Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Ohio Artillery Regiment

Ohio’s artillery required half a page in the third quarter, 1863 summary:

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Topping this section is the 1st Ohio Light Artillery Regiment.  An appropriate administrative space, then listings for the independent batteries – 1st through 26th.  But notice the 13th Battery (which never fully organized, and was broken up in 1862) and the 23rd Battery (which became Simmonds’ Independent Battery and was allocated to Kentucky).  At the bottom of this list are two infantry regiments reporting artillery and stores on hand.  Not on this listing is a section of mountain howitzers assigned to the 2nd Ohio Cavalry at this time of the war, which we will discuss.  Thus we have an itinerary for the next set of postings on this theme.

Starting this Ohio section, we have Colonel James Barnett’s 1st Ohio Light Artillery.  Barnett was, at the time, serving as Chief of Artillery, Army of the Cumberland.  And it is his detailed report from the Chickamauga Campaign that I use to validate many of the particulars for batteries involved with that action.  For the quarter, the Ordnance Department received returns for ten of the twelve batteries:

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The locations and activities of these batteries reflects many of the “moving pieces” in play during the third quarter of 1863:

  • Battery A: At Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles, in a return received in August 1864. Captain Wilbur F. Goodspeed remained in command of this battery assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps, Army of the Cumberland.  The battery saw action on both September 19 and 20. On the morning of the 20th battery was particularly hard pressed around 10 a.m. and, with support of the 15th Ohio Infantry, drove back a Confederate charge with double canister at range of 50 yards.  While Goodspeed kept his guns through the battle, he lost 15 horses.  Furthermore “… in consequence of not unharsessing for six days…” he expected to lose another 25, as he reported from Chattanooga after the Federal retreat.  Here’s a photo from their position on Kelly Field where they fought during the morning of September 20:

Chickamauga 482

  • Battery B: Also reporting at Chattanooga, with two 6-pdr field guns and two 3.80-inch James Rifles.   The battery remained in Second Division, Twenty-First Corps and Captain William E. Standart served as division chief of artillery.  In his place, Lieutenant Norman A. Baldwin commanded the battery.  On September 19, the battery fired 159 rounds.  On September 20, they occupied a position behind breastworks in the heart of Thomas’s line (what is today Battleline Road).  Fighting in their sector began at 8 a.m. And the battery only relinquished those works when ordered to the rear around 5 p.m., having fired 986 rounds (pretty much all they had coming into action).  Three of the James rifles were disabled in the fighting.  Only one could be recovered back to Chattanooga.  The battery lost thirteen horses; one man killed, eight wounded, and four missing.
  • Battery C: Reporting at Chattanooga with two 12-pdr Napoleons and three 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Captain Daniel K. Southwick commanded the battery at the start of the quarter.  However he resigned (officially dated to October 19).  Lieutenant Marco B. Gary led the battery as they marched with Third Division, Fourteenth Corps toward Chickamauga Creek.  The battery was in action both days of the battle.  As it was often employed by section, Lieutenants Hiram W. Turner, Thomas King, and Jerome B. Stevens are listed on the battery’s War Department tablets.  Caught up in the confusion in the afternoon of September 20, Gary took it upon himself to move the battery to the rear.  Having lost 25 horses already, this was a daunting task even without Confederate pressure.  Gary reported losing one James rifle, one caisson, and parts of two other caissons.  All told the battery expended 498 rounds in the battle.
  • Battery D: At Knoxville, Tennessee with four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. At the end of the previous quarter, the battery was serving by section in support of different cavalry divisions.  In July, the battery was consolidated, in eastern Tennessee, and transferred to the First Division, Twenty-third Corps.  Captain Andrew J. Konkle (or Conkle on some returns) commanded.  By August, the battery was again transferred.  This time to the Third Division of the same corps.  Lieutenant William H. Pease commanded when Konkle took command of the corps reserve artillery.
  • Battery E: No report. This battery was assigned to Second Division, Reserve Corps, part of the Nashville garrison when the quarter began.  Lieutenant Stephen W. Dorsey remained in command of the battery.  Later in July, the battery moved forward to Chattanooga, reaching Bridgeport in October. Captain Warren P. Edgarton, of the battery, was in command of the Nashville garrison artillery.
  • Battery F: No report. Captain Daniel T. Cockerill was still recovering from wounds.  His immediate replacement, Lieutenant Norval Osborn, was later replaced (due to date of rank) by Lieutenant Giles J. Cockerill.  The battery was assigned to Second Division, Twenty-first Corps. The battery had four James rifles and two 12-pdr field howitzers.  Leaving the field on September 20, the battery had only fifteen rounds left in their chests.
  • Battery G: At Chattanooga, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Alexander Marshall’s battery assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  In action at Chickamauga, the battery fired 294 rounds.
  • Battery H: Reporting at Culpeper, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain James F. Huntington resumed command duties during the summer.  The battery Transferred to the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac in August.
  • Battery I: In Lookout Valley, Tennessee, based on a January 1864 receipt date, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Hubert Dilger’s battery was assigned to Eleventh Corps.  The battery was sent west, with the rest of Eleventh Corps, to reinforce Chattanooga, with movement starting in late September.
  • Battery K: Bridgeport, Alabama, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Part of the Eleventh Corps, along with Battery I, this battery moved to reinforce Chattanooga in late September. Captain Lewis Heckman remained in command of the battery.  But in his absence Lieutenants Columbus Rodamour led the battery.  Later, in Tennessee, Lieutenant Nicholas Sahm, of Company I, 1st New York Artillery, led the battery in operations around Chattanooga.
  • Battery L: At Culpeper, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Frank C. Gibbs had command of this battery, supporting Fifth Corps.
  • Battery M: Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 3-inch rifles and four 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Frederick Schultz commanded this battery, assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  At Chickamauga, the battery fired 415 rounds.

Turning now to the ammunition reports, we have a lot of smoothbore rounds to count:

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Seven batteries with smoothbore:

  • Battery A: 50 shot, 56 shell, 71 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr napoleons.
  • Battery B: 20 shot, 59 case, and 42 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery C: 52 shot, 13 shell, 96 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; but also 33 canister for 6-pdr field guns (which may have been used in the battery’s James rifles).
  • Battery G: 176 shot, 64 shell, 160 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery I: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery K: 192 shot, 44 shell, 142 case, and 14 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L: 296 shot, 111 shell, 301 case, and 118 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

With several mixed batteries, there were also several reporting Hotchkiss projectiles for rifled guns:

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Six batteries reporting:

  • Battery A: 86 shot for 3.80-inch James.
  • Battery C: 55 percussion shell for 3.80-inch James.
  • Battery D: 161 canister, 238 percussion shell, and 460 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 77 canister, 175 percussion shell, and 120 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 339 shot, 92 canister, and 27 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 127 canister, 75 percussion shell, 98 fuse shell, and 99 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles; and 63 shot for 3.80-inch James rifles.

The report of over fifty 3-inch shot per gun in Battery H is worth noting.  No conclusions to draw.  But that is a significant deviation from normal allocations.

We can narrow down the next page to show only the remaining Hotchkiss columns with the James projectiles:

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The Hotchkiss columns first:

  • Battery A: 139 canister for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery C: 7 canister for 3.80-inch James rifles.

Over to the James columns:

  • Battery C: 69 shot and 61 shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.

Continuing with the rifled projectiles, we consider next the Schenkl projectiles:

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Four batteries with those on hand:

  • Battery A: 186 shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery B: 70 shot and 210 shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery C: 2010 shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery H: 729 shell and 40 case for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly we have the small arms:

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By battery:

  • Battery A: Seven horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Eighteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Six horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D: Twenty-eight navy revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: Six army revolvers and ten cavalry sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Nine army revolvers and thirty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Five army revolvers and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Nineteen navy revolvers and thirty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Six army revolvers and six cavalry sabers.

The small arms totals might look thin.  And one might think those due to losses at Chickamauga.  Though there were small arms lost in the battle, and reflecting in the totals on the summary, the 1st Ohio batteries did not carry many into the quarter.  And thus didn’t go into action on September 19 with an abundance of edged weapons and pistols.  Given the close quarters at which some of the fighting took place in that battle, the scarcity of small arms is an important interpretive factor, I feel.

next installment will look at the first twelve independent batteries of Ohio.

 

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Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – New York Independent Batteries, Part 2

In the previous installment, for the third quarter of 1863 we detailed the first dozen New York Independent Batteries.  Of those still on active duty, their service was almost entirely in Virginia (with one battery in the District of Columbia the exception).  But for the next dozen – 13th through 24th Batteries – we find greater geographic distribution:

0273_1_Snip_NY_IND2 Note that nine of the twelve have returns.  Six were timely – arriving in October or November of 1863.  But the other three were tardy, with one arriving in February the next year, another in October 1864, and the last not until May 1865 (perhaps as the battery was attending the last details of paperwork before mustering out?):

  • 13th Independent Battery: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  When the Eleventh Corps left Culpeper, Virginia, to reinforce Chattanooga, during the last week of September, the 13th Battery was among their number.  Captain William Wheeler, promoted in August, commanded the battery.
  • 14th Independent Battery: No return. This battery was broken up starting in the spring of 1862.  The first section was initially assigned to Battery C, 4th US Artillery, in March 1862, but later transferred to Battery G, 1st New York Artillery, in January 1863.  The second section was also transferred to Battery G, 1st New York, in May 1862.  At the same time the third section went to Battery B, 1st New York in May 1862.  The battery was formally disbanded in September 1863.  It’s last commander, Captain James Rorty, was killed in action at Gettysburg while in temporary with Battery B, 1st New York.
  • 15th Battery:  In Culpeper, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery “made the rounds” in the Artillery Reserve of the Army of the Potomac.  Under Captain Patrick Hart, the battery started the summer in the 1st Volunteer Brigade of that reserve.  In early August, they moved to the 4th Volunteer Brigade.  But by the end of the month, they were assigned to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade.
  • 16th Battery: No return. Captain Frederick L. Hiller’s battery remained with the Seventh Corps and stationed at Newport News, Virginia. Earlier in the year, the battery reported six 10-pdr Parrott Rifles.
  • 17th Battery: In Centreville, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain George T. Anthony’s battery was at that time assigned to King’s Division, the Defenses of Washington (Twenty-second Corps).
  • 18th Battery: At Baton Rouge, Louisiana with four (down from six) 20-pdr Parrotts.  The report was not received in Washington until May 1865!  After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery was sent to the defenses of New Orleans, still in the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain Albert G. Mack retained command.
  • 19th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. At the end of June, the 19th Battery transferred from the Seventh Corps (serving at Suffolk) to the Washington Defenses, Twenty-second Corps.  Captain William H. Stahl succumbed to typhoid fever on September 15, 1863.  Captain Edward W. Rogers replaced him.
  • 20th Battery: At Fort Schuyler, New York with “infantry stores” only.  Captain  Benjamin Franklin Ryer’s battery served as garrison artillery.  The battery helped suppress the New York riots in July.  And that was, more or less, their “combat” for the war.
  • 21st Battery: At Port Hudson, Louisiana with four 3-inch steel guns (make and model unspecified). The report is from February 1864.  After the fall of Port Hudson, the battery remained at that post, as part of the Reserve Artillery of the Nineteenth Corps.  Captain James Barnes remained in command.
  • 22nd Battery: No return. Earlier in February 1863 the battery became Company M, 9th New York Heavy Artillery.  The designation remained on the clerk’s report as a placeholder.
  • 23rd Battery: Washington, North Carolina with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Originally, Battery A of the New York Rocket Battalion. Captain Alfred Ransom was in charge of this battery, assigned to the District of Pamlico, Eighteenth Corps, Department of North Carolina.
  • 24th Battery: At Plymouth, North Carolina with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Another formerly of the Rocket Battalion, in this case former Battery B.  This battery was also assigned to the District of Albemarle, Eighteenth Corps, Department of North Carolina.  Captain A. Lester Cady remained in command.

 

Those details covered, we move to the ammunition and start with the smoothbore rounds:

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All Napoleons:

  • 15th Battery: 128 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 128 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 17th Battery: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 288 shot. 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 24th Battery: 359 shot, 214 shell, 448 case, and 368 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Four lines on the Hotchkiss page:

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So four batteries:

  • 13th Battery: 80 canister, 160 fuse shell, and 480 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 95 shell for 3.67-inch rifles (in this case 20-pdr Parrotts).
  • 21st Battery: 138 canister, 20 fuse shell, and 583 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 23rd Battery: 197 canister, 137 percussion shell, 360 fuse shell, and 565 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

On the next page, we can focus on just the Parrott columns:

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And that’s just for the 20-pdr Parrotts in New Orleans:

  • 18th Battery: 138 shot, 216 shell, and 89 canister for 20-pdr Parrott.

A single entry on the Schenkl page:

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  • 13th Battery: 80 Schenkl shell for 3-inch rifles.

That leaves us with the small arms:

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By battery reporting:

  • 13th Battery: Seven army revolvers, seven navy revolvers and ten (?) horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Fifteen navy revolvers and five cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Twenty army revolvers and twenty-two horse artillery sabers.
  • 18th Battery: Four .58-caliber Springfield rifled muskets, three army revolvers, thirteen cavalry sabers, and seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Seventeen navy revolvers, one cavalry saber, and twenty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • 21st Battery: Seventeen army revolvers and sixteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 23rd Battery: Sixty army revolvers and seventy-five cavalry sabers.
  • 24th Battery: Fifty-three army revolvers.

We’ll complete the New York independent batteries, and the states’ listings for the third quarter as a whole, in the next installment.

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st New York Light Artillery

We turn now to the New York listings in the third quarter summary.  Appropriately, the clerks allocated a complete page to document all of the batteries and sections from the state:

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That’s enough New York Yankees to fill the major league team and the farm system!  The First, Second (one battery), and Third regiments of artillery are there.  Along with lines for thirty-three independent batteries, though not all in service at the time.  Rounding out the page are five entries for sections from cavalry and infantry regiments (unfortunately split up within the page).  A lot to discuss.  We’ll break these down by section and start with Colonel Charles S. Wainwright’s 1st New York Light Artillery Regiment:

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Compared to our Missouri postings, the 1st New York offers a relatively clean set of returns without need of much speculation.  Be that due to Wainwright’s attention to administration… or the proximity to Washington.  Let’s cover the locations, cannon reported, commanders, and command assignments:

  • Battery A: At Pottsville, Pennsylvania, on an April 1864 receipt date, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Battery A, under Captain Thomas H. Bates, transferred to the Department of the Sesquehanna in early June 1863, specifically the District of Philadelphia.  They pulled the “arduous” duty of guarding Pottsville and the vital Yuengling Brewery… right….
  • Battery B: At Culpeper, Virginia with four 10-pdr Parrotts. Recall Lieutenant Robert E. Rogers brought this battery off the field at Gettysburg, after more senior officers fell.  At that time the battery supported Second Corps.  After Gettysburg, the battery moved to the 2nd Volunteer Brigade, Reserve Artillery, Army of the Potomac.  Lieutenant Albert S. Sheldon, recovering from his Gettysburg wound, was promoted to command the battery. Later in December, Rogers would replace Sheldon permanently.
  • Battery C: Listed at Three Mile Station, Virginia (three miles from Warrenton Junction, at a village named Casanova today) with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Almont Barnes remained in command and the battery remained with Fifth Corps.
  • Battery D: Reporting from Brandy Station, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Supporting Third Corps, Captain George B. Winslow remained in command.
  • Battery E: “Not in the service.”   Reduced by sickness and other causes during the Peninsula Campaign, members of this battery were then serving with Battery L, below.  Lieutenant William Rumsey is the ranking officer I know of, from this period, in the battery.
  • Battery F: At Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William R. Wilson remained in command.  The battery, assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, was in the Twenty-second Corps.
  • Battery G: Now at Mitchell’s Station, Virginia, in Culpeper County, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Nelson Ames’s battery transferred out of the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve in August, returning to the 2nd Corps.
  • Battery H: Also at Camp Barry with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles E. Mink remained in command.  At the end of September, the battery transferred to First Corps, Army of the Potomac.
  • Battery I: No report. Captain Michael Wiedrich commanded this battery, assigned to Eleventh Corps.  The battery had six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles at this time of the war.  The battery was sent west, with the rest of Eleventh Corps, to reinforce Chattanooga, with movement starting in late September.
  • Battery K: Reporting at Brandy Station, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. The battery remained with the battery assigned to Third Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve.  The 11th New York Independent Battery was attached to Battery K at this time, and manned two of the guns.  In August, Captain Robert H. Fitzhugh was promoted to Major.  In his place Lieutenant Edward L. Bailey led the battery.
  • Battery L: Simply “in the field” with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Listed on the order of battle as a combined Batteries E & L, Captain Gilbert H. Reynolds commanded.  The battery supported First Corps and was in Culpeper County at the end of the reporting period.
  • Battery M: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama, in January 1864, with four 10-pdr Parrott rifles.  Lieutenant Charles Winegar commanded this battery, supporting Twelfth Corps.  The battery started movement in late September with its parent formation on the long journey to reinforce Chattanooga.  So while the location as of the end of September was Virginia, within a few weeks they were transiting through Bridgeport as they played a part in the relief of the Army of the Cumberland.

For perhaps the brief moment of a single quarter within the war, all of the 1st New York Light Artillery was operating in the same theater.  When Battery H transferred to the First Corps, only Battery A (in Pennsylvania) and Battery F (in D.C.) were outside the Army of the Potomac.  However, with the departure of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps for Chattanooga in the last days of September, that arrangement changed.

Moving to the ammunition pages, we start with the smoothbore rounds reported on hand:

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Three batteries reporting, all with Napoleons:

  • Battery A: 192 shot, 64 shell, 320 case, and 136 canister.
  • Battery D: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister.
  • Battery G: 262 shot, 100 shell, 262 case, and 144 canister.

And as for the Hotchkiss projectiles:

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All for those Ordnance rifle batteries:

  • Battery C: 92 canister, 140 percussion shell, 146 fuse shell, and 456 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F: 123 canister, 56 percussion shell, 160 fuse shell, and 480(?) bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 180 canister, 130 percussion shell, and 160 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 120 canister and 362 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery L: 120 canister and 39 percussion shell for 3-inch rifles.

We can trim the next page down to look just at Parrott rounds:

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Two of those Parrott batteries:

  • Battery B: 354 shell, 297 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery M: 298 shell, 412 case, and 94 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

The rifled-gun batteries also reported Schenkl rounds on hand:

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Four reporting:

  • Battery B: 57 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery H: 293 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 353 shell and 555 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery L: 441 shell and 600 case for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly the small arms:

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A little fuzzy, but we can work with these:

  • Battery A: Seventeen Navy revolvers.
  • Battery B: Nine Army revolvers and thirteen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: One Army revolver, eight Navy revolvers, and twenty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D: Eight Army revolvers and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F: Eighteen Army revolvers, six horse artillery sabers, and sixteen foot artillery swords.
  • Battery G: Nineteen Army revolvers and twenty-seven horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Navy revolvers, fifteen cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Nine Army revolvers and thirty cavalry sabers.
  • Battery L: Sixteen Navy revolvers and nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Eight Army revolvers and two horse artillery sabers.

Once again, we see a very good set of returns for the 1st New York Light Artillery.  Where there are empty entry lines, other (official) records fill in many of the open questions.

 

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Ohio Light Artillery

The 1st Ohio LIGHT Artillery…. which needs to be emphasized, as there was a 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery.  The “heavy” regiment spent most of the war in garrison locations across Kentucky and Tennessee.  The “light” regiment, on the other hand, was active in the field supporting armies in both eastern and western theaters. Colonel of the regiment was James Barnett, who also doubled as the Chief of Artillery, Department/Army of the Cumberland.

For the second quarter of 1863, the clerks in Washington complied reports from nine of twelve batteries:

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And, as a bonus, we have a line for the 32nd Ohio Infantry and their four cannon.  As mentioned while discussing the independent batteries, the clerks opted to misplace what would become the 26th Independent Battery with the 1st Ohio Light.

Putting that on hold for the moment, let us look at the administrative details for the 1st Ohio Light:

  • Battery A: Reported, as of August 1864, at Tullahoma, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Wilbur F. Goodspeed remained in command of this battery assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • Battery B: “In the field” with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   Remaining under Captain William E. Standart, this battery was part of Second Division, Twenty-First Corps (with Standart also serving as division chief of artillery). The battery remained at Cripple Creek, Tennessee until June 24, when it moved with the rest of the division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery C: At Elk River, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Daniel K. Southwick commanded the battery assigned to Third Division, Fourteenth Corps.  The battery supported its parent division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery D: No report. Battery D was, as of the June 30 reporting date, in the field supporting the Cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland, supporting different operations and operating by sections.  One section, under Captain Andrew J. Konkle supported Second Brigade, First Division, of the corps.  Another, under Lieutenant Nathaniel M. Newell, supported First Brigade, Second Division.  A third section supported the cavalry of the Twenty-third Corps, Department of the Ohio, under Lieutenant Henry C. Lloyd. The battery was armed with 3-inch Ordnance rifles.
  • Battery E: No report. This battery was assigned to Second Division, Reserve Corps, still recovering from heavy losses the previous winter at Stones River.  It was posted to Nashville through the spring.  Lieutenant Stephen W. Dorsey remained in command of the battery.  Later in July, the battery moved forward to Chattanooga.  Captain Warren P. Edgarton, of the battery, was in command of the Nashville garrison artillery.
  • Battery F: No report. Captain Daniel T. Cockerill remained in command of this battery, part of Second Division, Twenty-first Corps. Consolidated reports, complied at the department, indicate the battery had six 12-pdr Napoleons and five 3.80-inch James Rifles (!).
  • Battery G: At Decherd, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Alexander Marshall’s battery assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  As such, they were involved with the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery H: At Brownsville, Maryland (likely a location associated with the August 7th report date) with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Although Captain James F. Huntington held the command billet, Lieutenant George W. Norton lead the battery in the field.  Transferred to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac in late spring.  Thus, instead sitting at the base of South Mountain on June 30, Battery H was north of Frederick, Maryland.
  • Battery I: At Emmitsburg, Maryland with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Hubert Dilger’s battery was assigned to Eleventh Corps.  Dilger and his battery would do good work supporting the left of the corps on July 1.
  • Battery K: Bridgeport, Alabama, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain William L. De Beck resigned on May 11, 1863, and was replaced by Captain Lewis Heckman.  This battery supported Eleventh Corps.  On July 1, the battery went into action just on the edge of Gettysburg (corner of Carlisle Street and Lincoln Avenue today).  Heckman reported firing 113 rounds that day, “mostly canister”, in an effort to delay the Confederate advance. The battery lost two men killed, eleven men wounded, nine horses, and two pieces.  The location is valid for later in the fall when the battery, along with the rest of the Eleventh Corps, reinforced Chattanooga.
  • Battery L: “In the field” with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Frank C. Gibbs had command of this battery, supporting Fifth Corps.  The battery played a vital role defending Little Round Top on July 2, 1863.
  • Battery M: Stevenson, Alabama with two 3-inch guns and four 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Frederick Schultz commanded this battery, assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  Thus, instead of being just south of Bridgeport, Alabama, as indicated on this line, the battery was further north, near Hoover’s Gap, on June 30, 1863.

As mentioned, one line from outside the regiment:

  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  Company F, 32nd Ohio was originally formed in August 1861.  In July 1862, the company was detached for service as artillery and known as “Potts’s Ohio Battery” after it’s first commander, Captain Benjamin F. Potts.  The battery served in the Shenandoah and was caught up in the surrender at Harpers Ferry in September 1862.  The battery was exchanged, along with the rest of the regiment, on January 21, 1863.  The 32nd was then assigned to Third Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, then in operations against Vicksburg.   At Champion’s Hill, the brigade captured a Confederate battery.  The division commander, Major General John A. Logan, knowing of the unit’s artillery service, assigned the captured guns to Company F.  Under Captain Theobold D. Yost, they were called “Yost’s Captured Battery” and were posted opposite Fort Hill in the Vicksburg siege lines.  After the siege, the battery was broken up, with men assigned to other batteries.  However, in December 1863, the battery was officially reformed as the 26th (Independent) Ohio Battery.  The exact identification of the guns assigned to the battery during the siege, being captured from Confederates, is open for interpretation.

From top to bottom, including the battery formed from the 32nd, we see all these batteries experienced active field service that summer.

Moving to the ammunition pages, we see a busy section for smoothbore projectiles:

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A pyramid of rounds:

  • Battery A: 56 shot, 64 shell, 108 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery B: 40 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery C: 13 shot, 42 case, and 46 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 96 shot, 82 shell, 96 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 77 shot for 6-pdr field guns; 211 shot, 64 shell, 128 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 143 case and 46 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery I: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery K: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L: 300 shot, 102 shell, 280 case, and 117 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 17 shell and 20 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Two flags to consider with this list.  Battery C didn’t have 6-pdrs at this stage of the war, having turned those in sometime in January.  But the rounds, theoretically, could be fired from their James rifles.  So those might have simply been residual ammunition left over from earlier service… or service ammunition set aside for special use with the rifles.

Battery G had no use at all for 6-pdr rounds.  And use of howitzer rounds in Napoleons would be puzzling.  So this escapes any simple conjecture.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, we consider the Hotchkiss columns:

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Two calibers in play here – 3-inch and 3.80-inch:

  • Battery A: 90 shot for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 20 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 109 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 77 canister, 96 percussion shell, and 120 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; Also 121 percussion shell for 3.80-inch rifles!!!
  • Battery K: 98 canister and 643 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 56 canister, 115 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; And 75 shot, 56 fuse shell, and 180 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 107 fuse shell and 451 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

As Battery G had no use for James caliber projectiles, the quantities of that caliber on hand may have been a transcription error by the clerks.  But where to put 121 percussion shells, I don’t know.

The next page offers a mix of Hotchkiss, Dyer’s, and James projectiles.

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Taking these in turn, first the “left over” Hotchkiss columns:

  • Battery A: 140 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 148 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 94 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Here again we see Battery G with James-caliber projectiles… but no James rifles on hand.

Dyer’s projectiles:

  • Battery G: 96 shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

We don’t often see Dyer’s projectiles issued to batteries in the western theater.

James’ projectiles:

  • Battery C: 102 shot and 61 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Turning to the Shenkl columns on the next page:

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Five batteries reported quantities:

  • Battery A: 318 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 240 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 239 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 349 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 278 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Two batteries reported Tatham’s canister:

  • Battery B: 180 canister for 3.80-inch.
  • Battery M: 66 canister for 3.80-inch.

Lastly we move to the small arms:

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By battery:

  • Battery A: Three Navy revolvers, two cavalry sabers, and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Twenty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Just eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: Nine Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Army revolvers and thirty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Twelve Navy revolvers and thirty-four horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Twelve Army revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Nineteen Navy revolvers and thirty-four (?) foot artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Seven Army revolvers and three (?) cavalry sabers.

Closing out the Ohio batteries, we find that at the closing date for the second quarter, 1863, all of the 1st Light Regiment were well employed.  And we must also add the fine work by Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry to that list.

150 years ago: Railroads west to Tennessee

If you read the monuments at Gettysburg for the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps, specifically the battle honors of the regiments, you will notice a lot of western place-names listed along with the great eastern battlefields.  Most recall this is due to the transfer of the two corps in the fall of 1863 to reinforce the besieged Army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga.  We often wave our hand over the map to explain this movement, but forget this was a herculean effort of strategic mobility.

Earlier in the season, the Confederates shifted part of General James Longstreet’s Corps to northern Georgia using some sixteen different railroad lines.  The first of those troops left the station in Orange, Virginia on September 8 or 9, 1863.  The lead elements of the force arrived in Georgia in time for the battle of Chickamauga.  But it is a misconception to say the movement was complete at that time.  Significant combat force remained on the trains or at the depots on September 20, and baggage would arrive only in the weeks following the battle.

Now it was time for the Federals to demonstrate their rail lines.  As reports from the battle trickled into Washington, President Abraham Lincoln, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, and others debated the best way to reinforce Major-General William Rosecrans’ (for the moment) Army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga.  On paper, Major-General Ambrose Burnside was close by at Knoxville.  But in reality the terrain did not allow for a rapid march, particularly where provisions were scarce and Confederate raiders were thick.  Likewise the movement of 20,000 troops from Vicksburg, Mississippi, under command of Major-General William T. Sherman, looked easy on paper but was not easily conducted on the ground.

The solution offered was to move two corps from the Army of the Potomac in Virginia out by rail to Tennessee.  Though some cautioned the movement would require over a month. But such estimates were largely based on pre-war experience.  Stanton and the railroad men felt the move could be done with much more speed, if properly organized.  Orders went out on September 24 to Major-General George Meade to release the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps for movement.

Initially, the Eleventh was to use Bristoe Station and Rappahannock Station.  But after organizing the rolling stock and coordinating troop movements, Major-General O.O. Howard loaded his troops at Manassas Junction (with artillery going on the trains at Alexandria).  The Twelfth loaded at Brandy Station.   And there was some counter-marching required in order to keep this movement of troops out of sight from the Confederate observers on Clark’s Mountain.

To reach Chattanooga, the troops started their journey on the Orange & Alexandria (O&A) at some of the war’s most important rail junctions.  The trains then would move, by way of Washington, to Baltimore and switch to the B&O for a westward leg. Reaching the Ohio River at Benwood, the troops were to ferry (later move by pontoon bridge) across to Bellaire, Ohio where they would board trains on the Central Ohio Railroad and make the run to Columbus, Ohio.  Next the troops would switch to the Indiana Central and move to Indianapolis.  There the plan called for another transfer onto the Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis Railroad for a trip to Jeffersonville, Indiana.  Another ferry ride would put the troops in Louisville, Kentucky where they would take the Louisville & Nashville Railroad (L&N).  In Nashville the troops would board trains for their last leg on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad (N&C).  The closest terminus would be Bridgeport, Alabama.  All told the troops would transit eight states, plus the District of Columbia, and cross four major rivers (the Ohio and the Potomac twice), in their journey of 1200 miles.

Leading this movement effort was a mix of civilian and military officials.  Stanton coordinated with John M. Garrett of the B&O, Samuel M. Felton of the Pennsylvania Railroad, H.J. Jewett of the Central Ohio, James Guthrie of the L&N, and several others with connecting rail lines.  And on the military side, Colonel Thomas Scott (who was more a War Department official with military rank) supervised the operation.  There was at times friction with Colonel William Innes, who supervised Rosecrans’ railroad department.  But Stanton’s directives brushed aside any disagreements.

While planning the move on September 23, Stanton forwarded inquiries to Brigadier-General Jeremiah T. Boyle in regards to the L&N:

Please ascertain and report to me immediately:
1. How many men can be transported by employing the whole rolling stock of the road from Louisville to Nashville, enumerating the number of cars of every description that could be employed?
2. How many hours it usually takes to make the trip from Nashville to Louisville, and at what rate of speed?
3. Is the road from Nashville to Chattanooga the same gauge as the road from Louisville to Nashville, so that cars can go direct from Louisville to Chattanooga, and what time does it take from Nashville to Chattanooga?
4. If the gauge of the roads is different, what is the supply of rolling stock on the  [Nashville] and Chattanooga road?

The following morning, Boyle responded that the L&N could transport 3,000 men a day, requiring sixteen hours to cover the 185 mile distance.  The L&N connected to the N&C in Nashville, but Boyle was unable to determine the rates for that last leg of the trip.  Military campaigns of the last eight months had used up and badly damaged the N&C, but with repairs, Boyle felt the lines could support 4,000 men.

Contrary to some statements you hear today, the Federal railroad lines were not uniform gauge.  An alternative route crossing the Ohio at Cincinnati and using the Covington & Lexington Railroad was considered.  However, the president of that line warned of the different gauge of track between Lexington and Louisville.  Later, the War Department would spend an estimated $38,000 to rectify this issue.  Another modification to the rail lines was the laying of connecting track in Indianapolis to allow cars to switch over, instead of having the troops disembark.

On September 25, the first troop cars passed through Washington as the first of nearly three days of nearly continual movement through the city.  Some 390 B&O railcars sent down the O&A allowed for rapid transition in Baltimore.  By September 28 the first troop trains reached Indianapolis.  A day later those lead elements prepared to recross the Ohio River into Kentucky at Louisville.  On September 30, four trains arrived in Nashville with the lead elements of the Eleventh Corps.  Within a few days, the bulk of the Eleventh Corps arrived at Bridgeport, where they looked over the Tennessee River at the broken bridge which prevented their transit to Chattanooga.

A few days later, the troop movement was complete with the two corps ready to assume operations in what would become the Chattanooga Campaign.  Historian Thomas Weber summarized the movement:

By October 3, the first regiments of the 11th Corps began arriving at their base camp 26 miles from Chattanooga.  October 6, the last regiment passed through Indianapolis, and by October 8, the troop movement was complete.  In 14 days, 23,000 men had moved 1,233 miles, an accomplishment not to be surpassed during the war …. The baggage of the two corps, including horses, wagons, ambulances, and commissary, moved west over the same route during the first two weeks of October…. Thus the complete transfer of men and equipment took only about three weeks, a time so far under the general estimate that it must have greatly surprised Halleck and Lincoln.

Indeed, the movement put two veteran corps in a place that left the Confederates concerned.  More than the bickering among generals, I would submit the rapid movement of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps contained the Confederate gains in September 1863.

And as a side note, this is perhaps the only post narrative that one might mention “Brandy Station” with “Louisville” and “Bridgeport.”  More than anything, this troop movement shows how interconnected the theaters of war really were.

(Citations from OR, Series I, Volume 29, Part I, Serial 48, page 147; Thomas Weber, The Northern Railroads in the Civil War: 1861-1865, Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1952, page 186.)