Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 2

Picking up where we left off with the last post, we proceed through Ohio’s independent batteries for the second quarter of 1863.  Looking at the “lower half” of those:

0209_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

As mentioned last week, there were twenty-six numbered independent batteries.  Only twenty-five appear on this list.  The last, the 26th Independent Battery, was Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry.  And we’ll see them tallied on a later page of the summaries.  For now, we have the 13th through the 25th:

 

  • 13th Battery: “Not in service.”  This battery ceased to exist, officially, in April 1862.
  • 14th Battery: Reporting, as of August, 1863, at Corinth, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. However, at the end of June, the battery part of the District of Jackson (though at Lynnville, Tennessee), Thirteenth Corps.   Lieutenant Homer H. Stull was the commander “in the field” with the battery.  But Stull died in May.  Captain Jerome B. Burrows returned later in the spring.
  • 15th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns.  Captain Edward Spear, Jr. remained in command.  The battery was in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps, and serving in the siege of the city.
  • 16th Battery: Reporting on September 25, 1863 as at Carrollton, Louisiana with one  6-pdr field gun, one 12-pdr Napoleon, and three 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain (promoted that spring) Russell P. Twist remained in command.  The battery was with Twelfth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  As such it was involved with the Vicksburg siege at the end of June 1863.
  • 17th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with six 10-pdr Parrotts. The battery was assigned to Tenth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  Captain Ambrose A. Blount remained in command through the much Vicksburg Campaign, but resigned on July 2.  Lieutenant Charles S. Rice was promoted to replace Blount.
  • 18th Battery: Reporting at Tullahoma, Tennessee with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Aleshire’s battery was in First Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • 19th Battery: As of January 1864, reporting at Knoxville, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery remained at Lexington, Kentucky through the first weeks of June.  After which, Captain Joseph C. Shields’ battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan.  The battery was officially in the District of Central Kentucky.   Later, in July, the battery was placed in First Division, Twenty-third Corps.
  • 20th Battery: Reporting, in June 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  The armament is fine.  But for June 1863 the battery was involved with the Tullahoma Campaign, and thus somewhere near Hoover Gap at the end of the quarter.  The battery remained under Captain [John T.] Edward Grosskopff  and assigned to assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps.
  • 21st Battery: No report.  The battery remained at Camp Dennison, Ohio, presumably still with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain James W. Patterson, commanding.  The battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan in July.
  • 22nd Battery: No report.  After organizing, the battery moved briefly to Wheeling, West Virginia (to counter resistance to the draft), with only two guns.  In mid-June the battery moved back to Camp Chase, Ohio, where two more guns were assigned.  Caliber not reported.  Commanded by Captain Henry M. Niel.
  • 23rd Battery: “Not in service.” This battery was formed from the 2nd Kentucky Infantry and later became the 1st Kentucky Independent Light Battery. Only mentioned here due to “placeholder” status.
  • 24th Battery:  No report. Not mustered until August 1863.  However, the battery does appear as assigned to the Department of Ohio with Lieutenant James W. Gamble assigned command of recruits gathered at Camp Dennison.
  • 25th Battery: Reporting from Little Rock, Arkansas, in May 1864, with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and four 3.67-inch rifles (replacing four 6-pdr smoothbores from the previous quarter).  In June 1863 the battery moved from Rolla to Pilot Knob, Missouri.  There the battery became part of the force that would advance on Little Rock in August.  Captain Julius L. Hadley was in command.

So of thirteen numbers, eight were posted to active departments.  Three were forming up.  And two were just administrative placeholders.

Turning to the smoothbore ammunition on hand:

 

0211_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five batteries reporting:

  • 14th Battery: 148 shot, 48 shell, 150 case, and 50 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 15th Battery: 233 shot, 123 case, and 220 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 16th Battery: 46 shot, 90 case, and 26 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 61 shot, 54 shell, 106 case, and 26 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 74 shot, 251 shell, 293 case, and 234 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: 62 shot, 41 shell, 34 case, and 34 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, first the Hotchkiss patents:

0211_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five lines:

  • 14th Battery: 147(?) canister, 385 percussion shell, and 276 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 190 shot and 120 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 246 canister, 115 percussion shell, 694 fuse shell, and 493 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 148(?) canister, 214 percussion shell, and 365 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 410 shot, 360 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles.

Notice the 25th Battery did not report Hotchkiss rounds for their 3-inch rifles.

Continuing to the next page, there are a couple of stray Hotchkiss columns and Dyer’s patent:

0212_1A_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Hotchkiss first:

  • 16th Battery: 104 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 160 Hotchkiss canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

Dyers:

  • 25th Battery: 172 Dyer’s shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the James columns:

0212_1B_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Just one:

  • 16th Battery: 50 shell and 450 case for 3.80-inch rifles.

Then on to the Parrott projectiles:

0212_1C_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

A lonely entry:

  • 17th Battery: 240 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

This begs the question as to what Blount’s battery was firing at Vicksburg.

One line from the Schenkl columns:

0212_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

  • 25th Battery: 159 shell and 80 canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

The 25th had a variety of projectiles for the rifled 6-pdrs, but apparently only shrapnel for the 3-inch rifles!

Lastly the small arms:

0212_3_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

By battery:

  • 14th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: Twenty-five Navy revolvers and twenty-two cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Nine Army revolvers.
  • 18th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers, three cavalry sabers, and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 20th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twenty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • 25th Battery: Six “Rifled muskets, foreign manufacture”, twenty-six Navy revolvers, and fourteen cavalry sabers.

From the previous quarter, the 25th Battery reported Belgian rifles.

Next we will look at the 1st Ohio Light Artillery’s batteries.

 

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Summary Statement, 1st Quarter, 1863 – Ohio’s Independent Batteries, Part 1

Ohio designated twenty-six batteries as “independent” numbered units during the Civil War.  As with our look at the previous quarter, we’ll split those into halves to facilitate detailed discussion (… and well.. also because the section is split across two pages in the summaries!).  So the first fourteen appear as such:

0132_1_Snip_OhioInd1

With ten of those reporting:

  • 1st Battery: No report. Captain James R. McMullin commanded this battery, supporting the Third Division, Eighth Corps, and posted to Kanawha Falls, West Virginia. The battery had 3-inch Ordnance Rifles at this time.
  • 2nd Battery: Reporting at Helena, Arkansas with  two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. At the start of the winter, Captain Newton J. Smith commanded this battery assigned to Twelfth Division (later Third Division), Thirteenth Corps.  Lieutenant Augustus Beach replaced Smith near the beginning of spring.
  • 3rd Battery: At Berry’s Landing, Louisiana with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   Berry’s Landing was a placename upstream of Helena, Arkansas, not in Louisiana!  In this case, the battery was around Lake Providence at the end of winter 1863.  So it is likely there were two such placenames in use.  Was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.  Captain William S. Williams commanding.
  • 4th Battery:  At Milliken’s Bend, Louisiana with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Captain Louis Hoffmann’s battery assigned to First Divsision, Fifteenth Corps.
  • 5th Battery:  At Memphis, Tennessee with two 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and two 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Commanded by Lieutenant Anthony B. Burton.  Briefly assigned to the Seventeenth Corps at the start of the winter months. Later, in January, moved with the rest of the division (Fourth) to Sixteenth Corps.
  • 6th  Battery:  Reporting from Murfreesboro, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons (replacing 6-pdrs) and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain Cullen Bradley remained in command of the battery, which was assigned to First Division, Twenty-First Corps with the reorganizations that winter.
  • 7th Battery: Memphis, Tennessee with four 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Like the 5th Battery, the 7th was briefly listed in the Seventeenth Corps until the Forth Division transferred to the Sixteenth Corps.   Captain Silas A. Burnap remained commander.
  • 8th Battery: No report.  Commanded by Captain (promoted)  James F. Putnam, this battery was assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps.
  • 9th Battery: Brentwood, Tennessee (between Franklin and Nashville) with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Commanded by Captain Harrison B. York and assigned to the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • 10th Battery: Lake Providence, Louisiana with four 3.80-inch James Rifles. At the start of January 1863, this battery,  under Captain Hamilton B. White, was in Sixth Division, Sixteenth Corps.  But that division moved to the Seventeenth Corps later in the month.  You need a cheat sheet to follow Grant’s old Thirteenth Corps reorganizations!
  • 11th Battery: No report. Was part of the Seventh Division, Sixteenth Corps at the start of January.  When the division transferred to the Seventeenth Corps, the battery went along. By the end of spring, Lieutenant Fletcher E. Armstrong was in command.
  • 12th Battery: At Aquia Creek, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Aaron C. Johnson commanded this battery assigned to the Eleventh corps.
  • 13th Battery: No report. Losing all its guns at Shiloh, this battery ceased to exist after April 1862.
  • 14th Battery: Jackson, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. The battery part of the District of Jackson (though at Lynnville, Tennessee), Thirteenth Corps at this time, under Lieutenant Homer H. Stull.

What I like about this set of batteries is the variation among gun tubes assigned.  We see some 6-pdrs and field howitzers still on hand.  A lot of James Rifles.  But the Napoleons, Parrotts, and Ordnance Rifles beginning to replace the older weapons. An interesting mix for the middle of the war.

Turning to smoothbore projectiles:

0134_1_Snip_OhioInd1

Like a canister blast pattern!

  • 2nd Battery: 41 shell, 113 case, and 77 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 3rd Battery: 120 shot, 143 case, and 59 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 4th Battery: 110 shell, 105 case, and 92 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 5th Battery: 40 shot, 267 case, and 93 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 57 shell, 147 case, and 82 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 6th Battery: 118 shot, 52 shell, 76 case, and 80 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 9th Battery: 180 shot, 243 shell, 446 case, and 310 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 14th Battery: 148 shot, 48 shell, 150 case, and 58 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to rifled projectiles, we start with the Hotchkiss types:

0134_2_Snip_OhioInd1

We can split this page between the James Rifles (majority) and the Ordnance Rifles (two battery).  Starting with Hotchkiss projectiles for James rifles:

  • 2nd Battery: 60 shot, 127 percussion shell, and 310 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: 58 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 4th Battery: 55 shot and 240 percussion shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 7th Battery: 66 shot for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 39 shot and 71 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Now the two batteries with Hotchkiss for 3-inch Ordnance Rifles:

  • 12th Battery: 171 percussion shell, 497 fuse shell, and 407 bullet shell in 3-inch.
  • 14th Battery: 148 canister, 160 percussion shell, 160 fuse shell, and 340 bullet shell in 3-inch.

For simplicity, let’s break the next page into batches.  Starting with some “trailing columns” of Hotchkiss and those of Dyer’s Patent:

0135_1A_Snip_OhioInd1

One line for Hotckiss left:

  • 10th Battery: 389 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

And likewise for Dyer’s:

  • 12th Battery: 120 canister for 3-inch.

Moving to the James-patent projectiles, as we would expect there are many entries:

0135_1B_Snip_OhioInd1

  • 2nd Battery: 51 shot in 3.80-inch.
  • 3rd Battery: 63 shot and 210 shell in 3.80-inch.
  • 4th Battery: 170 shell in 3.80-inch.
  • 5th Battery: 55 shot, 151 shell, and 95 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 7th Battery: 60 shell and 100 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 10th Battery:  203 shell in 3.80-inch.

Moving to the right, one battery with Parrotts, so….

0135_1C_Snip_OhioInd1

  • 6th Battery:  440 shell, 347 case, and 60 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

Turning to the next page…

0135_2_Snip_OhioInd1

Just a few entries for Schenkl shells:

  • 3rd Battery: 122 shells for 3.80-inch.
  • 7th Battery: 320 shells for 3.80-inch.
  • 10th Battery: 176 shells for 3.80-inch.

Where we see James rifles in use, we often see Tatham’s Canister:

  • 2nd Battery: 144 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 3rd Battery: 78 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 4th Battery: 90 canister in 3.80-inch.
  • 7th Battery: 80 canister in 3.80-inch.

I find interesting that among these batteries with James rifles, there is a mix of shells from different patent types.  And with the canister, we see the 7th Battery reported both James’ and Tatham’s on hand – thus alluding to differences with the two types.

We close with the small arms:

0135_3_Snip_OhioInd1

By battery reporting:

  • 2nd Battery: Three Army revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery: Twenty-three Army revolvers, eight cavalry sabers, and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • 4th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers, fifty-five cavalry sabers, six horse artillery sabers, and eighteen foot artillery sabers.
  • 5th Battery: Seven Navy revolvers and sixteen cavalry sabers.
  • 7th Battery: Ten Army revolvers and seven horse artillery sabers.
  • 9th Battery: Thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Five Army revolvers and thirteen cavalry sabers.
  • 14th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.

Notice the 12th Battery, posted in Virginia, reported no small arms on hand. I would expect the battery to have some arms on hand, but not many.

Summary Statement: December 31, 1862 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 2

Let us continue with the Ohio independent batteries and review the second half of their fourth quarter, 1862 summaries:

0067_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_1

Again, we see some batteries skipped in the order.  In this case the 13th and 14th. Of the   six reporting, two have returns not posted until 1864.   In addition, just to say we’ve had a complete look, there were some batteries, beyond the 20th, which deserve mention.

  • 11th Battery: No report.  Was part of the Seventh Division, Left Wing, Thirteenth Corps and camped around Germantown, Tennessee, outside Memphis.  Captain Frank C. Sands commanding.  UPDATE:  Phil Spaugy has a great post up about the 11th Battery in action at Iuka.  He passed along a source indicating the battery had two 3.67-inch rifles, two 6-pdr field guns, and two 12-pdr field howitzers at Iuka in September 1862.
  • 12th Battery: At Falmouth, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Aaron C. Johnson commanded this battery assigned to the Eleventh corps.
  • 13th Battery: Not listed.  Losing all its guns at Shiloh, this battery ceased to exist after April 1862.
  • 14th Battery: Not listed.  The battery part of the District of Jackson (though at Lynnville, Tennessee), Thirteenth Corps at this time, under Lieutenant Homer H. Stull.
  • 15th Battery: Tallahachie, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns.  The 15th was involved with Grant’s Northern Mississippi , as part of the Fourth Division, Right Wing, Thirteenth Corps.  Captain Edward Spear, Jr. commanded.
  • 16th Battery: No location given, but with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Lieutenant Russell Twist commanded this battery at Helena, assigned to District of Eastern Arkansas, in the Department of Missouri.  But the battery was soon to be pulled into the Vicksburg Campaign.
  • 17th Battery: No report.  Captain Ambrose A. Blount commanded this battery.  Blount’s battery was among the unattached artillery supporting Sherman’s failed attempt at Chickasaw Bayou that December.
  • 18th Battery: Nashville, Tennessee with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. The location may be valid for March 1863, as received in Washington.  However, at the close of 1862, Captain Charles Aleshire’s battery had just arrived in Lousiville, Kentucky, as part of Second Division, Army of Kentucky.
  • 19th Battery: Knoxville, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons. The 19th, under Captain Joseph C. Shield, was also in Second Division, Army of Kentucky, but moving towards Frankfort at the close of 1862.  The Knoxville location was valid for February 1864, when the return was posted to Washington.
  • 20th Battery: Nashville, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  The 20th, under Captain Edward Grosskopff (formerly of the 10th Ohio Independent Battery), arrived a few days late to participate in the Battle of Stones River.  They were, at that time, not assigned to a field formation.
  • 21st Battery, 22nd Battery, and 24th Battery:  Not organized until later in 1863.
  • 23rd Battery: Not listed. Mustered in 1861, this battery was attached to 2nd Kentucky Infantry.  It became the 1st Kentucky Independent Light Battery.
  • 25th Battery: Not listed.  Formed as the 3rd Battery Kansas Artillery, this battery was re-designated as the 25th Ohio Independent Light Battery in February 1863.
  • 26th Battery: Not listed.  This battery was actually Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry, detached for artillery service.  It was among those units surrendered at Harpers Ferry on September 15, 1862 (thus no report).  Upon receiving their exchange, the battery resumed duty as infantry in Company F.  This began a curious story where by Captain Theobold D. Yost’s men were sometimes a battery and other times infantry.  Only in December 1863 was the 26th permanently established.

So I figure we should have entries for nine batteries, but only six have reports tallied.  We work with what is there.

And we will work first wit the smoothbore ammunition:

0069_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_1

Four batteries reporting quantities:

  • 15th Battery: For 6-pdr field guns – 412 shot, 256 case, and 164 canister.
  • 16th Battery: For 6-pdr field guns – 210 shot, 167 case, and 98 canister.
  • 19th Battery: For 12-pdr Napoleons – 96 shot, 358 shell, 306 case, and 222 canister.
  • 20th Battery: For 12-pdr Napoleons – 150 shot, 50 shell, 150 case, and 50 canister.

For rifled ammunition, starting with Hotchkiss-type:

0069_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_2

Again, four batteries to consider:

  • 12th Battery:  350(or 250?) fuse shell and 730 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery:  340 shot and 340 fuse shell for 3.80-inch James Rifles.
  • 18th Battery:  144 canister, 225 percussion shell, 530 fuse shell, and 480 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 100 canister, 160 percussion shell, 160 fuse shell, and 375 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

Just one entry to consider for the next page:

0070_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_1

12th Battery reported 125 3-inch Dyer’s canister.

Then a couple of entries on the next page:

0070_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_2

12th Battery also had 125 3-inch Schenkl shells.  16th Battery had 136(?) of Tatham’s canister for their 3.80-inch rifles.

Lastly, the small arms reported:

0070_Snip_Dec62_2_Ohio_3

By battery:

  • 15th Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and eighty-eight cavalry sabers.
  • 18th Battery:  Thirty Army revolvers, twelve cavalry sabers, and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 20th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.

So of those reporting, only the 12th Battery indicated no small arms on hand. Somehow I think that an omission of some sort.