“The troops in Virginia and Tennessee have generally built [forts]…”: Slave labor for seacoast forts

Last month, while discussing the issues facing the Charleston defenders, I mentioned the shortage of labor needed to build the defenses. General P.G.T. Beauregard and other military officials complained the planters failed to supply the numbers required to complete the works. Often when interpreting this particular issue, we bring up the irony that in orderContinue reading ““The troops in Virginia and Tennessee have generally built [forts]…”: Slave labor for seacoast forts”

150 Years Ago: Beauregard prepares for a coming storm

On February 17, 1863, General P.G.T. Beauregard felt it was time to ready his command and send the alarm to the cities of Charleston and Savannah.  His headquarters monitored Federal activity on ashore and afloat, indicating something was due to happen soon.  At least that’s the way Beauregard figured it. In preparation, he ordered theContinue reading “150 Years Ago: Beauregard prepares for a coming storm”

A “favorable military position” on the Altamaha: Lake Bluff Battery

As with any railroad in the Confederacy, the Savannah, Albany & Gulf Railroad (SA&G RR) was a valuable asset.  The line ran south from Savannah then made a wide arch to the west.  When first chartered in 1847, the company intended to connect with Albany, Georgia.  Spur lines could bring in commerce from across southernContinue reading “A “favorable military position” on the Altamaha: Lake Bluff Battery”