Potter’s Raid, April 17, 1865: “They broke and fled in disorder… we marched into Camden”

After a two day march to bypass Confederate defenses along the Camden Branch Railroad, Brigadier-General Edward E. Potter directed his division on to Camden, South Carolina on April 17, 1865.  Colonel Philip P. Brown’s First Brigade had the honor of leading the march that day.   And on point was, again, Lieutenant-Colonel Nathaniel Haughton and theContinue reading “Potter’s Raid, April 17, 1865: “They broke and fled in disorder… we marched into Camden””

Potter’s Raid, April 15-16, 1865: “Charge Bayonet!” as Potter out-maneuvers the Confederates

By destroying locomotives and railroad facilities at Manchester, South Carolina on April 11, 1865, Brigadier-General Edward Potter accomplished a significant portion of his assigned tasks. But Potter learned the Confederates held additional locomotives and rolling stock up the railroad spur line to Camden.  To complete his mission, Potter needed to bag those trains. But sinceContinue reading “Potter’s Raid, April 15-16, 1865: “Charge Bayonet!” as Potter out-maneuvers the Confederates”

Sherman’s March, February 24, 1865: “The rain and bad roads had prevented the complete accomplishment of each order of march”

On February 24, 1865, General Mud came to the aid of the Confederacy.  What had been a relatively incident free crossing of the Wateree-Catawba Rivers became the most difficult maneuver of Major-General William T. Sherman’s march through South Carolina. Major-General Oliver O. Howard summarized the difficulty for the Right Wing that day: Before General BlairContinue reading “Sherman’s March, February 24, 1865: “The rain and bad roads had prevented the complete accomplishment of each order of march””