A demonstration “to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad”: Plans leading to Honey Hill

Give or take a day, 150 years ago at this time Major-General John Foster received a letter sent on November 13, 1864 by Major-General Henry Halleck in Washington.  For the most part, the letter told Foster what he already knew: Major-General Sherman expects to leave Atlanta on the 16th instant for the interior of GeorgiaContinue reading “A demonstration “to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad”: Plans leading to Honey Hill”

“I desire to call your attention to the following points”: Foster’s instructions to Scammon, October 1864

When he first took command of the Department of the South in the spring of 1864, Major-General John Foster inherited the veteran Brigadier-General Alexander Schimmelfennig in command of Federal forces on Folly and Morris Islands – officially the Northern District, but the Charleston Front, if I may.  When Schimmelfenning departed on leave, for health reasons,Continue reading ““I desire to call your attention to the following points”: Foster’s instructions to Scammon, October 1864″

“They seem the most worthless and unreliable fellows in their whole lot”: The 600 prisoners on Morris Island

On October 4, 1864, Major-General John Foster provided a routine report to Army Headquarters in Washington, describing events in the Department of the South, but focused on affairs at Charleston, South Carolina.  He began describing continued “skirmishing” with the heavy artillery: I have the honor to report that nothing of importance has occurred in thisContinue reading ““They seem the most worthless and unreliable fellows in their whole lot”: The 600 prisoners on Morris Island”