Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Michigan’s Batteries

Starting a fresh set of pages in the second quarter summaries, we find Michigan’s are the next set of volunteer batteries.  As mentioned in previous installments, the clerks identified Michigan’s batteries with numbered designations, as per early war convention.  But the batteries were later designated with letters within the state’s 1st Light Artillery Regiment.  I will merge the two in an attempt to cover all bases.

Michigan provided a full light artillery regiment during the war in addition to a handful of independent batteries.  The independent batteries were late war formations.  However, all twelve of the 1st Michigan Light Artillery were formed by the end of June, 1863 (just barely, that is).  Colonel Cyrus O. Loomis, formerly of 1st Batttery / Battery A, was made colonel of the regiment on October 8, 1862.  And Loomis also served as the chief of artillery for Fourteenth Corps, Army of the Cumberland (analogous to the service of Colonel Charles Wainwright in the Army of the Potomac).

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Of the twelve batteries of the 1st Michigan, only ten made the summary.  Added to those were three additional lines.  So we have some gaps to fill and questions to resolve:

  • 1st Battery (Battery A): No return.  Also known as the Loomis Battery, for its first commander. At the reporting time, this was Lieutenant George Van Pelt’s battery, assigned to First Division, Fourteenth Corps.   Battery reported five 10-pdr Parrotts in an internal report for the Army of the Cumberland.  And of course, the battery was part of the Tullahoma Campaign at the reporting date. Van Pelt killed in action at Chickamauga.
  • 2nd Battery (Battery B): Reporting from Corinth, Tennessee with two 12-pdr howitzers and three 3-inch rifles (under the “steel” column). The battery, under Lieutenant Albert F. R. Arndt, was posted to West Tennessee, under the District of Corinth, Sixteenth Corps.
  • 3rd Battery (Battery C): At Memphis, Mississippi.  One 12-pdr field howitzer and three 10-pdr Parrotts.  Under Captain George Robinson, this battery was also part of the District of Corinth, Sixteenth Corps.
  • 4th Battery (Battery D): Reporting Manchester, Tennessee with two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 10-pdr Parrotts, and two James 3.80-inch rifles.  Captain Josiah Church took this battery, assigned to the Third Division, Fourteenth Corps, into action at Hoover’s Gap in late June.
  • 5th Battery (Battery E): At Lavergne (?), Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain John J. Ely’s battery was part of the Artillery of the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and then serving under the garrison of Nashville.  The battery was assigned to a post named Fort Riley during this period.
  • 6th Battery (Battery F): Munfordsville, Kentucky with two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  By some reports, the battery had sections at Munfordsville, Bowling Green, and Louisville, through October 1863.  Captain Luther F. Hale commanded overall, and at Munfordsville.  That section had two 6-pdrs and two Parrotts, in a report to the Department of the Ohio on June 20.  Another section at Bowling Green under Lieutenant Byron Paddock also reported two 6-pdrs and two Parrotts.  As with the previous quarter, we have to ask if those were duplicate reports?  Or if only one section is represented for the summary? Or… one of those sections is carried in the other lines below.
  • 7th Battery (Battery G):  At Vicksburg, Mississippi with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  The battery was assigned to the Ninth Division, Thirteenth Corps and commanded by Captain Charles H. Lanphere.
  • 8th Battery (Battery H): Also reporting at Vicksburg, but with with two 12-pdr field howitzers, one 6-pdr (3.67-inch) rifles, and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  Captain Samuel De Golyer commanded this battery, assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, when the Vicksburg Campaign began.  On May 25, while directing one of his howitzers, De Golyer was mortally wounded (in the hip).   He died later in August.  Lieutenant Theodore W. Lockwood assumed command.
  • 9th Battery (Battery I): Reporting at Boonesboro, Maryland with six 3-inch rifles.  Captain Jabez J. Daniels commanded this battery.  When Stahel’s Cavalry Division transferred to the Army of the Potomac, Daniels’ battery became part of the 1st Brigade, Horse Artillery, Army of the Potomac.  However, the battery was detailed to support First Corps on July 3, and fired 322 rounds of Hotchkiss shot, shell, and canister in the fighting that day at Gettysburg.  Their monument is across from the Pennsylvania Memorial.
  • 10th Battery (Battery K): Reporting at Chattanooga, Tennessee, with four 3-inch rifles.  However, this reflects the September 1864 posting date.  In June 1863, the battery was at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C..  Captain John Schuetz commanded.  (The battery was sent west as part of the reinforcements sent to Chattanooga in November.)
  • 11th Battery (Battery L):  Not listed.  Under Captain Charles J. Thompson.  The battery reported to Cincinnati, Ohio in May.  First action on June 15, 1863, at Triplett’s Bridge, Kentucky.  And in July, the battery was active against Morgan’s Raid, with one section serving at Buffington’s Island.
  • 12th Battery (Battery M):  Not listed. Captain Edward G. Hillier commanded.  The battery did not leave the state until July 9, being dispatched to Indianapolis in reaction to Morgan’s Raid.

So with the two “fill ins” provided here at the end, we’ve reconstructed a complete list for the regiment.  The biggest remaining question is the sections of 6th Battery / Battery F.  It is my belief the battery had only four cannon, and the Department of the Ohio report duplicates the listings. And one of the “other” lines seems to reinforce that belief:

  • Finch’s (?) Section: In the previous quarter, we saw Lieutenant Amasa J. Finch, 18th Michigan Infantry, had two field howitzers at Hickman’s Bridge, Kentucky.  This was a temporary assignment, apparently disbanded before the end of the March.  Though the guns were turned over, the section still reported a handful of implements and tools on hand.
  • “Lieutenant, Stores in Charge”: Reporting from Bowling Green, Kentucky. This line included ammunition (which we will consider below), friction primers, and implements.  This line could account for Paddock’s section of 6th Battery / Battery F.  And if so, this indicates the section’s guns were accounted for with the main battery summary.
  • 12th Michigan Infantry: At Little Rock, Arkansas with one 12-pdr field howitzer.  At the end of June, 1863, the 12th Michigan was part of the reinforcements sent from the Sixteenth Corps to Vicksburg, and assigned as part of Kimball’s Provisional Division to the Thirteenth Corps.  Later in the summer and fall, the regiment moved with its parent brigade to the other side of the Mississippi, and was part of the force moving on Little Rock.  That city fell in November, which is also when the clerks received this return in Washington.  Thus explains the location.

So with those explanations, we seem to have the blanks covered and important questions answered.

Not so fast, as we move to the smoothbore ammunition:

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Like a canister pattern here, with numbers scattered all about:

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: 152 shell, 152 case, and 94 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: 80 shell, 80 case, and 35 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 4th Battery / Battery D: 98 shell, 108 case, and 40 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 206 shot, 133 case, and 137 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: 251 shot, 209 case, and 115 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 8th Battery / Battery H: 75 shot and 30 case for 6-pdr field guns; 128 shell, 95 case, and 27 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 9th Battery / Battery I: 12 shell for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • Bowling Green: 294 shot, 196 case, and 98 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 12th Infantry: 20 shell, 24 case, and 16 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

The first issue to consider is the 8th Battery / Battery H and the 6-pdr ammunition.  But that battery also had a rifled 6-pdr field gun, 3.67-inch caliber, which could use smoothbore ammunition in a pinch.

More concerning is the 9th Battery / Battery I with mountain howitzer ammunition on hand.  I can only speculate.

Finally, we see a substantial quantity of rounds at Bowling Green, which might support the idea this was a section from 6th Battery / Battery F.

Moving over to the rifled projectiles, we consider the Hotchkiss rounds first:

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Five batteries to consider:

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: 240 shot, 48 canister, 48 percussion shell, and 72 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery / Battery G: 202 canister, 399 fuse shell, and 1,487 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 8th Battery / Battery H: 117 shot, 62 percussion shell, and 12 fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles.
  • 9th Battery / Battery I:  96 canister, 120 percussion shell, 240 fuse shell, and 713 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery / Battery K: 96 canister, 165 percussion shell, 179 fuse shell, and 402 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

We have not seen much solid shot for 3-inch rifles reported.  So 2nd Battery / Battery B’s report is worthy of notice.

However, keep in mind the caliber of projectiles reported by 8th Battery / Battery H.  In this case, rifled 6-pdr caliber.

Moving to the next page, we’ll break this into segments for clarity:

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A leftover Hotchkiss column:

  • 8th Battery / Battery H: 27 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

So, both 3.67-inch and 3.80-inch in the same battery.  That 0.13-inch difference?

James Projectiles:

  • 4th Battery / Battery D: 413 shell, 150 case, and 12 canister for 3.80-inch rifls.
  • 8th Battery / Battery H: 1 shot and 272 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

And moving over to the Parrott and Schenkl columns:

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First the Parrott patent projectiles:

  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: 40 shell, 421 case, and 80 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 4th Battery / Battery D: 150 shell, 150 case, and 45 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 289 shell, 108 case, and 171 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: 412 shell, 381 case, and 92 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

Now the Schenkl patent:

  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 129 shot for 10-pdr Parrott.

Continuing with the Schenkl, we have one entry on the next page:

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  • 5th Battery / Battery E: 40 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.

Appears the 10-pdr ammunition chests were well stocked.

Lastly, we turn to the small arms.  Notice the hand-written column headers here.

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None of those come into play for the Michigan batteries.  But we’ll see those discussed in future installments.

For Michigan:

  • 2nd Battery / Battery B: Twenty Army revolvers and 31 cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery / Battery C: Seventeen cavalry sabers.
  • 4th Battery / Battery D: Twenty cavalry sabers.
  • 5th Battery / Battery E: Twenty-five cavalry sabers and ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 6th Battery / Battery F: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery / Battery G: Thirteen Army revolvers, forty-six cavalry sabers, and six horse artillery sabers.
  • 9th Battery / Battery I: 106 Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery / Battery H: Fifteen Army revolvers and sixty-nine horse artillery sabers.

Looking back to the previous quarter, there is some attrition and loss indicated with the small arms.  As one might expect with these batteries involved with hard campaigning.

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Summary Statement, 1st Quarter, 1863 – Michigan Artillery

The Wolverine State sent a full regiment of light artillery to war along with a couple of independent batteries.  But for the first quarter of 1863, only ten of those were on the rolls.  As mentioned in the review of the previous quarterly summary for Michigan, the Ordnance Department clerks used designations for independent batteries (i.e. 1st Battery, 2nd Battery), while other official records consider these as regimented batteries (i.e. Battery A, Battery B).  I’ll use regimental designations here, but call to reader’s attention the this should be a natural match – as 1st Battery appears to be Battery A; 2nd Battery as Battery B; and so on:

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In addition to the ten light batteries, there are two separate sections to consider (and hopefully identify):

  • Battery A (1st Battery): No return.  This should be Lieutenant George Van Pelt’s battery, assigned to First Division, Fourteenth Corps.  A February 1863 roll-up of all artillery in the Department of the Cumberland indicates the battery had five 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): Reporting from Bethel, Tennessee with two 12-pdr howitzers and three 3-inch rifles. Long story short on this battery’s history – having been overwhelmed at Shiloh the previous spring, it had just reconstituted and returned to duty.  The battery, under Lieutenant Albert F. R. Arndt, was posted to West Tennessee, under the District of Corinth, in the “catch all” Sixteenth Corps.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): At Corinth, Mississippi.  One 12-pdr field howitzer and three 10-pdr Parrotts.  Under Captain George Robinson, this battery was also part of the District of Corinth, Sixteenth Corps during the winter of 1863.
  • Battery D (4th Battery): Reporting somewhere in Tennessee, which I cannot make out. Two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 10-pdr Parrotts, and two James 3.80-inch rifles.  Assigned to the Third Division, Fourteenth Corps, under Captain Josiah Church, which was of course at Murfreesboro at the time in question.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): At Nashville, Tennessee with three 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain John J. Ely’s battery was part of the Artillery of the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and then serving in the garrison of Nashville.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): Munfordsville [sic], Kentucky. Two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  Records show that one section was at Munfordville under Lieutenant Luther F. Hale with two 6-pdrs and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  Another section was at Bowling Green under Lieutenant Byron Paddock also with two 6-pdrs and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  So did only one section report?  Or should we look to one of the separate sections entered separably?
  • Battery G (7th Battery):  At Vicksburg, Mississippi… which it indeed visited later in July!  But this battery spent the winter of 1863 between Young’s Point and Milliken’s Bend, Louisiana, as part of the Ninth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  The summary indicates six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles on hand.  Captain Charles H. Lanphere commanded (Lieutenant Robert M. Wilder held the command temporarily during the winter).
  • Battery H (8th Battery): At Milliken’s Bend, Louisiana with with two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 6-pdr (3.67-inch) rifles, and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  Captain Samuel De Golyer’s battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): Reporting at Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia with six 3-inch rifles.  Captain Jabez J. Daniels commanded this battery assigned to the Cavalry Division of the Department of Washington.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Arriving at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. at the end of the winter.  The battery reported two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch steel rifles. Captain John Schuetz commanded this battery through the war.

With the organized batteries out of the way, let us turn to the two section entries:

  • Finch’s Section: Hickman’s Bridge, Kentucky. Two 12-pdr field howitzers.  Lieutenant Amasa. J. Finch of the 18th Michigan Infantry had charge of a section in the District of Central Kentucky. This was a temporary assignment, apparently disbanded before the end of the March.
  • Section at Munfordville – Clearly indicated as at Munfordville and with three 10-pdr Parrotts.  The “name” column may be “Boyd’s” or other common name.  But without any other leads, all I will commit to is this line referenced a three-gun section at Munfordville.

With that, question tabled, we can turn to the smoothbore ammunition reported:

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With a lot of 6-pdr field guns and 12-pdr field howitzers to feed:

  • Battery B: 152 shell, 152 case, and 94 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery C: 30 shell, 80 case, and 35 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery D: 98 shell, 108 case, and 40 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery E: 206 shot, 133 case, and 137 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F: 258 shot, 209 case, and 115 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H: 240 shell and 63 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery K: 156 shell for 12-pdr mountain howitzers; 204 shell for 12-pdr field howitzers; and 48 shell for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Finch’s Section: 192 shell, 192 case, and 128 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

Battery K’s quantities raises eyebrows. Then again, the battery was in the “school house.”

Moving to the Hotchkiss rifled projectiles:

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Note the calibers and quantities cited here:

  • Battery B: 48 canister, 48 percussion shell, 72 fuse shell, 240 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 202 canister, 156 percussion shell, 252 fuse shell, 600 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H:  281 shot and 130 percussion shell for 12-pdr Wiard (3.67-inch) rifles.
  • Battery I: 96 canister, 200 percussion shell, 400 fuse shell, 720 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K:  96 canister, 165 percussion shell, and 165 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

First off, we see an abundance of case shot (bullet shell) for a couple of batteries. As for Battery H, those are not Wiard projectiles but rather Hotchkiss type that were made for a specific caliber.  That caliber happened to be associated closely to Wiard’s guns… at least by the clerks counting things. Clearly those were meant for use in the 3.67-inch rifled 6-pdrs.  This is also an indicator we’ll see Tatham’s columns used later.

On the next page, we can focus on just the James, Parrott, and Schenkl projectiles:

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The full page is posted, if you need reference.  But let us look specifically at the quantities reported.  First the James patent projectiles:

  • Battery D: 12 canister for James 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 97 shell for James 3.80-inch rifles.

Now the Parrott patent projectiles:

  • Battery C: 40 shell, 382 case, and 126 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery D: 150 shell, 150 case, and 45 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery E: 196 shell, 129 case, and 47 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery F: 422 shell, 381 case, and 92 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Munfordville Section:  417 shell and 150 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

Lastly, the first set of Schenkl projectile columns:

  • Battery C: 57 shot for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery E:  33 shot for 10-pdr Parrott.

And there is one more Schenkl projectile entry line listed on the next page:

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  • Battery D: 333 shell for 3.80-inch James.

And on the far right, the Tatham canister columns:

  • Battery H: 186 canister for 3.67-inch rifles; 41 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Yes, that 0.13-th of an inch mattered.

Finally, we can turn to the small arms on hand for the winter reporting period:

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By battery:

  • Battery B: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty-one cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: Eighteen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery D: Twenty cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: Ten horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery G: Fifteen Army revolvers, fifty-eight cavalry sabers, and six horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Fifty cavalry sabers.
  • Battery I: 141 Army revolvers and thirty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Fifteen Army revolvers and 128 horse artillery sabers.
  • Finch’s Section: One Army revolver and three cavalry sabers.
  • Munfordville Section: Two Army revolvers.

The biggest question mark for the Michigan summary in this quarter is that Munfordville section. Oh… bad penmanship of some clerk 153 years ago!

Summary Statement: December 31, 1862 – Michigan Batteries

During the Civil War, the state of Michigan mustered fourteen light artillery batteries. Of that set, only ten were organized at the time of the December 1862 report.   According to many official reports and returns, the first twelve were lettered batteries within the 1st Regiment Light Michigan Artillery (i.e. Battery A, 1st Michigan; Battery B, 1st Michigan, etc).  But other references cite these as numbered batteries (i.e. 1st Michigan Battery, 2nd Michigan Battery, etc).  As Dyer’s recognizes the first twelve as lettered batteries within a regiment of light artillery, I’m normally inclined to use such designations.  However, the summary statement for December 1862 lists these batteries by number.  So for this post I’ll translate from the listed designation to the other designation.

I said ten batteries, right?  Well we have ten and a detachment to discuss:

0051_Snip_Dec62_MI_1

We see all but the first two were diligent and filed their returns as required… all received by the fall of 1863.  Let me fill in the few blanks regarding battery assignments:

  • Battery A (1st Battery): No return.  Was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland’s Center Wing (1st Division) and at Stones River in December 1862. Lieutenant George Van Pelt’s battery rendered good service that day, firing 697 rounds.
  • Battery B (2nd Battery): No return. This battery was still smarting from losses sustained on April 6, 1862 … you know, first day at Shiloh.  A surviving section was attached to Battery C, 1st Missouri Light Artillery (Mann’s Battery).  And the reorganized, freshly recruited sections were in transit to west Tennessee that December.
  • Battery C (3rd Battery): Corinth, Mississippi.  One 12-pdr field howitzer and three 10-pdr Parrotts.  Assigned to the cumbersome 13th Corps at the time.
  • Battery D (4th Battery): Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 10-pdr Parrotts, and two James 3.80-inch rifles.  Assigned to the Third Division, Center Wing, Army of the Cumberland, Captain Josiah Church’s battery expended 170 rounds in the battle of Stones River.
  • Battery E (5th Battery): At Nashville, Tennessee with four 6-pdr field guns. This battery was on garrison duty.
  • Battery F (6th Battery): Munfordsville, Kentucky. Two 6-pdr field guns and two 10-pdr Parrotts.  Records show that one section (type of guns unknown) was at Munfordsville under Lieutenant L.F. Hale.  Another section was at Bowling Green under Lieutenant D.B. Paddock.
  • Battery G (7th Battery):  Carrollton, Louisiana.  Six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Carrollton was the battery’s location in September 1863, when the report was received in Washington.  In December 1862, this battery was with Sherman’s ill-fated Chickasaw Bayou expedition.
  • Battery H (8th Battery): No location indicated.  Two 12-pdr field howitzers, two 6-pdr (3.67-inch) rifles, and two James (3.80-inch) rifles.  This battery was in transit down the Mississippi River to Memphis, where it would join the 13th Corps.
  • Battery I (9th Battery): Washington, D.C.  Six 3-inch rifles.  This battery was assigned to the defenses of Washington. It would later become part of the Army of the Potomac’s Horse Artillery.
  • Battery K (10th Battery): Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch steel rifles. Was preparing for a posting to the defenses of Washington. Captain John Schuetz commanded this battery through the war.
  • Finch’s Section: Lexington, Kentucky. Two 12-pdr field howitzers.  Lieutenant A. J. Finch (18th Michigan Infantry, if my research is correct) commanded this section in the “Army of Kentucky” or District of Central Kentucky.

A fair allocation of the Michigan artillerists, weighted as one might expect to the Western Theater.

Turning to the ammunition, first the smoothbore reported:

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By battery from those reporting:

  • Battery C: 30 shell, 80 case, and 25 canister for 12-pdr field howitzer.
  • Battery D: 100 shell, 50 case, and 40 canister in 12-pdr field howitzer.
  • Battery E: 316 shot, 257 case, and 277 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery H: 240 shell and 63 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery K: 156 shell, 204 case, and 43 canister for 12-pdr field howitzer.
  • Finch’s Section: 96 shell, 96 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

Rifled projectile listings start with Hotchkiss:

0053_Snip_Dec62_MI_2

We see those for:

  • Battery G: 302 3-inch canister of the Hotchkiss type.
  • Battery H: 281 shot and 130 percussion shell of the Hotchkiss type for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • Battery I: 108 canister, 75 percussion shell, and 200 fuse shells of Hotchkiss type for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 96 canister, 165 percussion shell, 165 fuse shell, and 390 bolts of Hotickiss patent for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the James, Parrott, and Schenkle types:

0054_Snip_Dec62_MI_1

  • Battery C: 40 shell and 382 case Parrott-patent for 10-pdr Parrott.  And then 57 Schenkle shot for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery D: 30 case Parrott-type for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery H: 97 James-type for 3.80-inch rifles.

Continuing with Schenkle projectiles on the second page:

0054_Snip_Dec62_MI_2

  • Battery C: 126 Schenkle canister for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery D: 150 Schenkle shell for 10-pdr Parrott and 265 Schenkle shell for James 3.80-inch rifles.

Added to the end columns we see Battery H had 186 canister of 3.67-inch and 41 canister of 3.80-inch, both quantities of Tatham’s type.

And finally, the small arms reported by the Michigan batteries:

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  • Battery C:  Seven cavalry sabers.
  • Battery D: 20 cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: 10 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: 16 Army revolvers, 8 cavalry sabers, and 6 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: 50 cavalry sabers.
  • Battery I: 161 Army revolvers and 33 horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: 20 Army revolvers and 167 horse artillery sabers.
  • Finch’s section: Four cavalry sabers.

Clearly those Michigan troops in Washington, or destined to be posted to Washington, got the lion’s share of the pistols and edged weapons.