“No quarter will be shown to the negro troops whatever”: Confederate threat to Columbus, KY

In the spring of 1864, Colonel William H. Lawrence commanded a garrison at Columbus, Kentucky built around eight companies of Lawrence’s 34th New Jersey Infantry. Like many other similar posts in west Tennessee and Kentucky, the garrison’s duties were relatively quiet compared to the front lines of the war.  While earlier in the war, ColumbusContinue reading ““No quarter will be shown to the negro troops whatever”: Confederate threat to Columbus, KY”

“If you persist in defense, you must take the consequences”: The battle of the Sevenths at Union City

Mention the 7th Tennessee Cavalry and you must provide a qualifier – “Union” or “Confederate.” While this is not unique to that particular regiment, with several numbered Tennessee union regiments of infantry and cavalry on the records, what does set those “Sevenths” apart from the others is what happened on March 24, 1864.  On thatContinue reading ““If you persist in defense, you must take the consequences”: The battle of the Sevenths at Union City”

Bottom of the Barrel, Part 3: Confederate 13-inch Mortars

Another example of Confederate use of old ordnance comes from the service files of William Richardson Hunt: The document accounts for the issue of a 13-inch mortar, mortar bed, 12 shells, and 250 fuse plugs in April 1862 for use at Fort Pillow. Hunt sent the mortar to Captain Hugh T. Scott, ordnance officer atContinue reading “Bottom of the Barrel, Part 3: Confederate 13-inch Mortars”