Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Tennessee Light Artillery

For the previous quarter, we saw the clerks at the Ordnance Department had single line allocated for batteries formed from Tennessee volunteers.  At that time, there were two light artillery batteries, formed from Tennessee unionists.  Though others were forming up.  And two regiments of heavy artillery were getting organized, being recruited from the contraband camps in west Tennessee. 

Moving into the third quarter, the clerks still offered no clarity for the Tennessee artillerymen:

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The entry as “1st Battery Artillery” from Tennessee is not specific.  There were two batteries at this time which could lay claim as the 1st Tennessee Battery – The 1st East Tennessee Battery and 1st Middle Tennessee Battery.  But that cumbersome designation system was soon reconciled with both batteries entered into the 1st Tennessee Light Artillery Regiment.  Some sources indicate the regiment was authorized in June 1862.  And there is no doubt the formation was mentioned by authorities from that point forward. But not until November 1, 1863 was the regiment properly organized with commander appointed.  And that commander was Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Clay Crawford.  The regiment, which arguably was but a battalion, comprised of five batteries:

  • Battery A: This was the former 1st Middle Tennessee battery, commanded by Captain Ephraim P. Abbott.  The battery was assigned to Third Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland. The battery moved down from Murfreesboro to Chattanooga in September, arriving just after the battle of Chickamauga.  Earlier in the summer, the battery reported two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery B: This was the 1st East Tennessee Battery, and had been commanded by Captain Robert C. Crawford.  By the summer of 1863 it was assigned to the Fourth Division, District of Kentucky.  This battery played a small part in Burnside’s East Tennessee Campaign.  Captain James A. Childress commanded.  The battery was on duty around the Cumberland Gap at the end of September.
  • Battery C: Still being organized, this battery would not muster until early 1864.  Captain Vincent Myers would command. 
  • Battery D:  Likewise still organizing and not mustering until 1864.  Captain David R. Young would command.
  • Battery E: Assigned to the District of North Central Kentucky.  Captain Henry C. Lloyd commanded this battery.  This battery served at various posts – Bonneville, Camp Nelson, Flemmingsburg, Mt. Sterling, and Paris – through the spring of 1864.

In addition to those listed, Batteries F, G, and K appear later in later organization tables.  But at the close of the third quarter of 1863, those were not even planned.  With no returns submitted, we have no cannon, ammunition, or even small arms to discuss in regard to these Tennessee artillerists.  But the record is clear in that three batteries from the 1st Tennessee Light Artillery were mustered as of the end of September and were doing duty. 

But there are other batteries we should tally here. There actually was a fourth light battery, and possibly a fifth, that existed in the fall of 1863 and should mentioned here.  In the “definitely” category is the Memphis Light Artillery.  This battery is sometimes mentioned as the 1st Tennessee Battery, African Descent (or A.D.).  Forming, starting the late summer of 1863, in Memphis and commanded by Captain Carl A. Lamberg (formerly of the 3rd Michigan Battery, which was then at Memphis), the battery’s official muster date was November 23. Later, in the following year, the battery would be re-designated as U.S.C.T. and assigned to the 2nd U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery as Battery F.

In the “maybe” category is an independent battery called “Hurlbut’s Battery.”  During the Vicksburg Campaign, the garrison in Memphis formed a “River Guard” to maintain security along the Mississippi River near the city.  In command of this guard was Major George Cubberly, from the 89th Indiana.  For those duties, Cubberly required some light artillery.  From the garrison’s armory came two 3.80-inch James Rifles and two 6-pdr field guns. This temporary battery actually saw limited action against Confederates along the river.  From one roll:

Hurlbut’s Battery consists of 2 James Rifled pieces and 2 smooth bore 6 pounders. Was in engagement at Bradley’s Landing, Ark., June 17, [1863] about 18 miles from Memphis, Tenn., up the river.  Fired about 60 shell with James Rifled pieces.


Later in the summer, the battery appears on returns in the First Brigade, District of Memphis (along with the Memphis Light Artillery, for what it is worth).   Lieutenant Albert Cudney commanded, from, apparently, Battery I, 1st Illinois Artillery.  And the battery appears on Sixteenth Corps orders at the first of September.  All of which still gives us little to go on.  The battery, temporary as it was, certainly existed during the third quarter of 1863.  And it saw action… at least sixty rounds worth of action.  Though it was likely broken up shortly afterwards.  As for its attribution to Tennessee, that is less certain.  With only an index card heading to work from, evidence is thin.  Rather, this temporary, improvised battery was likely made up of more Illinois or Indiana troops than Tennessee boys.

In summary, though the clerks did not have returns to work from, Tennessee had three batteries in Federal service at the end of September, one USCT battery forming, plus a couple more “unionist” batteries forming.   And that’s why we have a heading for Tennessee in the third quarter, 1863 summaries.

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Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Illinois Artillery Regiment

If we just focus on the service of individual batteries from the 1st Illinois Artillery Regiment, we’d have a noteworthy and eventful narrative of service in some of the war’s great battles.  But the regiment’s contribution to the Federal war effort included some important and influential senior officers.  The regiment’s first commander was Colonel Joseph D. Webster, a regular Army officer, having resigned in 1854, and Mexican War veteran.  Webster served both as commander of the regiment and as General Grant’s chief of staff through the first year of the war – and through many of those early western theater campaigns.  After November 1862, Webster took a staff position managing transportation for Grant.  And later in the war, he would serve as Major-General William T. Sherman’s chief of staff.  With a promotion to brigadier-general in April 1863, Webster relinquished command of the 1st Illinois.

Ezra Taylor, with promotion from major to colonel, succeeded Webster in command.  But like many of the light artillery regimental commanders, Taylor did not directly command these subordinate batteries.  Rather, in relation to the batteries, the regimental command was more an administrative head than actual field command.  Instead, Taylor served as an artillery chief at divisional, corps, and army level.  While in command of the 1st Illinois in the fall of 1863, Taylor was also Sherman’s chief of artillery (Fifteenth Corps).  Later in the winter, Taylor became the artillery chief of the Army of the Tennessee. However, Taylor’s active service came to an end after a serious wound at the battle of Dallas, on May 28, 1864.

But all of that was in the future at the end of September 1863, and the returns of the 1st Illinois were still the responsibility, administratively speaking, of Colonel Taylor.  How well did he attend those details?

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We find returns for eleven of twelve batteries.  But that is a little deceptive, with three of those returns not received until 1864.  And one that was nearly two years late, arriving in 1865!  But at least that leaves us numbers to consider:

  • Battery A: Larkinsville, Alabama, with five 12-pdr Napoleons and one 10-pdr Parrott.  That is where the battery wintered in 1864, when the report was received at the Department.  In September 1863 the battery was still assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, with Captain Peter P. Wood in command.  After the fall of Vicksburg, the battery was part of the force sent to Jackson.  Then in late September, with the Fifteenth Corps sent to reinforce the beleaguered Army of the Cumberland, Battery A was en route to Memphis, Tennessee.
  • Battery B: On the steamer Atlantic, in the Mississippi River, with five 6-pdr field guns and one 12-pdr field howitzer. Like Battery A, this battery was also assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps.  And Battery B was also heading to Memphis at the end of September, with ultimate destination of Chattanooga.  Captain Samuel E. Barrett received promotion to Major in August 1863.  Lieutenant Israel P. Rumsey was promoted to captain of the battery, with date of rank as August 13, 1863.
  • Battery C:  Reporting at Chattanooga, Tennessee with one 12-pdr field howitzers (down from three the previous quarter) and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles (down from four). The quantities reflected losses at Chickamauga, which also included a caisson and twelve horses.  Four of the battery were wounded.  Captain Mark H. Prescott returned in time to assume command from Lieutenant Edward M. Wright (who resigned on September 9), and lead it in the battle.  Remarkably, the battery only expended nineteen rounds at Chickamauga.  The battery remained with Third Division, Twentieth Corps.
  • Battery D: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles, having turned in 24-pdr field howitzers. The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, and part of the occupation force at Vicksburg.   Lieutenant George P. Cunningham remained in command, though would not be promoted to captain until December 1864.
  • Battery E: Reported at Oak Ridge, Mississippi, (about half way between Vicksburg and the Big Black River) with five 12-pdr Napoleons and one 3.80-inch James Rifle.  Lieutenant John A. Fitch remained in command, and the battery remained under Third Division, Fifteenth Corps.
  • Battery F: No report. Captain John T. Cheney remained in command of this battery.  With reorganizations after the fall of Vicksburg, the battery moved from First Division, Sixteenth Corps to Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps, and supported the move on Jackson. At the end of September, Battery F, like the rest of the Fifteenth Corps, moved to Memphis by boat and then started the march to Chattanooga.
  • Battery G:   Serving as siege artillery at Corinth, Mississippi, in Second Division, Sixteenth Corps.  Captain Raphael G. Rombauer remained in command.
  • Battery H: At Vicksburg with four 20-pdr Parrotts.  Assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps, Lieutenant Francis DeGress remained in command of this battery (he would receive promotion to captain in December).  At the end of September, the battery was in transit to Memphis to stage for the relief of Chattanooga.
  • Battery I: Also at Vicksburg, but with four 3.80-inch James Rifles. The battery transferred from the Sixteenth Corps to Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps after the fall of Vicksburg.  After the siege of Jackson, the battery was assigned a positino on the Big Black River. Lieutenant William N. Lansing, then the commander, accepted a commission in the 2nd Tennessee Colored Heavy Artillery.  His replacement was Captain Albert Cudney.  Like the other Fifteenth Corps batteries, Battery I was in transit to Memphis at the end of September.
  • Battery K: Memphis, Tennessee with with ten Union Repeating Guns.  But as noted earlier, that column was likely being utilized by the clerks to track Woodruff guns. Captain Jason B. Smith resumed command.  As many will recall, the battery accompanied Colonel Benjamin Grierson’s raid in April-May, and then operated as part of the Nineteenth Corps.  At the end of July the battery moved back to Memphis and was assigned a post near Germantown, in the Sixteenth Corps.
  • Battery L: In Washington, D.C., with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain John Rourke commanded this battery, assigned to Eighth Corps. The location given for the return is in question.  This battery was still in West Virginia through the fall and winter of 1863.
  • Battery M:  Reporting at Chattanooga, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Lieutenant George W. Spencer commanded this battery, assigned to the Second Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.

If we could summarize the service of the 1st Illinois Artillery at this stage of the war, the key word would be “Chattanooga” with the majority of batteries either holding that beleaguered city or part of the relief sent.

Moving to the ammunition columns, we have a lot to discuss with the smoothbore:

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Yes, extended columns here:

  • Battery A: 224 shot, 88 shell, 258 case, and 90(?) canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery B: 454 shot, 420 case, and 121 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 60 shell, 35 case, and 12 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery C: 42 case for 6-pdr field guns; 190 shell, 245 case, and 80 canister for 12-field howitzers.
  • Battery D: 177(?) shell for 12-pdr Napoleons; 128 case and 24 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery E: 43 shot, 119 shell, 246 case, and 158 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L:  70 shot and 504 case for 6-pdr field guns; 519 shot, 639 case, and 923 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 189 shell, 48 case, and 25 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery M: 59 shot, 156 shell, 195 case, and 48 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Referring back to the quantities reported in the previous quarter, the anomalies with Battery C (6-pdr ammunition) and Battery L (6-pdr and 12-pdr howitzer) persisted.  Battery D switched from 24-pdr field howitzers to 6-pdr rifles during the summer months, and apparently was still turning in ammunition for their old howitzers.

Turning to the rifled columns, Hotchkiss are first:

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Four batteries reporting:

  • Battery C: 149 canister, 244 percussion shell, 189 fuse shell, and 301 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery E: 17 percussion shell and 93 fuse shell for 3.80-inch James Rifles.
  • Battery L: 504 canister, 115 percussion shell, and 1005 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; 186 shot, 144 fuse shell, and 233 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 70 canister, 32 fuse shell, and 259 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

Continuing speculation from previous quarters, I suspect Battery L was charged with maintaining a store of ammunition for their brigade, explaining the presence of 3-inch rifle rounds.

Turning to the next page, we’ll break these down for clarity.  One stray Hotchkiss column:

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  • Battery H: 49 canister for 3.67-inch rifles (20-pdr Parrotts).

Further to the right, one entry for Dyer’s patent:

  • Battery L: 880 shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

Moving to the James columns:

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Three batteries reporting:

  • Battery E: 50 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery I: 64 shot, 214 shell, and 256 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery L: 387 shot, 106 shell, and 19 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Two batteries with Parrotts:

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And two batteries reporting Parrott rounds:

  • Battery A: 145 shell, 6 case, and 16 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery H: 240 shell and 96 case for 20-pdr Parrott.

The next page we have a couple of lines reporting Schenkl and Tatham projectiles:

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Schenkl first:

  • Battery L: 300 shell for 3-inch rifles; 282 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Tatham canister:

  • Battery H: 40 canister for 3.67-inch (20-pdr Parrott) rifles.
  • Battery L: 268 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Lastly, the small arms reported:

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By battery:

  • Battery A: Three Army revolvers, thirty Navy revolvers, and four (?) horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Sixteen Navy revolvers and two cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: Seven Army revolvers, ten Navy revolvers, and ten cavalry sabers.
  • Battery D: Fifteen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: Two cavalry sabers.
  • Battery I: Eleven Navy revolvers and three cavalry sabers.
  • Battery K: Sixteen breechloading carbines and ninty-five (?) cavalry sabers.
  • Battery L: Seventeen breechloading carbines, twenty-eight Army revolvers, and 148 horse artillery sabers.

Very little attrition or loss among the small arms.  Then again, I suspect we don’t have a full report.  Perhaps only what the “federal government” had issued, not counting private purchase or that issued by the state.

We’ll move forward to the 2nd Illinois Artillery in the next installment.