“Ninety-eight of these shells struck the vessel”: Destruction of the blockade runner Flora

At least four different blockade runners used the name “Flora.”  The third of these was an iron steamer owned by the Importing and Exporting Company of Georgia, associated with the Lamars of that state.  On October 18, the Flora left Nassau for her maiden run through the blockade, heading for Charleston.  Bad luck dogged theContinue reading ““Ninety-eight of these shells struck the vessel”: Destruction of the blockade runner Flora”

“I desire to call your attention to the following points”: Foster’s instructions to Scammon, October 1864

When he first took command of the Department of the South in the spring of 1864, Major-General John Foster inherited the veteran Brigadier-General Alexander Schimmelfennig in command of Federal forces on Folly and Morris Islands – officially the Northern District, but the Charleston Front, if I may.  When Schimmelfenning departed on leave, for health reasons,Continue reading ““I desire to call your attention to the following points”: Foster’s instructions to Scammon, October 1864″

Batteries and forts of the Department of the South, June 1864

On June 8, 1864, First Lieutenant Charles Suter, of the Chief Engineer’s office, submitted a detailed report on the fortifications, and their armaments, throughout the Department of the South.  That lengthy report offers another point of reference with regard to the garrisoning and posturing in the department. So consider this sort of a “resource” postContinue reading “Batteries and forts of the Department of the South, June 1864”