Fort Johnson Photo Analysis, Part IV: A wartime photo of a surviving cannon, a rare 10-inch Columbiad

The next stop on this virtual tour of wartime Fort Johnson, outside Charleston, South Carolina, is the photo designated FJ3: The location of this photo is plotted with that designation on the diagram below: I love this photo.  Mostly because of that scene-stealing cannon right up front: I’ve blogged a bit about this particular weaponContinue reading “Fort Johnson Photo Analysis, Part IV: A wartime photo of a surviving cannon, a rare 10-inch Columbiad”

“It is a cross between the gun and mortar without the advantages of either”: Hunt’s dislike of howitzers (again)

On April 23, 1864, Brigadier-General Henry Hunt passed additional instructions on to Colonel Henry L. Abbot, who was tapped to form and lead a siege train held in reserve for the Army of the Potomac.  Abbot’s task was not necessarily daunting, but required attention to detail to meet specific requirements.  Should a siege train beContinue reading ““It is a cross between the gun and mortar without the advantages of either”: Hunt’s dislike of howitzers (again)”

An Oddity for Leesburg: Tredegar Rifle Siege Howitzer

When the Civil War broke out, rifled artillery was all the rage.  Officials took old guns in hand for conversion, usually amounting to cutting rifling grooves and adding a reinforce band.  At the same time the foundries took existing patterns and bored new guns out as rifles.  Some of these turned out well.  Others notContinue reading “An Oddity for Leesburg: Tredegar Rifle Siege Howitzer”