Marching Through Georgia, November 21, 1864: Bad weather, mistakes, but good foraging

One old folk saying goes to the effect “storms of November come together.”* Before leaving Atlanta in mid-November, Major-General William T. Sherman spoke of waiting for rains to pass, as if he accepted that sage wisdom.  For what it is worth, maybe the Farmer’s Almanac was correct… but there were two bunches of storms thatContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, November 21, 1864: Bad weather, mistakes, but good foraging”

Marching through Georgia, November 20, 1864: Rain, Mud, slow marching and raiding on Macon

On November 20, 1864, it was General Mud who came to the aid of Georgia’s defense. Rains turned the roads into muddy traces.  All along Major-General William T. Sherman’s line of march, the formations moved slowly. Dawn broke to offer a foggy, rainy morning.  That morning, the last division of the Fifteenth Corps, belonging toContinue reading “Marching through Georgia, November 20, 1864: Rain, Mud, slow marching and raiding on Macon”

Marching Through Georgia, November 19, 1864: “The light was so bright that it reflected… the crossing columns of troops”

November 19, 1864 was a critical day for Maj0r-General William T. Sherman and his March to the Sea.  The Left Wing of his force was past the Ocmulgee River crossings.  But his Right Wing, under Major-General O.O. Howard was delayed in crossing at Planters’ Factory.  The plan of the march depended upon rapid movements.  ButContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, November 19, 1864: “The light was so bright that it reflected… the crossing columns of troops””