January 20, 1865: Logistic constraints and rains delay Sherman’s movements

Following the Confederate withdrawal from Pocotaligo on the night of January 14, 1865, Major-General Frank Blair’s Seventeenth Corps consolidated positions for its foothold in South Carolina (Point #1 on the map below).  Immediately, Federal officers began looking at the Confederate line along the Salkehatchie River for possible crossing points. Further south, Major-General Henry Slocum’s LeftContinue reading “January 20, 1865: Logistic constraints and rains delay Sherman’s movements”

“Should any delay occur it will arise from the endless excuses made by ladies….”: Savannah families permitted to pass through the lines

Relative to other points, say Vicksburg or Atlanta, the capture of Savannah to Federal troops in December 1864 involved a very short siege.  The speed of that campaign and the Confederate military’s focus on extracting their forces meant that a sizable population was left behind in the city.  And a large number of those leftContinue reading ““Should any delay occur it will arise from the endless excuses made by ladies….”: Savannah families permitted to pass through the lines”

Marching Through Georgia, November 22, 1864: Milledgeville and Griswoldville

If there was a Weather Channel around, for November 22, 1864, the prediction offered would have been “cold with continued rain mixed with snow, clearing in the afternoon.”  The overnight temperatures froze General Mud, which was a small consolation for those marching on a cold day.  Major-General William T. Sherman wanted to close the firstContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, November 22, 1864: Milledgeville and Griswoldville”