January 2, 1865, “Time is a very important consideration…”: Supplies rushed forward for Sherman’s next move

At this time in 1865, the Federal armies in Savannah were like a coiled spring, waiting for the trigger to surge forward again.  On Christmas Eve, Major-General William T. Sherman wrote to Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant suggesting a move through South Carolina.  Sherman preferred to leave Charleston and Augusta (Georgia) alone while he drove through theContinue reading “January 2, 1865, “Time is a very important consideration…”: Supplies rushed forward for Sherman’s next move”

Savannah’s Siege, December 20, 1864: “The noise of the retreating enemy could plainly be heard”

For Lieutenant-General William Hardee, December 20, 1864 was a day of anticipation.  Had the pontoon bridge across the Savannah River been ready before dusk the day before, he would have started the evacuation of Savannah.  Instead, he looked to keep up the appearances of holding the city for just one more day and then evacuateContinue reading “Savannah’s Siege, December 20, 1864: “The noise of the retreating enemy could plainly be heard””

“The railroad is less than three-quarters of a mile from our front”: Foster’s attempt to isolate Savannah

With his forces stopped at Honey Hill on November 30, 1864, Major-General John Foster turned to other courses in order to accomplished his supporting task for Major-General William T. Sherman – that of attaining the Charleston & Savannah Railroad.  On December 6, Foster landed a force under Brigadier-General Edward Potter at Gregory’s Plantation.  The intentContinue reading ““The railroad is less than three-quarters of a mile from our front”: Foster’s attempt to isolate Savannah”