Sherman’s March, February 11, 1865: Kilpatrick’s defeat at Aiken translates Federal success

Mention Major-General H. Judson Kilpatrick in some circles, and you spark some harsh words.  “Kill Cavalry” they say, was just a self-centered, no-good scoundrel.  Hard to find any counterweight to redeem Kilpatrick.  By most measures, February 11, 1865 was a defeat for Kilpatrick and his command.  But that defeat, on the battlefield at Aiken, SouthContinue reading “Sherman’s March, February 11, 1865: Kilpatrick’s defeat at Aiken translates Federal success”

Marching Through Georgia, December 7, 1864: Crossing rivers under fire and by way of burning bridges

As Major-General William T. Sherman’s armies neared Savannah and the coast, the columns entered a region of lowland swamps drained by sluggish streams.  Crossing points, such as over the Ocmulgee and Ogeechee Rivers, were critical during the earlier stages of the march.  But in those coastal areas, even a minor stream could become a majorContinue reading “Marching Through Georgia, December 7, 1864: Crossing rivers under fire and by way of burning bridges”

December 4, 1864: Kilpatrick “whipped Wheeler soundly” at Waynesboro

Before daylight on December 4, 1864, Federal cavalrymen were up and moving.  Events and issued orders of the previous day set had set the stage for a cavalry battle.  The combined column of Brigadier-General Absalom Baird’s infantry division and Brigadier-General H. Judson Kilpatrick’s cavalry had spent the night in a defensive position around Thomas’ Station. Continue reading “December 4, 1864: Kilpatrick “whipped Wheeler soundly” at Waynesboro”