“The weakest feature in this line of works… is their liability to be surprised.”: Washington Defenses May 1864

On this day (May 17) in 1864, Brigadier-General Albion P. Howe, inspector of artillery (and former division commander in the Army of the Potomac’s Sixth Corps), submitted a lengthy report examining the defenses of Washington, D.C.  The Secretary of War assigned this task to Howe in late April.  No doubt the justification for this inspectionContinue reading ““The weakest feature in this line of works… is their liability to be surprised.”: Washington Defenses May 1864″

Need heavy guns on the Potomac: Seacoast defenses for Washington

Even after all direct threats to Washington, D.C. abated with the end of the Gettysburg Campaign, at least one man in the capital city saw the need to improve defenses. On September 1, 1863, Brigadier-General John G. Barnard wrote to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton: The works of Rozier’s Bluff, and near Jones’ PointContinue reading “Need heavy guns on the Potomac: Seacoast defenses for Washington”

Elevating Gear for your 30-pdr Parrott

I’ve used this photo a few times now. It is a 30-pdr Parrott rifle at Lee’s Hill at Fredericksburg. The carriage is a metal reproduction, replacing a wooden carriage which had badly deteriorated (and left the 4200 pound gun in an unsafe condition). The carriage is a close copy of a siege carriage. You seeContinue reading “Elevating Gear for your 30-pdr Parrott”