Origins of the Rodman – Early Experiments in the Rodman Method, Part 5

Other than perhaps the phenomenal descriptions of bursting guns flinging metal into the heavens, Thomas J. Rodman’s experiments were dry scientific procedures.  Rodman and other ordnance officers focused on gathering data to reduce the unknowns.  The experiments of 1849, 1851, 1856, and 1857 all built up to a conclusion from the experiments conducted at PittsburghContinue reading “Origins of the Rodman – Early Experiments in the Rodman Method, Part 5”

Origins of the Rodman – Early Experiments in the Rodman Method, Part 3

As seen in earlier posts, William Wade of the Fort Pitt Foundry conducted experiments in 1849 and 1851 to proof the system proposed by Lieutenant Thomas J. Rodman.  While providing promising results, the tests did not provide conclusive proof that hollow-core, water-cooled casting produced the quality guns needed by the Army (and the Navy). IndeedContinue reading “Origins of the Rodman – Early Experiments in the Rodman Method, Part 3”

How do you elevate an seven-ton columbiad?

So you have one of those 15,000 pound 10-inch columbiads or 9,000 pound 8-inch columbiads mounted (which was no small feat to begin with).  The enemy fleet is threatening to sail up the channel.  How the heck to you point that big gun on the target? The Bellona 8-inch Columbiad at Fort Darling is aContinue reading “How do you elevate an seven-ton columbiad?”