“Developed his position, strength, and movements”: Blunt’s day at Lexington, Missouri

September 19, 1864 was a busy day in the Civil War.  Actions in several theaters, not the least of which occurred outside Middletown, Virginia (150th anniversary events I hope to attend today). As I’ve been following Major-General Sterling Price’s campaign in Missouri, let me turn to activity at Lexington, Missouri, 150 years ago today.  AsContinue reading ““Developed his position, strength, and movements”: Blunt’s day at Lexington, Missouri”

“They deem it strange that in such a plentiful country… breadstuffs cannot be supplied”: Price’s logistics strained

For October 18, 1864, Major-General Sterling Price’s itinerary for the Army of Missouri simply said “At Waverly; twenty-two miles.”  Price’s columns had covered a great deal of ground since entering Missouri (and add to that the march across Arkansas prior to that).  Although since threatening St. Louis and Jefferson City, Price’s army had not setContinue reading ““They deem it strange that in such a plentiful country… breadstuffs cannot be supplied”: Price’s logistics strained”

“When he left us a star went out”: Shelby’s lament at the loss of Colonel Shanks

I mentioned Brigadier-General Joseph Shelby’s writing style.  His report of the second half of Major-General Sterling Price’s 1864 Campaign, written in December of that year, is a shade or two more literature than official correspondence.  Relating the details of his division’s advance to the Osage River, earlier in October: I reconnoitered the ford warily, showingContinue reading ““When he left us a star went out”: Shelby’s lament at the loss of Colonel Shanks”