Summary Statement, 4th Quarter, 1863 – Massachusetts

As was the case with summaries from the previous quarters, the clerks at the Ordnance Department “shorted” Massachusetts in the battery listings. There were, eventually, sixteen batteries from the Bay State. And for the fourth quarter, we see a couple of omissions:

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  • 1st Battery: At Brandy Station, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. The battery remained with the Artillery Brigade, Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Captain William H. McCartney remained in command.  The battery saw action near the Saunders’ House during the battle of Mine Run, firing fifteen rounds.
  • 2nd Battery: No return. Captain Ormand F. Nims remained in command of this battery. Part of the Nineteenth Corps, Department of the Gulf, the battery transferred from the corps artillery reserve to the Cavalry Division. Around this time the battery exchanged six 6-pdr rifled field guns for a like number of 12-pdr Napoleons. The battery saw field service in the Teche Campaign in October and November. Moving from Brashear City, the cavalry column to which the battery was attached reached Opelousas on October 21, having skirmished frequently with Confederates along the way. A section under Lieutenant William Marland saw action at Carrion Crow Bayou and Grand Couteau (November 2 and 3, respectively). In the latter action, Marland found his battery surrounded and without support. He ordered the section limbered up and charged through to save the guns. The battery arrived at New Iberia on November 17 and remained there until January.
  • 3rd Battery: Reporting at Bealton, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Assigned to the Artillery Brigade, Fifth Corps, with Lieutenant Aaron F. Walcott in charge of the battery.  Captain Augustus P. Martin, of the battery, comanded the corps artillery brigade. Participating with the corps through the Bristoe Campaign and Mine Run, the battery went into winter quarters outside Brandy Station, off the north end of Fleetwood Hill.
  • 4th Battery: Reporting New Iberia, Louisiana with two 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch ordnance rifles.  Captain George G. Trull commanded. However, in Trull’s absence Lieutenant George W. Taylor led the battery in December 1863. The battery participated in the Teche Expedition in October. They were in action at Vermillion Bayou on November 11, without loss. The battery transferred from Third Division to First Division, Nineteenth Corps later in November.  
  • 5th Battery: Reporting at Rappahannock [Station], Virginia with six 3-inch rifles.  Captain Charles A. Phillips remained in command, and the battery assigned to the Fifth Corps.  The battery participated in the Bristoe and Mine Run Campaigns. Following those, the battery, alongside the 3rd Battery, went into winter quarters at Brandy Station.
  • 6th Battery: At New Iberia, Louisiana with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 12-pdr field howitzers. The battery was assigned to First Division, Nineteenth Corps.  When Captain William W. Carruth mustered out on October 3rd, Lieutenant Edward K. Russell (2nd Battery, above) transferred to command.  Then on December 9, Lieutenant John F. Phelps, of the battery, took command.  Phelps would be promoted to Captain with commission back dated to October 3. The battery participated in the Teche Campaign of that fall, arriving at New Iberia on November 16 and going into winter quarters.
  • 7th Battery: At Camp Barry, D.C., with six 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  Captain Phineas A. Davis resigned at the start of October to receive a promotion.  In his place Lieutenant Newman W. Storer received the captaincy. This much traveled battery was not resting long at Camp Barry. In January, they embarked on a steamer for New Orleans and a transfer to the Nineteenth Corps.
  • 8th Battery: No return.  Mustered out in November 1862 at the end of a six-month enlistment.
  • 9th Battery: At Brandy Station, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons. Remaining with the First Volunteer Artillery Brigade, Artillery Reserve. Captain John Bigelow commanded, but was recovering from wounds.  Lieutenant Richard S. Milton filled in his place.
  • 10th Battery:  Also at Brandy Station, Virginia but with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain J. Henry Sleeper commanded this battery, assigned to Third Corps, Army of the Potomac. The battery was active in the field for both the Bristoe Station and Mine Run Campaigns.
  • 11th Battery: No return.  This battery mustered out of service in May 1863. However, it remained as a militia battery (and was called out to suppress riots in Boston in July).  On December 1, Captain Edward J. Jones, commanding the battery, received authorization to recruit up to full strength and prepare the battery for muster back into service. That re-muster occurred on January 2, 1864. Along the way, the battery received six new 3-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery:  At Port Hudson, Louisiana, with five 6-pdr field guns and one 12-pdr field howitzer. Captain Jacob Miller remained in command. On October 15 the battery transferred from the New Orleans garrison to that of Port Hudson.
  • 13th Battery: Not listed. The 13th Battery was down to around fifty effective men by the fall of 1863.  Having transferred their guns and horses to fill out other batteries earlier in the year, the battery served as a detachment under the 2nd Battery (see above). At this time of the war, Captain Charles H. J. Hamlin was on recruiting duty.  In his place, Lieutenant Ellis L. Motte led the detachment.
  • 14th Battery: Not listed.  Philip H. Tyler, formerly a lieutenant in the 3rd Battery, received authorization to recruit this battery in December 1863. But his efforts failed and the authority was receded. In January, Joseph W.B. Wright, formerly of 1st Battery (original three month muster) and the 1st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, received authorization to begin recruiting. Wright’s efforts bore fruit with a February 1864 muster.
  • 15th Battery: At Lakeport, Louisiana with two 6-pdr field guns.  Captain Timothy Pearson saw most of his battery equipment and horses transferred to other units in the spring of 1863.  The men served at the forts protecting the road and railroad to Lake Ponchatrain. During that duty, they received two guns, horses, and necessary equipment. On December 29, the battery moved to Lakeport. Then on January 2nd, the battery embarked on the steamer Kate Dale for six weeks’ duty on Lake Ponchatrain. Of note, official accounts of that expedition indicate the 15th Battery mounted FOUR guns on the steamer (Lieutenant Albert Rouse in command of the detachment). Furthermore, later in the year the battery reported two 6-pdrs and four 12-pdr Napoleons on hand. Such leads to speculations.
  • 16th Battery: Not listed.  Battery did not begin recruiting until January-February 1864.

Thus we see three main themes with the Massachusetts batteries – chasing Lee in Virginia, serving in steamy Louisiana, and recruiting up for muster. Three of those activities required ammunition. And ammunition was reported. We start with the smoothbore:

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  • 1st Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, and 288 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 3rd Battery: 192 shot, 96 shell, and 387 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 4th Battery: 24 shot, 150 shell, and 47 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 6th Battery: 57 shot, 179 shell, and 251 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 9th Battery: 180 shot, 64 shell, and 192 case for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 12th Battery: 107 shot and 147 case for 6-pdr field guns; 59 shell and 42 case for 12-pdr field howitzers.
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  • 1st Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 3rd Battery: 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 4th Battery: 35 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 6th Battery: 63 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 9th Battery: 54 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 12th Battery: 285 canister for 6-pdr field guns and 19 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

To the right we start the rifled projectiles, with the Hotchkiss leading off:

  • 4th Battery: 84 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery: 120 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 189 time fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

Continuing with more Hotchkiss:

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  • 4th Battery: 281 percussion fuse shell and 39 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 5th Battery: 97 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery: 236 percussion fuse shell and 120 canister for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 98 percussion fuse shell, 341 case shot, and 115 canister for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page is an interesting entry for Parrott projectiles:

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  • 5th Battery: 41 Parrott canister for 3-inch bore rifles.

This deserves some consideration. Note the header has different columns for 10-pdr/2.9-inch and 10-pdr/3-inch Parrott. Clearly this is the latter. Could one fire a 3-inch Parrott projectile from a 3-inch Ordnance Rifle? Technically, I see no reason why not. If it fits down the bore, it will fire back out, right? But the poor 5th Battery had two types of canister on hand and no explosive projectiles! We see that was resolved in the Schenkl columns to the right:

  • 5th Battery: 140 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 41 shell for 3-inch rifles.

And more Schenkl on the page that followed:

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  • 5th Battery: 904 case shot for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery: 720 case shot for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 256 case shot for 3-inch rifles.

Moving to the small arms reported:

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  • 1st Battery: Eight Colt army revolvers, nine cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • 3rd Battery: One Colt army revolver, eight cavalry sabers, and twenty horse artillery sabers.
  • 4th Battery: Seven Colt army revolvers and twenty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • 5th Battery: One Colt army revolver and twenty-seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 6th Battery: Seventeen Colt army revolvers and twenty-six cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery: Twenty Colt army revolvers and forty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • 9th Battery: Eight Colt army revolvers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Sixteen Colt navy revolvers and nineteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 12th Battery: Eighteen Colt army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Fifty Springfield .58 caliber muskets, fourteen Colt navy revolvers, eight cavalry sabers, and fifty-nine horse artillery sabers.

Let’s talk cartridge bags:

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  • 5th Battery: 1,185 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 1,234 cartridge bags for 3-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery: 162 cartridge bags for smoothbore field pieces.

And far to the right we see the 15th Battery records ammunition for it’s muskets:

  • 15th Battery: 100 cartridges for .58 caliber muskets. Two rounds per rifle? What’s up with that?

On the last page we review, there are many tallies to record. So keep up:

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  • 1st Battery: 104 cartridges for army revolvers and 2,844 friction primers;
  • 3rd Battery: 2,100 friction primers.
  • 4th Battery: 235 paper fuses; 2,500 friction primers; 50 yards of slow match; and 65 portfires.
  • 5th Battery: 1,847 friction primers and 50 yards of slow match.
  • 6th Battery: 2,440 friction primers.
  • 7th Battery: 600 cartridges for navy revolvers; 1,400 paper fuses; and 850 friction primers.
  • 9th Battery: 500 cartridges for army revolvers; 186 friction primers; and 50 yards of slow match.
  • 10th Battery: 753 paper fuses and 1,796 friction primers.
  • 12th Battery: 1,400 cartridges for army revolvers.
  • 15th Battery: 788 cartridges for navy revolvers; 1,524 friction primers; 2 yards of slow match; 1,400 percussion caps for pistols; and 20 portfires.

I’m often wondering how to reconcile the reported number of guns to projectiles, and thence out to the primers and fuses on hand. More so with regard to cartridges and percussion caps for small arms. To some extent, we have to consider this was the quantity deemed “reportable, on hand” as opposed to what actually might have been laying about. Nuanced, there is a difference. Particularly with the small arms. And I’d also say that applied to things like fuses and friction primers. Then again, there is a reason batteries were issued things like portfires and slow match.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 4th Regiment, US Regulars

In the third quarter, 1863 summaries, the ordnance clerks allocated thirteen lines for the Fourth US Artillery.  Of those lines, a full twelve were based on received returns.  Battery E had no recorded return.  Of the twelve recorded lines, all but three were marked received during the fall months of that year.  Three were not received until January of 1864.  Thus, we have a relatively complete set of records to discuss.

Yes, I did say thirteen lines.  But the regiment was authorized twelve batteries.  Ah, but the regimental adjutant was given a line:

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Looking at each battery in turn, there are several changes to discuss with the administrative details and cannon assigned:

  • Battery A: Reporting, on October 28, at Gainesville, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons. Following the death of Lieutenant Alonzo Cushing at Gettysburg, several different officers, and one non-commissioned officer, led the battery… some for just the briefest of battlefield moments.  For brevity, I’ll cite Lieutenant Horatio B. Reed in command of the battery for the Bristoe Campaign.  Two other significant changes took place after Gettysburg.  The battery replaced its 3-inch Rifles with Napoleons.  Further, in the weeks after Gettysburg the battery transferred to the First Brigade, Horse Artillery.
  • Battery B: “In the field” with six 12-pdr Napoleons. The very capable Lieutenant James Stewart remained in command of this battery.  And the battery remained in Colonel Charles Wainwright’s brigade, of the First Corps.  So their “in the field” location for September 30 was Culpeper County.
  • Battery C:  Reporting at Washington, D.C (with a date of January 22, 1864) with four 12-pdr Napoleons. The location raises questions, as the battery remained with the Regular Brigade, Artillery Reserve.  With Lieutenant Evan Thomas reassigned to staff duties, Lieutenant Charles L. Fitzhugh held command.
  • Battery D: Reporting at Portsmouth, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.    Captain Frederick M. Follett’s battery supported Seventh Corps.
  • Battery E: No report.  Lieutenant  Samuel S. Elder’s was in the First Brigade, Horse Artillery assigned to the Cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles assigned.  We can thus place this battery “in the field” and on duty along the Rapidan during those days before the Bristoe campaign.
  • Battery F: Reporting, on December 1, at Stevenson, Alabama with six 12-pdr Napoleons. This veteran battery moved with the Twelfth Corps from Virginia to reinforce Chattanooga, in the aftermath of Chickamauga.  Lieutenant Edward D. Muhlenberg, having been replaced in his role as Corps Artillery Chief, resumed battery command.
  • Battery G: I like this line –  Reporting on November 19 at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Lieutenant Eugene A. Bancroft remained in command.  Battery G supported the Eleventh Corps.  As with Battery F, above, they were sent to Tennessee as reinforcements.  If we interpret the reporting date literally, we can place the battery below Lookout Mountain.  The battery would support an assault on the mountain five days later.
  • Battery H: At Chattanooga, Tennessee with three 12-pdr field howitzers. Lieutenant Harry C. Cushing’s battery lost a howitzer and many horses at Chickamuaga.  And they expended a lot of ammunition.  Battery assigned to Second Division, Twenty-First Corps.
  • Battery I: Also at Chattanooga, this battery reported four 12-pdr Napoleons. Lieutenant Frank G. Smith commanded this battery, supporting Third Division, Fourteenth Corps.  Smith reported leaving the field at Chickamauga, on September 20, with only six rounds.
  • Battery K: Reporting at Culpeper, Virginia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. The battery remained with Third Corps.  Badly wounded at Gettysburg, Lieutenant Francis W. Seeley was recuperating.  In his place, Lieutenant Robert James held command.
  • Battery L: At Portsmouth, Virginia, with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Under command of Captain Robert V. W. Howard, and assigned to First Division, Seventh Corps, in Southeast Virginia. .
  • Battery M: At Chattanoooga, Tennessee reporting four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 24-pdr field howitzers.  Lieutenant Francis L. D. Russell remained in command and the battery remained with Second Division, Twenty-First Corps.  In his report for Chickamauga, Russell noted his losses were “…2 men killed, 6 wounded, 14 horses killed and wounded, and 3 caissons abandoned.”
  • Adjutant: Reporting at Fort Washington, Maryland.  Of course with no artillery, but we will see an accounting of other arms and equipment.

We don’t often consider the service details of the regular’s regimental headquarters, as those rarely figured into the field formations.  However, with the adjutant mentioned, let us consider the duty of the 4th US Headquarters and Staff.  At this time of the war, they were assigned to the Defenses of Washington.  Colonel Charles S. Merchant, having served more than 45 years at that time, retired from active service.  Colonel Horace Brooks, West Point class of 35 and with 28 years of service, took command.

Moving from the administration, we turn to the reported ammunition for the regiment.  Starting with the smoothbore types:

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And there was a lot to report:

  • Battery A: 160 shot, 64 shell, 176 case, and 112 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery B: 192 shot, 192 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery C: 97 shot, 51 shell, 256 case, and 108 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery F: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery H: 221 shell, 234 case, and 116 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery I: 161 shot, 42 shell, 154 case, and 66 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery K: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L: 96 shot, 32 shell, 96 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery M: 10 case for 12-pdr Napoleons; 54 shell, 48 case, and 30 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.

The uniform quantities reported by Batteries F, G, and K seem too perfect.  Almost as if, perhaps, the officers simply estimated what they should have on hand, by regulation.  But that’s just my speculation.

Quantities for Batteries H, I, and M (particularly the latter) seem to reflect expenditures in battle at Chickamauga.

We have but one 3-inch battery to consider, and thus not a lot on the Hotchkiss page:

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Just Battery D:

  • Battery D: 15 canister, 342 fuse shell, and 330(?) bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

We will break down the next page by section for clarity.  First the Dyer’s patent columns:

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Again D Battery:

  • Battery D: 68 Dyer’s canister for 3-inch rifles.

One battery reported Parrotts:

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Battery L, down at Portsmouth:

  • Battery L: 484 shell, 250 case, and 96 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

Turning to the Schenkl projectiles:

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Battery D completed its assortment of types:

  • Battery D: 100 shell and 155 case for 3-inch rifles.

That brings us to the small arms:

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By battery:

  • Battery A: Eighteen Army revolvers and eighteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Twenty-one Navy revolvers and nine cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: Thirteen Navy revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D: Nine Army revolvers, 135 horse artillery sabers, and one foot artillery saber.
  • Battery F: Thirteen Army revolvers, nineteen horse artillery sabers, and one foot artillery saber.
  • Battery G: Three Army revolvers, four Navy revolvers, and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Sixteen Army revolvers and fifteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Two Army revolvers and twenty-nine cavalry sabers.
  • Battery K: Twelve Army revolvers, one Navy revolver, one cavalry saber, and nineteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Fourteen Army revolvers and 116 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Eight Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Regimental Adjutant: Three Army revolvers and twenty-nine horse artillery sabers.

The adjutant also reported thirty-one sword belts and plates.  And once again, all government property was accounted for!

 

150 Years Ago: One last fight on Fleetwood Hill for John Buford

Having extracted themselves from a dangerous position on the Rapidan River and then covered the withdrawal of the Army of the Potomac over the Rappahannock, Brigadier-General John Buford’s First Cavalry Division was worse for the wear. But on campaign, the cavalry rarely rest.  At 10:30 A.M. on October 12, 1863, Buford received these orders:

Major-General Sedgwick will, in addition to his own corps, take command of the Fifth Corps and Buford’s division of cavalry, and advance immediately to Brandy Station and take position at the heights there, driving the enemy and holding the position. He will report his progress to the commanding general, and also the force, position, and movements of the enemy.

General George Meade needed to know if the Confederates remained in strength across the Rappahannock in Culpeper County.  A reconnaissance in force could shake out that information.

By noon, Buford had his division across the Rappahannock:

After advancing about 2 miles, the enemy’s pickets were driven in, and the advance commenced skirmishing with the enemy. Finding his force insignificant, a general advance was ordered, and he was driven to within 1 ½ miles of Culpeper. The object of the expedition being accomplished, the division returned and bivouacked on the left of the infantry near Brandy.

The Federals only encountered Colonel Thomas Rosser’s 5th Virginia Cavalry.

But Buford focused attention to other matters than simply chasing Confederates:

Every man of the command seemed gratified at having again passed over their old fighting ground, because they were enabled to recover the bodies of some of their comrades who had fallen the day before, and to administer to and remove several wounded men who had been neglected and who would undoubtedly have perished but for their timely assistance. It was truly gratifying to be able to recover these wounded men, and to bury the men that had been stripped and abandoned by the enemy.

That evening, the infantry moved back across the Rappahannock first starting around midnight.  Before dawn had a chance to break on October 13, Buford’s men were across bringing up the rear.  The division’s next assignment was covering the Army’s trains during the march back to Centreville.

Of note, the actions on October 11-12, 1863 were the last major fights over Fleetwood Hill.  They were also the last major fighting (though not the last skirmish) in which John Buford commanded troops.  Buford had but two months more to live.

We think of Fleetwood Hill, and June 9 comes to mind.  Well those October fights are also a reason this hill was made sacred by the blood of those who fought. The same can be said for the August 20, 1862 fighting. I run out of fingers counting other engagements fought on and around that rise of ground.  Fleetwood Hill was among the most important geographical features contested during the Civil War.  That’s why we should celebrate victory in the LAST contest over Fleetwood – which lead to its purchase and preservation. If some people had been given their way, Fleetwood Hill would be a racetrack entrance, part of an office complex, or…. lake front property.

(Citations from Buford’s report of the Bristoe Campaign, OR, Series I, Volume 29, Part I, Serial 48, page 349.)

Bristoe Station 150th Events

I’ve read someplace that the soldiers didn’t consider the Gettysburg Campaign complete until after one more go around in Virginia. If that is true, then Bristoe Station marked the end of the Gettysburg Campaign, as it were. Looking ahead to that sesquicentennial, Prince William County’s Historic Preservation Division has posted schedule of events covering this often overlooked “second round” of campaigning during the late summer and early fall of 1863. Events start in August and culminate on October 14th, the anniversary of the battle of Bristoe Station:

“There Was a Want of Vigilance” – Battle of Bristoe Station Exhibit at the Manassas Museum

August-October, Manassas Museum ($5 admission)

9101 Prince William St, Manassas

Exhibit will feature rare artifacts from the Battle of Bristoe Station. Featured items will include personal effects of A.P. Hill and other leading participants of the battle. Exhibit cosponsored by the Prince William County Historic Preservation Division and the Manassas Museum.

Contact Manassas Museum for more information at 703-368-1873

Bristoe Station Campaign 150th Symposium

Saturday – Sunday, September 14-15, 2013

$75 per person, Symposium will take place at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel, Manassas, VA

Join local and national historians on an exciting two day symposium covering Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s last offensive campaign of the Civil War at Bristoe Station. The first day of the symposium offers a full day of lectures and discussions on the actions and battles in the Bristoe Campaign, book signings and lunch. The second day includes a seven hour bus tour of the Bristoe Campaign with a boxed lunch. Contact Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park at 703-366-3049 for more information. For reservations, contact 703-792-4754 or rorrison@pwcgov.org

Bristoe Station Campaign Bus Tour

Saturday, October 5, 2013

$85 per person, includes lunch. Reservations required, space is limited

Enjoy a full day with an in-depth tour of the sites and battlefields that made up the Bristoe Campaign. Stops will include: Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park, Auburn, Remington and Buckland. Historians will explain how this important campaign impacted soldiers, civilians and its overall impact on the outcome of the Civil War. Participants will have a chance to see little known or visited sites. Contact Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park at 703-366-3049 for more information and reservations.

Battle of Bristoe Station 150th Commemorative Weekend

Saturday – Sunday, October 12-13, 2013

Free, donations encouraged

To commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Bristoe Station, tours, musical performances, lectures, tours and living history demonstrations and encampments to represent the soldiers and units present at the battle in 1863. Weekend kicks off on Saturday at 10am with a dedication ceremony featuring keynote speaker Dr. James I. Robertson Jr. The Virginia History Mobile will be available on Saturday and a Youth Activity Tent will also be available all weekend. Contact Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park at 703-366-3049 for more information.

Parking located at the Bristow Shopping Center with shuttle bus service to the Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park.

150th Anniversary of the Battle of Bristoe Station

Monday, October 14, 2013

Walking Tours Free, Car Caravan and Bus Tours have separate fee

Join Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park staff on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Bristoe Station for exclusive tours of the battlefield. Tours will take place “in time” of the events in 1863, including Prelude to Battle Walking Tour, In the Footsteps of North Carolina walk tour and a Musical Tribute to the fallen at Bristoe Station. Events tentative as scheduled:

9:00am 11am – Car Caravan Tour of Bristoe Station Campaign Sites ($25 fee per vehicle)

Tour Will Begin and end at Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park parking lot

11:30am—1:30pm – Bus Tour of exclusive Bristoe Station Battlefield sites off of the Park

($30 per person, reservations recommended, light refreshments provided)

Tour Will Begin and End at Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park parking lot

2:30pm – “Their Moment, Our Time” Tours – Tours of the Battle of Bristoe Station at the time of the battle, 150 years later

Tour Will Begin at Program Tent, moderate walking, water available

6:00pm – 6:15pm – Tours End, Musical Tribute and Taps

Contact Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park at 703-366-3049 for tour schedule, reservations and more information.

Parking located at the Bristow Shopping Center with shuttle bus service to the Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park