Snip_NY_IND_Pt3

  • 26th Battery: 148 shot, 12 shell, 48 case, and 12 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 27th Battery: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Two batteries with 3-inch rifles.  So that means some Hotchkiss projectiles were on hand:

0211_2_Snip_NY_IND_Pt3

  • 25th Battery: 148 canister, 80(?) percussion shell, 290 fuse shell, and 326 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 32nd Battery: 120 canister and 497 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

No Dyers, James, Parrott projectiles reported by any battery.  And just one entry for Schenkl:

0212_2_Snip_NY_IND_Pt3

  • 32nd Battery: 583 shells for 3-inch rifles.

Turning last to the small arms:

0212_3_Snip_NY_IND_Pt3

By Battery:

  • 25th Battery: Eighteen Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 26th Battery: Twenty Army revolvers.
  • 27th Battery: Seventeen Army revolvers, thirty cavalry sabers, and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 32nd Battery: Nine Army revolvers, thirty-six cavalry sabers, and fifteen foot artillery swords.

I’d intended to throw in the three lines covering miscellaneous detachments with this last set of independent batteries.  But upon full reflection, I feel those warrant a more detailed look.  Those three, along with a separate battery which escaped notice, are for the next installment.

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 2

For the first dozen of the New York independent batteries, discussed last week, we found all active batteries within the eastern theater.  Many were involved with the Gettysburg Campaign, directly or indirectly.  But looking to the second batch – 13th to the 24th Batteries – we find the service of that batch was much more varied:

0209_1_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

Of the twelve, only eight had returns for the quarter.  Only one of those was posted to Washington before the end of July.  Three arrived in August.  Another in September.  And the last two were not filed until 1864.  An administrative “stretch” of the data.

 

  • 13th Independent Battery: Reported, on August 7, 1863, at Warrenton Junction, Virginia with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles (down from six the previous quarter).  With reorganization after Chancellorsville, moved up to the Artillery Brigade, Eleventh Corps.  Captain  Julius Dieckmann resigned on May 15.  He was replaced by Lieutenant William Wheeler.  As of June 30, the battery was at Emmitsburg, Maryland.  The battery lost one gun on the field at Gettysburg, when the axle split. Despite efforts to drag the tube off the field, lashed to a limber by a prolong, the gun was left on the field.  However, that gun was recovered on July 5 and brought back to service.  The battery expended 850 rounds during the battle, but were “anxious for another opportunity to try their 3-inch guns.”
  • 14th Independent Battery: No return.  Earlier in the spring of 1862, personnel of this battery were distributed to other batteries.  As of June 1863, the first section  was assigned to Battery B, 1st New York; second and third sections to Battery G, 1st New York.  At Gettysburg, Captain James McKay Rorty, of the battery, commanded Battery B, 1st New York Light Artillery. But he was mortally wounded on July 3.  The battery was formally disbanded in September 1863.
  • 15th Battery:  As of the August 15 report, was at Rappahannock Station, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery was assigned to First Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, under Captain Patrick Hart.  In May, the battery had turned in their 3-inch rifles for the Napoleons.  At the end of June, the battery was, with the rest of McGilvery’s Brigade, in Maryland, with an appointment two days later at the Peach Orchard of Gettysburg.
  • 16th Battery: No return. Captain Frederick L. Hiller’s battery transferred to the Seventh Corps in April, and stationed at Newport News, Virginia. In the previous quarter, the battery reported six 10-pdr Parrott Rifles.
  • 17th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain George T. Anthony’s battery was assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction.
  • 18th Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with six 20-pdr Parrotts.  The report was not received in Washington until August 1864.  The battery transferred from Second Division to First Division, Nineteenth Corps in May.  Captain Albert G. Mack retained command. The battery participated in the siege of Port Hudson.
  • 19th Battery: No return. The battery, under Captain William H. Stahl, transferred to First Division, Seventh Corps in April.  The battery saw action in the siege of Suffolk.  In the previous quarter, the battery reported six 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with “infantry stores” only.  Captain  B. Franklin Ryer’s battery served as garrison artillery.  The battery would be involved with the suppression of the New York riots in July.
  • 21st Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with four 3-inch steel guns (make and model unspecified). The report is from February 1864, but accurate.  This battery, under Captain James Barnes, was assigned to Second Division, Nineteenth Corps.
  • 22nd Battery: No return. Earlier in February the battery became Company M, 9th New York Heavy Artillery.  The designation remained on the clerk’s report as a placeholder.
  • 23rd Battery: Washington, North Carolina with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Originally, Battery A of the New York Rocket Battalion. Captain Alfred Ransom was in charge of this battery, assigned to the Eighteenth Corps, Department of North Carolina.
  • 24th Battery: At Plymouth, North Carolina with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Likewise, Battery B of the Rocket Battalion with this new designation taking effect in February.  This battery was also assigned to the Eighteenth Corps.  Captain Jay E. Lee resigned in mid-June.  Lieutenant A. Lester Cady was promoted and assigned command.

 

As I said, varied service – from New York harbor to Port Hudson on the Mississippi.

Turning to the ammunition, we have the smoothbore rounds accounted for:

0211_1_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

Three batteries reporting:

  • 15th Battery: 128 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 288 shot, 69 shell, 388 (?) case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 24th Battery: 393 shot, 230 shell, 464 case, and 368 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

A straightforward, expected tally.

For the rifled projectiles, the Hotchiss columns are also straightforward:

0211_2_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

Three batteries with 3-inch rifles and one with 20-pdr Parrotts:

  • 13th Battery: 70 canister, 150 fuse shell, and 430 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 95 fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles (20-pdr Parrott).
  • 21st Battery: 310 canister and 473 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 191 canister, 68 percussion shell, 281 fuse shell, and 552 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

For the following page, we’ll break this down into two sections.  First a lone entry for Dyer’s patent:

0212_1A_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

  • 23rd Battery: 30 (?) Dyer’s shell for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the Parrott and Schenkl projectiles:

0212_1B_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

Just one battery with those big 20-pdr Parrotts:

  • 18th Battery: 786 shell, 168 case, and 137 canister, Parrott patent; 439 Schenkl shot, also for 20-pdrs.

More Schenkl on the next page:

0212_2_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

  • 13th Battery: 80 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 40 shell for 20-pdr Parrotts.
  • 21st Battery: 47 shell for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly, we have the small arms to account for:

0212_3_Snip_NY_IND_Pt2

By battery:

  • 13th Battery: Seven Army revolvers, seven Navy revolvers, and fifteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Seventeen Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Twenty Army revolvers and twenty-two horse artillery sabers.
  • 18th Battery: Four Springfield muskets (.58 caliber), three army revolves, and seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 21st Battery: Eighteen Army revolvers and sixteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: Sixty Army revolvers and seventy-five cavalry sabers.
  • 24th Battery: Fifty-three Army revolvers.

We will find this pattern of varied service repeated in the last portion of independent batteries. We will look at batteries 25 to 32 in the next installment.  Along with three “detachment” lines.