“It was the time of the burning”: A story from Loudoun County’s Burning Raid

On December 2, 1864, Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt led his 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Shenandoah westward through Snicker’s Gap.  With that passage, the cavalry concluded a raid, started on November 27, through Loudoun Valley and western parts of Loudoun County.  This was, in a smaller for, the same treatment given portions of the ShenandoahContinue reading ““It was the time of the burning”: A story from Loudoun County’s Burning Raid”

150 Years Ago: Skirmishing with Mosby at Rector’s Cross Roads

Studying the Civil War in Northern Virginia, a theme emerges shortly after the Gettysburg campaign.  Hardly a week would pass without some action involving Lieutenant-Colonel John S. Mosby.  The activities of that partisan ranger only slackened in the last few months of the war.  But even then, as the oft spoken quip alludes to, MosbyContinue reading “150 Years Ago: Skirmishing with Mosby at Rector’s Cross Roads”

Marching BACK through Loudoun: Return of the Army of the Potomac

Careful you don’t get whiplash as I shift between theaters. Last month I offered a series of posts detailing the movement of the Army of the Potomac through Loudoun. But let’s not forget the Army of the Potomac came back through Loudoun during the later half of July 1863. My research into that movement isContinue reading “Marching BACK through Loudoun: Return of the Army of the Potomac”