Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Iowa’s Batteries

The next set of summaries on the sheet are from the state of Iowa.  In the previous quarter, Iowa had three numbered batteries and one detachment, to the 4th Iowa Cavalry.  The numbered batteries were easily identified.  And the 4th Iowa’s “stores on hand” we could trace back to a pair of Woodruff Guns used by the regiment.  But for the second quarter, we find the three numbered batteries accompanied by two detachments, neither of which is the 4th Iowa Cavalry:

0177_1_Snip_Iowa

Not much change on the top part, but we’ll need to address the two detachments in detail:

  • 1st Iowa Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns and two 12-pdr field howitzers.  The battery remained with First Division, Fifteenth Corps.  Captain Henry H. Griffiths commanded.
  • 2nd Iowa Battery: Reporting from Bear Creek, Mississippi with two 6-pdr field guns and two 12-pdr field howitzers. Lieutenant Joseph R. Reed commanded this battery.  In April, the Eighth Division, Sixteenth Corps transferred to become the Third Division, Fifteenth Corps.
  • 3rd Iowa Battery: At Helena, Arkansas with four 6-pdr field guns and two 12-pdr field howitzers. Captain Mortimer M. Hayden commanded this battery.  The battery was assigned to the Twelfth Division, Thirteenth Corps, carried on returns as the District of Eastern Arkansas.
  • 2nd Cav. Arty. Stores.” –  A location of LaGrange, Tennessee and with two 12-pdr mountain howitzers.   The 2nd Iowa Cavalry was part of Grierson’s Raid in April-May 1863.  Colonel Edward Hatch’s regiment was detached early on the raid to distract Confederates and returned to Grand Junction.  As for the two cannon?  More on this below.
  • 41st Iowa Infy.” – At Fort (Illegible), D.T…. Dakota Territory… with one 12-pdr mountain howitzer.   The 41st Iowa Infantry Battalion was formed from three companies out of the 14th Iowa in December 1861.  Posted to the Dakota Territories, the battalion was later transferred to the 7th Iowa Cavalry.

These last two entry lines deserve more attention.  First off, we know well the clerks in the Ordnance Department would often tally odd, non-standard weapons under various columns.  And often more clues are seen with the implements and carriages.  Looking to columns for the latter, we find:

0177_2_Snip_Iowa

Nothing very specific here.  The 2nd Iowa Cavalry would have, according to the clerks, two prairie carriages and two prairie ammunition carts.  The 41st Iowa Infantry (7th Iowa Cavalry if you prefer) had one 12-pdr mountain howitzer carriage.

The 2nd Iowa Cavalry regimental history indicates at least one of the 2-pdr Woodruff guns were detailed to the regiment during Grierson’s Raid.  So one, maybe two, of those small cannon must have still been on charge at reporting time in June 1863.  And I think this is why we see the distinction of prairie carriage and cart.  Not a lot to go on – regimental history and the odd behavior of the clerks.  But we do know the regiment was associated with the Woodruff gun at least for a short period adjacent to the reporting date.  Still, I have room four doubt.  The clerks usually carried, if they did at all, Woodruffs on the Union Repeating Gun column.  Furthermore, as we will see with the ammunition reported, there are other mis-matches to reconcile here.

As for the 41st Iowa Infantry, certainly would make sense for a unit on the frontier to have a mountain howitzer on hand.  Digging deeper, I found a pendulum hausse for 12-pdr mountain howitzer among the other equipment reported by the 41st.   So I am apt to mark this as very a correct entry line – the 41st must have had a mountain howitzer.

Moving from those speculative portions, we move on to the ammunition reported on hand. All of it smoothbore:

0179_1_Snip_Iowa

Breaking this down by battery and detachment:

  • 1st Battery: 400 shot, 320 case, and 82 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 120 shell, 160 case, and 42 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 2nd Battery: 111 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 74 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 3rd Battery: 315 shot, 303 case, and 114 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 109 shell, 156 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 2nd Iowa Cavalry: 12 shell, 108 case, and 24 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • 41st Iowa Infantry: 55 shell, 12 case, and 40 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

First note – I’ve assumed here the 12-pdr canister quantities were matched up with the field howitzers.  We’ve seen before the clerks often used those columns as either/or for 12-pdr Napoleons, 12-pdr howitzers, and 12-pdr mountain howitzers.  So I’m not too concerned about those entries.

If we read these directly, the 2nd Battery had only canister for their weapons while working the lines at Vicksburg.

And with ammunition reported by the 2nd Iowa Cavalry, there’s 144 arguments saying “12-pdr mountain howitzers” used by the troopers.

But, moving on to the rifled projectiles we find… nothing!  The Iowa artillerists were not trusted with rifles, I guess.  I’ve posted the pages (one, two, and three) for those who like to look at blank pages.

That brings us to the small arms:

0180_3_Snip_Iowa

Well that is brief:

  • 1st Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 2nd Battery: Four cavalry sabers.

The Army trusted the Iowa artillerists with edged weapons, but not pistols.

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