“The small number of artillerists now in the department”: The artillery of the Department of the South, Spring 1864

Major-General John G. Foster assumed command of the Department of the South on May 26, 1864.  Foster served at Charleston (specifically Fort Moultrie) before the war, had been second in command at Fort Sumter when the war started, but spent much of the next two years in North Carolina.  Foster was familiar with Charleston… andContinue reading ““The small number of artillerists now in the department”: The artillery of the Department of the South, Spring 1864″

“Ninety-five tons of loyal complements”: Bombardment of Charleston continues

The last I detailed the Federal bombardment of Charleston was in relation to increased bombardments in the middle of January 1864. Through the end of January, Confederate observers recorded 990 projectiles reached the city, with an additional 533 falling short. The average, considering days on which no shots were fired at the city, was 49Continue reading ““Ninety-five tons of loyal complements”: Bombardment of Charleston continues”

The Wiard Guns on Morris Island: More field guns on the second parallel

In the earlier post, I pointed out that looking at the details in this photo showing Napoleon guns on the second parallel on Morris Island: We see this: And this (full size so you can pick out the details): Notice the maneuvering handspike on the lower left. Those details show up on the right handContinue reading “The Wiard Guns on Morris Island: More field guns on the second parallel”